Web Marketing All-in-One For Dummies, 2nd Edition book cover

Web Marketing All-in-One For Dummies, 2nd Edition

By: John Arnold and Michael Becker Published: 07-20-2012

Why buy several books on web marketing when you can buy just one? With this must-have resource, five marketing professionals team up to share their expertise in the field of web marketing so that you can benefit from their know-how. Covering everything from site building, search engine optimization, and web analytics to online advertising, e-mail marketing, and harnessing the potential of social media, this team of web marketing gurus brings their insight and experience to the table and it's yours for the taking.

Articles From Web Marketing All-in-One For Dummies, 2nd Edition

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179 results
179 results
How to Set Up a Netvibes Homepage for Online Marketing

Article / Updated 03-30-2017

Netvibes can be a useful tool to web marketers and you should start by setting up a homepage. If you like a slightly more polished interface, want more customization options, or aren’t comfortable using Google because of privacy concerns (some folks just aren’t), Netvibes is an excellent choice. Setting up a Netvibes homepage takes only five steps: In your web browser, go to Netvibes and sign in or create an account. The basic option works well for your purposes. Enter a topic you’d like to track. Now you’ve got a Dashboard, but it isn’t assigned to an account. To set up your account, click the Sign Up in the upper-right corner. Enter your account information, or sign in using Facebook. Follow the activation instructions for e-mail activation or via Facebook. You’re logged in to your new account. In Netvibes, you have two pages: your public page and your private page. When you first sign up, your public page is turned off. If you turn it on, just be careful that you don’t put any widgets you don’t want anyone else to see on your public page. You’re now ready to start adding widgets that display RSS feeds and other content.

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Web Marketing: How to Avoid Duplicate Content

Article / Updated 03-23-2017

Duplicate content should be avoided in web marketing and Google provides a tool for detecting the repeated information. Nothing hurts a search engine’s quest for relevant content as much as finding the exact same words on two different pages. Duplication is bad for these reasons: Duplication used to be another tactic used to fool the search engines. Webmasters would take one website and replicate it across many different domains, linking them all together. That would fool early search engines into seeing many relevant sites interlinked, and therefore cause the engines to artificially inflate rankings. You don’t want to risk being associated with this tactic — penalties are rare but severe. Duplicate content creates confusion. If a search engine finds the same content on two pages of one site, or two pages on two different sites, it has to basically guess which page should be ranked. Having duplicate words also makes it hard for a search engine to decide which page should be ranked. Other webmasters who link to your content might link to either version. All links to your site are votes. If half of all webmasters link to one page on your site and the other half link to the duplicate, you’ve split your vote and lose authority. Most of the time, duplication is an accident. It’s created by inconsistent linking, bad pagination scripts, or other sloppy website-building practices. Google says that it can handle duplicate content for you. It’s true — Google will often remove duplicates from its index, and it doesn’t penalize you for it. The problem is, though, that Google still has to spend time crawling all of that duplicate stuff. That wastes what’s known as crawl budget, and that hurts your SEO. You can find duplicate content on and off your website by using search engines. To do so, follow these steps: Go to Google and type site:www.yoursiteaddress.com. (Type your actual website address.) Doing this shows all pages from your site that are currently in the Google index. Click through all the result pages. If you get to a message that reads In order to show you the most relevant results, we have omitted some entries very similar. . ., you have pages that Google considers duplicates. Click Repeat the Search with the Omitted Results Included. The additional pages are your duplicates. You can also find duplicate content with a more basic search. Copy one sentence from somewhere on your website. Make sure that it’s not a sentence that others are likely to use. On Google, search for that sentence, in quotations marks. Google returns all pages in its index that include those words, in that order. This lets you find other sites that have copied your writing as well as pages on your own website that are duplicates of each other. No matter how hard you try, you can never create a site that is 100 percent duplication free — it’s impossible. The important thing is to make sure that you don’t duplicate entire pages or sets of pages from one page to the next or, even worse, one website to another.

