Office 2016 All-in-One For Dummies book cover

Office 2016 All-in-One For Dummies

By: Peter Weverka Published: 11-02-2015

The fast and easy way to get things done with Office

Perplexed by PowerPoint? Looking to excel at Excel? From Access to Word—and every application in between—this all-encompassing guide provides plain-English guidance on mastering the entire Microsoft Office suite. Through easy-to-follow instruction, you'll quickly get up and running with Excel, Word, PowerPoint, Outlook, Access, Publisher, Charts and Graphics, OneNote, and more—and make your work and home life easier, more productive, and more streamlined.

Microsoft Office is the leading productivity tool in the world. From word processing to business communication to data crunching, it requires a lot of knowledge to operate it—let alone master it. Luckily, Office 2016 All-in-One For Dummies is here to deliver the breadth of information you need to complete basic tasks and drill down into Office's advanced features.

  • Create customized documents and add graphic elements, proofing, and citations in Word
  • Build a worksheet, create formulas, and perform basic data analysis in Excel
  • Create a notebook and organize your thoughts in Notes
  • Manage messages, tasks, contacts, and calendars in Outlook

Clocking in at over 800 pages, Office 2016 All-in-One For Dummies will be the singular Microsoft Office resource you'll turn to again and again.

Articles From Office 2016 All-in-One For Dummies

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68 results
68 results
How to Share Files with Others with OneDrive

Article / Updated 09-14-2021

If you share your Office 2016 files with others, they can view or edit your work. Sharing is a great way to collaborate with others on Office files. Starting in the OneDrive window, you can share a folder (and therefore, all the files in the folder) or an individual file. Inviting people by email Follow these steps to share a file (or all the files in a folder) by sending out an email message with links to the files. File sharing by email. All the recipient of your email message has to do to read or view the file is click a link. In OneDrive, select the file or folder you want to share. Click the Share button. You can find the Share button on the OneDrive toolbar along the top of the screen. As shown, you see the Share window. If you're sharing the file or folder already, the sharers' names appear on the left side of the window. Choose Invite People. Enter the email addresses of the people with whom you will share the file or folder. Enter a message as well, if you want. If you want the recipients of your email invitation to be able to view the files without subscribing to Office 365, click the Share button now; otherwise, keep reading. Click the Recipients Can Edit link. As shown, drop-down menus appear. Choose access privileges on the drop-down menus. On the first menu, choose whether recipients can view the file(s) or view and edit the file(s). You've got the power here — use it wisely! On the second menu, choose whether recipients need an Office 365 subscription to view or view and edits the file(s). Click the Share button. The Share window opens. It tells you who shares the file or folder with you. You can return to this window at any time to unshare files or folders as well as change how files and folders are shared. Generating a link to shared files Follow these instructions to share a file (or all the files in a folder) by generating a hyperlink. After OneDrive generates the link, you can post it or send it to others. Anyone who clicks the link can view (or view and edit) the file. In the OneDrive window, select the file or folder you want to share. Click the Share button. As shown here, you see the Share window for generating a link to your file or folder. File sharing by generating a link. Choose Get a Link. Choose an access option on the drop-down menu. Here are your choices: View Only: Others can view the file (or all files in the folder if a folder is being shared), but not edit the file(s). Edit: Others can view and edit the file (or all files in the folder if a folder is being shared). Click Create Link. OneDrive generates the link. You can click Shorten Link to generate a shorter and more manageable version of the link. Select the link (double-click it). Right-click the link and choose Copy. You can now paste the link where you will — to a blog, web page, or email message. Happy sharing!

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Edit a Video in PowerPoint 2016

Article / Updated 06-05-2016

To help launch your movie career, PowerPoint 2016 offers a handful of video-editing tools on the (Video Tools) Format and (Video Tools) Playback tabs. Select your video and experiment with these tools to see whether you can improve upon it: Fading in and fading out: To make the video fade in or out, visit the (Video Tools) Playback tab and enter a time measurement in the Fade In and Fade Out boxes. For example, entering 5.00 in the Fade In box makes the video fade in during the first 5 seconds. Trimming the start or end from a video: On the (Video Tools) Playback tab, click the Trim Video button to trim off the beginning or end of a video. You see the Trim Video dialog box. On the timeline bar, drag the start marker and end marker toward the center of the timeline and click OK. What is between the markers remains in the video. To restore cuts you made to a video, click the Trim Video button and drag markers in the Trim Video dialog box. Improving the brightness and contrast: On the (Video Tools) Format tab, click the Corrections button and see whether you can get a better picture by selecting an option on the drop-down list. Choose Video Corrections Options if you have the wherewithal to play with the brightness and contrast settings in the Format Video dialog box. Recoloring a video: On the (Video Tools) Format tab, click the Color button and choose a color option on the drop-down list if doing so improves the look of your video.

