Job Searching with Social Media For Dummies book cover

Job Searching with Social Media For Dummies

By: Joshua Waldman Published: 10-07-2013

Harness social media to land your dream job

For anyone looking for a first job, exploring a career change, or just setting up for future success, social media sites are proven platforms for facilitating connections, demonstrating passions and interests, and ultimately landing the job. Job Searching with Social Media For Dummies enables you to harness the power of the Internet to research and identify job opportunities, and then create a strategy for securing a position.

Job Searching with Social Media For Dummies features in-depth coverage of topics such as: creating effective online profiles and resumes to sell your strengths; maintaining your online reputation and understanding electronic etiquette; using the power of personal branding and building your brand online; avoiding common pitfalls, such as jumping into filling out a social media profile without a strategy; getting to know Twitter, the only real-time job board with literally thousands of jobs posted daily; using social media sites to uncover opportunities in the "hidden job market" ahead of the competition; and much more.

  • Takes the mystery out of Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn
  • Offers advice on how to brand yourself online
  • Includes coverage of the latest changes to social platforms and websites

If you're a recent graduate, changing careers, or have been away from the job-search scene for a while, turn to the trusted guidance and expert insight of Job Searching with Social Media For Dummies.

Articles From Job Searching with Social Media For Dummies

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183 results
183 results
Automate Craigslist for Fast Job-Posting Alerts

Article / Updated 01-15-2020

Despite the craziness of Craigslist, it’s still a marvelous place to find up-to-the-minute job postings. In fact, if you were to walk into a business and ask the hiring manager about the first place he would post an ad for a new job, without much thought he’d likely say, “Oh, I’ll just drop it on Craigslist to get some résumés in the door.” Craigslist is a great resource for part-time jobs, temp jobs, and entry-level jobs. Typically, jobs posted on Craigslist are filled at a fast pace and can be a real solution for someone not interested in spending (or not in a position to spend) a lot of time on strategy or networking. Although you should spend time researching a company before applying for a job, listings on Craigslist don’t always allow for that. You want to apply when you can and as soon as you can, before someone else snatches the job right from under you. Follow these steps to guarantee you’re the first person to know about any new job postings in your area of interest without camping out on Craigslist all day: Visit Craigslist and go to the Jobs section you’re interested in. Type in all the necessary filters in the search field so you see specific jobs that interest you. For example, if you’re an educator, click on the Education link in the Jobs section and filter with the keyword “ESL.” The results should be a list of jobs you could do pretty well at. Copy the URL from the search result that you want instant updates from. Find the URL in the address bar of your browser. It will look something like this: http://nh.Craigslist.org/search/sss?query=training+wheels+%28newfields|newmarket|Epping|stratham|greenland|hampton|seacoast|exeter%29&srchType=A&minAsk=&maxAsk=> Open a new browser tab or window, head to the IFTTT website, and set up a free account. IFTTT is a free website that lets you build logical statements that connect several different actions online. For instance, you can build a recipe that sends you an e-mail every time you are tagged in a Facebook photo. You’ll soon receive an e-mail asking you to confirm your e-mail address. Find the recipe called Craigslist Search and paste in the URL you copied from Craigslist. The faster you respond to a Craigslist posting, the more likely it is that someone will read your résumé. So if you think you’ll respond better by getting an alert via text message, Gmail, or chat, feel free to use any of the 900+ recipes for Craigslist on IFTTT. As you find job opportunities on Craigslist, remember to jot down the names of the companies. You need these names later when you search out people on LinkedIn to talk to.

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10 Job Boards That Are Social Media Enabled

Step by Step / Updated 02-22-2017

A new breed of job board has emerged. The Internet has evolved beyond bulletin boards, and no one reads newspaper classifieds anymore. Social-media networks provide much more value and personalization than just reading information on forums. The new online job boards, including the ten listed here, take advantage of today’s technologies, social networks, personalization, and gamification.

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Job Searching with Social Media For Dummies Cheat Sheet

Cheat Sheet / Updated 03-27-2016

Social media is a crucial component of the modern job search. To perform a successful job search using social-media tools, however, you need to know more than how to accept a friend or connection request or post a status update. You also need to know how to get your online profiles noticed by hiring managers, build a job-attracting LinkedIn profile, maintain your online reputation, and much more.

