Canon EOS Rebel T7i/800D For Dummies book cover

Canon EOS Rebel T7i/800D For Dummies

By: Julie Adair King Published: 08-07-2017

Action, beauty, adventure, and art—start capturing memories today!

Canon EOS Rebel T7i/800D For Dummies is your ultimate guide to taking spectacular photos—no photography experience required! The EOS Rebel offers professional features that camera phones just cannot match, and this book shows you how to take advantage of these features to take stunning photos in any situation. First, you'll take a tour of the controls to learn what everything does, where to find it, and how to use it. Next, you'll walk through the automatic, scene, and manual modes to learn the strengths and weaknesses of each, and how to choose a mode based on your goals for that particular photo. You'll learn how to capture action shots, take beautiful portraits, and get as artsy as you want to get as you adjust for color, lighting, and focus, and control exposure for different effects.

Taking great photos doesn't have to be difficult! Your camera offers everything you need to perfectly capture any scene, and this book provides clear, easy-to-follow instruction to help you take full advantage of these professional tools.

  • Get acquainted with your camera's controls
  • Shoot in automatic, scene, or manual mode
  • Compose shots and work with lighting like a pro
  • Adjust for focus, color, depth of field, and more

Whether you're taking pictures at a party, shooting scenery on vacation, catching action at a ball game, or just wandering around capturing spontaneous moments of beauty, awesome photos are just a few simple steps away. Your Canon EOS Rebel T7i/800D is equipped with the tools to make any scene share-worthy, and Canon EOS Rebel T7i/800D For Dummies equips you to start snapping professional-quality photos today!

Articles From Canon EOS Rebel T7i/800D For Dummies

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35 results
35 results
Canon EOS Rebel T7i/800D For Dummies Cheat Sheet

Cheat Sheet / Updated 02-01-2022

Your Canon T7i/800D has so many features that it can be difficult to remember what each control does. To help you sort things out, this Cheat Sheet offers a handy reference to your camera's external controls and exposure modes. Print out this guide, tuck it in your camera bag, and get a head start on taking great photographs!

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Exposure Modes on the Canon EOS Rebel T7i/800D Camera

Article / Updated 01-24-2018

Your choice of exposure mode determines how much control you have over picture settings, including options that affect exposure, color, and autofocusing features. Set the exposure mode via the Mode dial shown here. For the most control, switch to P, Tv, Av, or M mode. Canon refers to those modes as Creative Zone modes; the others are Basic Zone modes. Exposure Mode Description Scene Intelligent Auto Completely automatic photography; the camera analyzes the scene and tries to choose settings that produce the best results. Auto Flash Off Same as Auto, but with flash disabled. Scene Automatic modes for capturing specific types of scenes. Four scenes (Portrait, Landscape, Close-up, and Sports) have their own setting on the Mode dial. Set the dial to the SCN position to access additional scene types. Creative Auto Provides a bit more control than Scene Intelligent Auto, enabling you to adjust the amount of background blurring and a few other picture characteristics. Creative Filter Enables you to add special effects to pictures and movies as you shoot them. P (Programmed Autoexposure) Camera selects both the f-stop and shutter speed to ensure proper exposure, but you can choose from multiple combinations of the two settings. Tv (Shutter-priority Autoexposure) You set the shutter speed, and the camera selects the f-stop that will produce a good exposure. Av (Aperture-priority Autoexposure) You select the f-stop, and the camera selects the shutter speed that will produce a good exposure. M (Manual Exposure) You control both the shutter speed and f-stop.