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How to Place an Mobile Marketing Opt In Call to Action

Article / Updated 02-09-2017

In mobile marketing, a request for an opt-in is called an opt-in call to action. You can place an opt-in call to action in any traditional, new, and mobile media channel, including the following: Television Print Radio Point-of-sale displays Face-to-face encounters Outdoor advertising A web or mobile Internet site An e-mail A customer-care call Online advertising A dialog pop-up setting in a downloadable application How to dial and press Dialing and pressing is all about using the voice channel of the mobile phone. You can encourage people to call a phone number by asking them to “Dial 1-800-XXX-XXXX to experience the sounds of the movie” or “Call 408-XXX-XXXX to listen in on the game,” for example. You don’t have to answer the calls yourself; you can use an IVR system to ask the caller to make selections. Selection options in an IVR session could be “Press 1 to receive a ringtone,” “Press 2 to get your last five transactions,” or “Press 3 to get the movie listings sent to your phone.” How to use text Texting simply means sending and replying to a standard alphanumeric or multimedia message. You can place the call to action in traditional, new, and mobile media by saying something like “Text win to 12345 to enter the sweepstakes.” You can also obtain a mobile subscriber’s opt-in via texting. Mobile marketing programs and any other programs that use text messaging (such as IVR, Internet, mobile Internet, or applications) must use a CSC to address and route text or multimedia message traffic. How to snap and scan Snapping and scanning means taking a picture and scanning a bar code — nearly every phone today has a camera on it. The camera is a wonderful tool for gathering opt-ins. You can instruct audience members to take a picture of an object — a soft-drink can, a magazine ad, or others that have clearly defined edges — then instruct them to use a scanning application or e-mail/text the picture to your mobile marketing program. When your program receives a picture, it processes the picture and opts the subscriber in to your program. How to submit Another great way to invite someone into your mobile marketing program is to present a form on an Internet page or a mobile Internet page, or in an installed application. Dial an abbreviated code Two companies — Zoove under the brand StarStar and Single Touch — have developed two alternative opt-in channels; they invite you to place calls prefaced with ** and ##. Zoove’s method uses the star (*) key on the mobile phone. A mobile subscriber on the Sprint network, for example, can press **267 — that is, **AOL — and the Send/Talk button on his phone (typically, the green button). In return, an AOL promotional mobile Internet site is sent to the phone. Single Touch’s solution works the same way but uses the pound (#) key instead. Both services are still limited in their deployment across wireless carriers, but you can see the possibilities of these methods of opt-in. How to execute opt-ins To leverage text messaging, you need to be familiar with two important text-messaging opt-in classifications: Mobile originated (MO): A mobile subscriber composes (originates) a message on her phone and sends it to you. Mobile terminated (MT): A message goes from an application provider’s service to a mobile phone, so the message ends (terminates) on the phone. How to execute a single opt-in In a single opt-in, someone sends in an MO and you send an MT back confirming the opt-in. For subscription alerts or ongoing programs, very few carriers support single opt-ins. Mostly, this process is used for one-time interactions; when the initial interaction is done, no future interactions will occur. How to execute a double opt-in A double opt-in is typically used to gather an individual’s confirmation. The flow is straightforward: The user opts in to the program. The mobile marketing application responds with a text message that asks for confirmation (“Reply y to 12345,” for example). The user sends the confirmation. The mobile marketing application processes the request and sends back a welcome message (such as “Thank you. You’re now in the group. To opt out, reply stop, or for help, reply help”). How to execute a multistep opt-in You use multistep opt-in when you want to challenge consumers with additional questions before they can participate in your program. For example, you may ask users for their ages if you’re running a program suitable only for users 17 and older. After a user responds to the additional challenges, the interaction may end, or you may follow up by triggering a double opt-in to get expressed consent for future marketing.

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Web Marketing All-in-One For Dummies Cheat Sheet

Cheat Sheet / Updated 03-27-2016

Web marketing encompasses a wide range of electronic means to get your product in front of potential customers. Market your product through your business's website, through other people's websites, in their e-mail, or on their phones — nearly everywhere. Market your goods and services effectively by using tools like such as strong SEO terms and pay per click, and by analyzing your marketing campaign every day.