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How to Find Local Job Recruiters on Twitter

Article / Updated 03-26-2016

Twitter is a great tool for finding job openings in your local area. You'll find job recruiters and hiring managers tweeting about jobs they're trying to fill. Here's how you can find them on Twitter: Head to Twitter Advanced Search. In the field named This exact phrase, enter the name of your town or city. In Hashtags, enter Jobs. Press Search. Scroll through the list of recent tweets and click the pictures. Doing so reveals if they're local businesses recruiting for a job or independent recruiters filling a contract. Follow the recruiters you like and send them a tweet saying Hi!

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3 Ways to Use LinkedIn to Advance Your Career Change

Article / Updated 03-26-2016

LinkedIn is one of the most powerful tools to help you redefine yourself and move your career in a new direction. Taking your career in a new direction is a bold move that requires framing your proven skills for a whole new purpose. Identify your transferable skills, and then consider the following three ideas for using LinkedIn to advance your career change. Use the profile headline to reveal what you do When setting up a LinkedIn profile, many people wonder what to put in their headline and job title if they're looking to make a career change. The good news is that you are who you say you are online. You don't need a company to tell you that you are now an accountant and no longer a program manager. If you say it, it's true. Use your LinkedIn Headline to tell the world, in present tense, what you would like to do. So if you want to be an accountant, say "I'm an accountant." Sure, it may feel incongruent at first. But if you indeed have the appropriate skills and you love the work, then you, and no one else, can define who you are. Use the location where you want to work If you're willing to move to where the jobs are, then update your LinkedIn profile to the address or zip code of the place you want to be. Economists say that most of today's unemployment would go away if people weren't tied down to where they live. Sure, it's underwater mortgages, but it's also an unwillingness to go where the jobs are. If you can cut the rope, your chances of getting hired to do what you love increase quite a bit. Think about how you use a job board. You enter two pieces of data: job title and location. Recruiters do the same thing. So if you want an accounting job in San Francisco, your profile is more likely to show up on a search-results page if your location matches that of the recruiter. Add recruiters to your network Recruiters want you in their network because they may want to pitch you for a position. So when you add recruiters whom you've never even met before, they're very likely to accept your connection invite. Furthermore, external recruiters work with companies in contracts. So when you add a recruiter as a primary contact, you're very likely going to pick up a collection of people working at the companies you are targeting in your second degree network. Therefore, the more recruiters you have in your network, the greater your chance of 1) showing up in targeted search results and 2) having an effective second-degree network

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How to Use Google AdWords to Target Specific Hiring Managers

Article / Updated 03-26-2016

Use Google AdWords, the search engine's pay-per-click advertising tool, to attract the attention of specific hiring managers and decision makers. Adwords enables you to take up an ad on the search results page of any keywords you choose. You can use a similar technique on the ad networks of Bing, Yahoo!, Facebook, and even Twitter. Go to Google Adwords and sign in with your Google ID. If you don't already have a Google ID, create a new one. Click Create a New Campaign for the Search Only Network. This tells Google to only display your ad on Google search results. Follow Google's wizard on picking a keyword and writing an ad. For keywords, choose the name of the person you are trying to attract. Because people's names aren't very popular advertising terms, try bidding just 10 to 20 cents per click. When you're done with the wizard, pay Google so that your ad gets displayed. Click on Billing and drop $50 into your campaign, sit back, relax, and wait for your phone to ring! In your ad, include a link to a landing page just for the person you're targeting. If they just go to your LinkedIn profile, they won't know what you want.