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Functions of Buttons and Other Controls on the Canon EOS Rebel T7i/800 Camera

Article / Updated 01-24-2018

It's great to have a map to the buttons and controls on your camera, but it's not a lot of help if you can't remember which button to press when (and why). So here's a quick recap of what you can do with each button. Note: This information concentrates on features available when you shoot in the P, Tv, Av, and M exposure modes. A few features also work in other modes. This Control . . . Performs These Functions Mode dial Sets the exposure mode, which determines how much control you have over picture settings. For the most control, choose P, Tv, Av, or M. Menu button Press to display and hide camera menus; rotate Main dial to cycle through menu pages. Info button During playback, Live View photography, and Movie shooting, changes the data display. During viewfinder photography, toggles between the normal information display and an electronic level. Live View/Movie record button Press to toggle Live View on and off. When the camera is in Movie mode, press to start and stop recording. Exposure Compensation button In P, Tv, and Av modes, press while rotating the Main dial to apply Exposure Compensation (adjusts image brightness). In M mode, press while rotating the Main dial to adjust the aperture setting. Q button Activates Quick Control mode, which provides fast access to shooting and playback settings. Press again to exit Quick Control mode. Set button/cross keys During viewfinder shooting, press to access the following settings: top key, White Balance; right key, AF Operation; bottom key, Picture Style; left key, Drive mode. When choosing options from menus and other screens, use the cross keys to highlight an option and then press Set to select that option. AF Area Selection button Press to display the AF Area Selection setting, which controls which autofocus point or zones the camera uses to set focusing distance. ISO button Press to display a screen where you can adjust the ISO setting, which determines how sensitive the camera is to light. DISP button During viewfinder photography, enables you to manually turn the monitor on and off. AE Lock/FE Lock/Index/Reduce button During shooting, press to lock autoexposure (AE) or to lock flash exposure (FE). During playback, press to cycle from single-image view to index (thumbnails) view. If the displayed image or live preview is magnified, press to reduce the magnification level. AF Point Selection/Magnify button During viewfinder photography, press to display the AF Area Selection screen. (You still must use the AF Area Selection button to change the setting.) In Playback mode, press to magnify the image on the monitor. In Live View or Movie mode, you also can magnify the display under certain circumstances. Wi-Fi button Press to display menu screen containing options for configuring wireless connections to a computer, smartphone, or tablet. Erase button While reviewing pictures, press to erase currently displayed or selected photos. Playback button Toggles picture playback on and off. Flash button Press to raise built-in flash in P, Tv, Av, and M modes. When the flash is up, press again to access flash-related menu settings. Depth-of-Field Preview button Press to temporarily set the aperture to the selected f-stop so you can see an approximation of depth of field in the viewfinder. Lens-release button Press to disengage the lens from the camera's lens mount so you can remove the lens.

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Controls on the Canon EOS Rebel T7i/800D Camera

Article / Updated 01-24-2018

If you're not familiar with the T7i/800D camera, here's a quick guide to its buttons, dials, and other external controls. The lens shown here is the 18-55mm kit lens; other lenses may have different features.

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Space: A Commotion of Motion

Article / Updated 11-14-2017

Everything in space is moving and turning. Objects can't sit still. Thanks to gravity, other celestial bodies are always pulling on a star, planet, galaxy, or spacecraft. Some of us are self-centered, but the universe has no center. For example, Earth Turns on its axis — what astronomers call rotating — and takes one day to turn all the way around. Orbits around the Sun — what astronomers call revolving — with one complete orbit taking one year. Travels with the Sun in a huge orbit around the center of the Milky Way. The trip takes about 250 million years to complete once, and the duration of the trip is called the galactic year. Moves with the Milky Way in a trajectory around the center of the Local Group of Galaxies, a couple of dozen galaxies in our neck of the universe. Moves through the universe with the Local Group as part of the Hubble Flow, the general expansion of space caused by the Big Bang. The Big Bang is the event that gave rise to the universe and set space itself expanding at a furious rate. Detailed theories about the Big Bang explain many observed phenomena and have successfully predicted some that hadn't been observed before the theories were circulated. Remember Ginger Rogers? She did everything Fred Astaire did when they danced in the movies, and she did it all backward. Like Ginger and Fred, the Moon follows all the motions of Earth (although not backward), except for Earth's rotation; the Moon rotates more slowly, about once a month. And it performs its tasks while also revolving around Earth (which it does about once a month). And you, as a person on Earth, participate in the motions of rotation, revolution, galactic orbiting, Local Group cruising, and cosmic expansion. You do all that while you drive to work, whether you know it or not. Ask your boss for a little consideration the next time you run a few minutes late.