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Web Marketing: How to Find “Dead” Pages

Step by Step / Updated 03-27-2016

As a web marketer, finding “dead” pages will help keep your site running properly. Your site may have pages search engines never seem to find. Those pages may be buried deep in your site navigation, or you may have search roadblocks that shut out the search robots. Whatever the case, dead pages are missed opportunities. Ideally, every page on your site has value, and every page on your site gets indexed. Finding dead pages is the first step to getting dead pages back into the index. Here’s a quick way to do it:

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Web Marketing: How to Retrieve Referrer Data

Step by Step / Updated 03-27-2016

Most web marketing reporting tools don’t show referrer data front and center on the main dashboard. You need to drill down to find and retrieve it. Using Google Analytics as an example, the following walks you through the steps of finding your referring sites and introduces the common metrics you see along with those sites. Although the following steps focus on Google Analytics, you can use these basic steps to work with most reporting tools. To find your referrals, follow these steps:

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How to Adjust Web Marketing Keyword Lists in MSN adCenter

Step by Step / Updated 03-27-2016

MSN adCenter can be a useful tool for web marketers. After you gain experience, you may want to adjust your keyword list. When you created your account, you may have chosen to accept the default options when you entered your initial keyword list. If you did, the match type was broad and the maximum CPC was applied to all keywords in that ad group. You can always go back and set separate bids for specific keywords or change the overall maximum CPC. You can enable incremental bidding and target users by gender or age by increasing your bid when MSN detects a user in your desired demographic (age, gender, or time of day). To adjust your keyword list or use the incremental bidding tool, follow these steps:

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Essential Pay-Per-Click Terms for Web Marketing

Article / Updated 03-26-2016

Pay per click (PPC) is a popular web marketing tool: You place an ad on a website, pay the site owner for each click-through (that is, every visitor who clicks through to your site), and enjoy the exposure. Like everything else, PPC has its own jargon, which the following list can help you sort through: ad group: Where and how your ads and keyword lists are organized. campaign: Where your ad groups are organized; budgets for spending are set; and other settings are made, such as geography, frequency, and networks. CPC (cost per click): The amount you pay each time your ad is clicked. CTR (click-through rate): The percentage of how many times your ad was clicked, divided by how many times it was shown. destination URL: The address of the web page that your ads go to. display URL: The web address displayed in your PPC ad. impressions: How many times your ad was shown. keyword: The words and phrases you select to bid on. match type: Determines how specifically you want the search engine to match a searcher's query to your keyword list. The types are broad, phrase, exact, negative, and modified broad. maximum CPC: The dollar amount you set that you are willing to pay for each time your ad is clicked.

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How to Use E-Mail as a Web Marketing Strategy

Article / Updated 03-26-2016

Reaching potential customers by e-mail can be a very effective web marketing strategy. An e-mail marketing campaign can be detrimental, however, without some guidelines. Before you send your marketing e-mail, make sure that . . . You have explicit permission to send the e-mail. Your e-mail is CAN-SPAM-compliant. You pinpoint the main objective. Your From line clearly identifies your business. Your Subject line prompts your audience to open your e-mail. Your e-mail content is easy to scan. Your headlines are short, clear, and concise. Your e-mail contains a strong call to action. Your images help tell the story of your e-mail. Your e-mail content is relevant and valuable to your audience. You've checked all links to make sure they work properly. You're prepared to handle inbound responses. You're sending at a time when your audience is likely to notice.

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Tips for Marketing to Mobile Users

Article / Updated 03-26-2016

A complete web marketing strategy makes use of all electronic media, including mobile phones and other devices. Some keys to mobile marketing success include these pointers: Don't be blinded by youth. Mobile marketing is applicable to all ages. Provide value, and everyone benefits. Set objectives and success measures. Before you start, know why you're running a program and what you want to accomplish. Plan for every customer lifecycle. Mobile applies to awareness, acquisition, loyalty and retention, customer care, and retirement. Get permission and build trust. Always get permission first from mobile subscribers before engaging them on their mobile phone. Take your time and test it. Give yourself time to test your mobile marketing initiatives and have them certified by the wireless carriers when necessary. Start now; don't wait to learn. Mobile is becoming a primary channel for customer engagement, so learn to use it now! Be creative. Mobile subscribers want value, information, and entertainment. Don't limit yourself to just holding steady. Launch your mobile marketing programs, test them, review the measures, and then do it better next time. Mobile marketing, like any other practice, takes time to learn.

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