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Have a Strategy to Make Social Media Job Search for You

Article / Updated 03-26-2016

Don’t get bogged down in keeping up with the seeming constant changes of social media, just keep focused on your goals and how these tools can help you achieve them. For people just beginning to use social media to advance their careers, a common complaint is that it changes so much. For example, they often cite the most recent Facebook privacy change or LinkedIn’s new user interface. A good army general doesn’t get caught up in the trees; he sees the forest. Likewise, as commander of your own career, seeing the whole picture can free you from the irrelevant minutia that can so often distract your competition. It’s not which tools you use, but what you use the available tools to accomplish. By using the four-part strategy summarized here, you will: Avoid feeling overwhelmed by the technology. Always have the tools you need to get a job. Never feel like you are wasting your time online. Be confident that you are proactively advancing your career. This four-part strategy was adapted from many years of working with job seekers and interviewing coaches. Social-media tools will help you accomplish any of these four steps. Therefore, it hardly matters whether or not you’ve used Twitter to research people, LinkedIn to research issues, and Zoominfo to e-mail decision makers . . . or any combination. Research people: Start by knowing what kinds of people you want to find, such as info-interview sources and hiring managers. Research issues: From online sources, find out what these people care about, what issues concern them, what goals drive them, and what problem plague them. Interview for information: Guessing from online sources can only take you so far. Reach out to low-stakes contacts to ask one-on-one questions and build new and targeted relationships. Engage the decision maker: By now, you have enough information to know what a decision maker cares about. Let her know you exist by reaching out in a professionally assertive way, not assuming you’re the bread to her butter but still with the confidence of your research to back you up.

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Breaking the Illusion of a Professional and Personal Divide

Article / Updated 03-26-2016

Since the beginning of work, people have gotten jobs from their friends and family. Networking has always been the best way to get “in” with an opportunity. Do you remember the movie The Graduate? In a scene during a dinner party, the main character is accosted by his father’s business friend. This gregarious older gentleman puts his arm around the younger main character and says, “Plastics, my boy!” In the movie, the main character was offered a job from his father’s best friend. Yet people have so much anxiety about mixing their so-called professional network with their personal network. But if you think about it, not only will friends be more likely to refer you into jobs, but you’ve probably also made some of your best friends at jobs! How can you possibly draw this line? Don’t be afraid to bring your Facebook and LinkedIn networks closer together. Bringing friends to LinkedIn can help you consider each other in a professional light and benefit from each other’s connections. Follow these steps to invite your Facebook friends to LinkedIn: Log on to Facebook and click the gear icon on the top-right of the page. Click Account Settings. Click Download a copy of your Facebook Data. Upload the contact record’s e-mail addresses to LinkedIn.

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Should You Have a LinkedIn Profile?

Article / Updated 03-26-2016

Certainly LinkedIn is a great tool to have at your job-search disposal. But not all industries are evenly represented there, and so it may not be for you. In some cases, using LinkedIn for some jobs can be a waste of time. In other cases, having a profile is essential. It’s up to you to decide. According to research done by Dan Zarrella, the most connected profession on LinkedIn is recruiters. Therefore, if you work (or want to work) in an industry that doesn’t rely on recruiters, you may not have strong results. However, if you know recruiters often specialize in your field, your chances of getting that unexpected phone call about an opportunity are higher. Other research by Zoomsphere.com indicates that information technology, financial services, and retail are the top industries represented by users (apart from college students). LinkedIn’s own research puts manufacturing at No. 3 and medical (not the same as healthcare) as No. 4. If you work in one of these well-represented fields, you may have a good chance of making valuable connections. Conduct your own research and determine if all the hype about LinkedIn applies to you.

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How to Turn Twitter into a Real-Time, Location-Specific Job Board

Article / Updated 03-26-2016

Twitter is considered the most popular real-time open network. This means that as items are published, they are immediately available for viewing. And you don’t need to “follow,” “connect,” or “request” to see them, making everything posted on Twitter open for you to read. For job seekers, this is great news because it allows you nonhierarchical access to huge amounts of job information, including postings directly from employers and recruiters. In order to cut through the fire hose of information and find relevant jobs in your area, use this technique: Log in to Twitter. Click on Advanced Search to access the hidden search parameters. Use one of these words in the field All of these words: Hiring Jobs Jobsearch Enter your city and state abbreviation in the field Near this place. Search for jobs. Experiment with different keywords until you get search results you like best. Click on the gear icon and save your search. You can access this search again by clicking the search box on any Twitter page.

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