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How to Shoot a Time-Lapse Movie on the Rebel T7i/800D

Article / Updated 11-14-2017

After you put the Canon EOS Rebel T7i/800D camera in Movie mode, you can access the time-lapse movie feature, which records single frames at periodic intervals and then stitches the frames into a movie. If you're shooting in P, Tv, Av, or M exposure mode, choose Time-Lapse Movie from Shooting Menu 5; in other exposure modes, from Shooting Menu 3. Change the setting from Disable to Enable, which displays the following recording options: Interval and No. of Shots: The first option sets the delay between captures; the second option determines how many frames are captured. You can set that value from 2 to 3600. As you change the interval and number of shots, values at the bottom of the screen indicate how long it will take the camera to record all the frames and the length of the resulting movie. Auto Exposure: Choose Fixed First Frame to record all frames using the exposure settings the camera selects for the first frames. Choose Each Frame if you want the camera to reset exposure before each shot. LCD Auto Off: At the default setting, Disable, the live preview remains on during the first 30 minutes of shooting and then turns off. To save battery power, consider changing the setting to Enable, which turns the monitor off about 10 seconds after the first frame is recorded. Either way, you can press the Info button to turn the monitor on or off during shooting. Beep as Image Taken: When set to Enable, which is the default, the camera beeps after each frame is captured, which is a good way to annoy everyone within earshot. Change the setting to Disable to silence the beep. After exiting the menu screen, frame your shot and the press the shutter button halfway to initiate autofocusing and exposure metering. Make sure that focus is accurate — the camera won't adjust focus between frames. To begin capturing frames, press the Live View button. Recording stops automatically after all frames are captured and the movie is created. For video-spec lovers: Time-lapse movies are created in the MOV format, using the Full HD video setting (1920 x 1080 pixels) at 30 frames per second (for NTSC systems) or 25 frames per second (for PAL systems). Frames are compressed using ALL-I compression rather than the IPB compression used for regular movies.

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Enable Mirror Lockup on the Rebel T7i/800D

Article / Updated 11-14-2017

One component in the optical system of a dSLR camera like the Canon EOS Rebel T7i/800D is a mirror that moves when you press the shutter button. The vibration caused by the mirror movement can result in image blur when you use a very slow shutter speed, shoot with a long telephoto lens, or take extreme close-ups. To eliminate this possibility, your camera offers mirror lockup, which delays the shutter release a little longer than normal so that the picture isn't recorded until after the mirror movement is completed. Of course, you should also mount the camera on a tripod so that camera shake caused by handholding the camera doesn't create blur. You can take advantage of mirror-lockup shooting only in P, Tv, Av, or M exposure mode. Enable it through Custom Function 10, as shown here. Mirror-lockup shooting requires a special picture-taking process: Press the shutter button once to lock up the mirror, release the button, and then press it all the way down again to take the picture.

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Adding Special Effects to Photos with the Rebel T7i/800D

Article / Updated 11-14-2017

During playback, you can add special effects to your photos by using the Creative Filters feature on your Canon EOS Rebel T7i/800D. The camera creates a copy of your image and applies the filter to the copy; your original remains intact. The following figure offers a look at three filter effects along with the original shot. You can choose from these effects: Grainy B/W: Creates a noisy (grainy) black-and-white photo. Soft Focus: Blurs the photo to make it look soft and dreamy. Fish-Eye: Distorts the picture to produce the look of photos taken with a fish-eye lens. Art Bold: Produces a vivid, high-contrast oil-painting effect. Water Painting: Softens colors and focus to mimic the look of a watercolor painting. Toy Camera: Creates an image with dark corners — called a vignette effect. Vignetting is caused by poor-quality lenses, like those found in toy cameras — thus the effect name. You can also add a warm (yellowish) or cool (blue) tint when you apply the filter. Miniature: Blurs all but a very small area of the photo to create a result that looks something like one of those miniature dioramas you see in museums. This effect works best on pictures taken from a high angle, like the one featured. The easiest way to apply the filters is to put the camera in Playback mode, display the photo you want to alter, and then press the Q button to bring up the Quick Control screen. Select the Creative Filters option, as shown on the left, to display symbols representing the available filters at the bottom of the screen. Select a filter and press the Set button (or tap the Set icon) to display a preview of your picture along with options for adjusting the effect, as shown on the right in the figure. For most of the filters, you can increase or decrease the strength of the filter by using the right/left cross keys or tapping directly on the Effect scale. For the Miniature effect, a narrow focus box appears. Move the box over the portion of the photo that you want to keep in sharp focus; press the Info button to change the orientation of the box. If you like what you see, press Set to save the filtered copy as a new file. Or, to cancel out of the operation and check out a different filter, press the Menu button or tap the Menu symbol. You're taken back to the initial filter-selection screen (left screen). You also can get to the special effects by choosing Creative Filters from Playback Menu 1. Scroll to the picture you want to doctor and press Set. From there, everything works as just described.

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Adding Effects During Shooting with the Canon EOS Rebel

Article / Updated 11-14-2017

Set the Mode dial on your Canon EOS Rebel T7i/800D to Creative Filters, as shown in the following figure, to apply effects as you record pictures or movies. (This is the only way to create a movie with effects.) In this case, you don't wind up with an unfiltered original and a special-effects version; you get only the special-effects image or movie. Some effects offered during playback are available during shooting; you also get a few effects not provided during playback. The available effects vary depending on whether you're shooting stills or movies. To explore your options, press the Q button to put the camera in Quick Control mode and then look for the Creative Filters option on the screen. The left side of the following figure shows you where to find the option during viewfinder shooting; the right screen shows the option as it appears during Live View and Movie shooting. After highlighting the Creative Filters option, press Set to display the screen shown in the following figure. Scroll the display up and down to check out all the available effects. When you find one you like, press the Set button to return to the Quick Control screen. For some effects, the screen now offers a second option that enables you to adjust the impact of the filter. For example, the adjustment option for the Grainy Black and White filter is labeled. A few other quick pointers: For still photos, all images are stored in the JPEG format, even if the Image Quality option is set to Raw. During Live View and Movie shooting, you can also access creative effects when the Mode dial is set to P, Tv, Av, or M. Just display the Quick Control screen and look for the Creative Filters symbol on the right side of the screen. The symbol looks like the one that marks the Creative Filters setting on the Mode dial. If the symbol is dimmed, another setting is interfering; for example, you can't apply a filter when the Multi-Shot Noise Reduction option is enabled.

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How to Create Video Snapshots on the Rebel T7i/800D

Article / Updated 11-14-2017

The Video Snapshot feature on the Canon EOS Rebel T7i/800D captures short video clips that are stitched into a single recording, called a video album. You can set the clip length to 8, 4, or 2 seconds long (but all clips in an album must be the same length). Given the brevity of the individual clips, I doubt you'll find much use for this feature. But it's worth mentioning anyway if only to explain that when you put the camera in Movie mode, a Video Snapshot symbol appears, as shown. (If you don't see any data onscreen, press the Info button to change the display style.) To record a snapshot album, press Q to enter Quick Control mode and select the Video Snapshot icon. Exit Quick Control mode and press the Live View button to record the first clip. You're then prompted to create a new album to store the clip or to choose an existing album. After that bit of business is completed, you can record your second clip. By default, the camera records 4-second clips, but you can alter the clip length and set a few other recording choices from the Video Snapshot menu item. In the P, Tv, Av, and M exposure modes, the option is found on Shooting Menu 5; in other modes, Shooting Menu 3. Control audio recording via the normal movie-recording sound options. You can't record normal movies when the Video Snapshot feature is enabled, so be sure to re-enter Quick Control mode to disable it after you create your album.

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