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In Outlook 2016, Be Alerted Only When You Get Email from Specific People

Article / Updated 06-05-2016

By default when an email message arrives in Outlook 2016, a bunch of things happen. You hear a ding; a little envelope appears in the notification area to the left of the Windows clock; and a pop-up desktop alert appears with the sender's name, the message's subject, and the text of the message. Quite a fireworks show! But if you receive numerous messages, these email alerts can be distracting. Rather than be alerted whenever an email message arrives, you can be alerted only when messages arrive from specific people. You can be alerted only when the Master of the Universe or another important person sends you an email message. The messages appear in the New Mail Alerts dialog box, where you can select a message and click the Open Item button to read it. To be alerted in Outlook 2016 when you get messages from certain people, start by turning off all email alerts: On the File tab, choose Options to open the Outlook Options dialog box. Go to the Mail category. In the Message Arrival area, deselect all settings (Play a Sound, Briefly Change the Mouse Pointer, Show an Envelope Icon in the Taskbar, Display a Desktop Alert). Click OK to close the Outlook Options dialog box. Your next task is to create a rule so that email alerts appear when you receive messages from a certain someone. Follow these steps to tell Outlook 2016 that you want to know when you get email messages from an important person: Find a message from the important person and right-click it to display the shortcut menu. On the shortcut menu, choose Rules→Create Rule. The Create Rule dialog box appears. Make sure the first check box is selected. It lists the important person's name or email address. Deselect the Subject Contains check box. Select the Sent To check box and, on the drop-down menu, tell Office 2016 whether you want to be alerted when the arriving message was sent to several people or the arriving message was sent to you alone: To be alerted when the message was sent to several people, choose the first option on the menu (the sender's email address) To be alerted when the message was sent to you only, choose Me Only. Select Display in the New Item Alert Window to list the messages in the New Mail Alerts dialog box when messages arrive. Select Play a Selected Sound to hear a sound when messages arrive. Click OK to close the Create Rule dialog box. Repeat these steps for each important person you know. To change or delete a rule, including a rule about new mail alerts, go to the Home tab, click the Rules button, and choose Manage Rules & Alerts on the button menu. On the Email Rules tab of the Rules and Alerts dialog box, select a rule, and then change or delete it.

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In Word 2016, Mark Index Entries with a Concordance File

Article / Updated 06-05-2016

Word 2016 offers the Index command for indexing a document (mark entries for the index and click the Insert Index button on the References tab). If you're in a hurry, if you don't have the time to mark index entries one by one in a document, you can mark index entries with another, simpler means. You can mark index entries by using a concordance file. A concordance file is a two-column table with words to look for in the document and their corresponding index entries. The words in the left-hand column of the table are the ones that Word 2016 searches for and marks for the index. When Word 2016 finds a word that is listed in the left-hand column, it records the corresponding text in the right-hand column as the index entry along with the page number on which the word is found. With the concordance file method of indexing, you can't include page ranges for entries or enter a cross-reference in your index. Follow these steps to use the concordance file method to mark entries for an index: In a new Word 2016 document, create a two-column table. In the left-hand column, type text from your document that you want Word to mark for index entries. What you enter in the left-hand column is not the index entry itself — just the topic of the entry. For example, to make an index entry on Thomas Mann, type Mann in the left-hand column to tell Word to look for all occurrences of that name. To be indexed, words in your document must be exact matches of the words in the left-hand column. For example, if you type eagle steel works in the left-hand column of the concordance file table but the name is "Eagle Steel Works" (with each word capitalized) in your document, the topic won't be indexed because Word won't recognize it. In the right-hand column, type the index entries. For example, to create an index entry called "Mann, Thomas," type Mann, Thomas. You can create subentries by using a colon (:). For example, to make "Mann, Thomas, early life" a subentry of "Mann, Thomas," enter Mann, Thomas:early life. A fast way to create a concordance file is to open the document with the text you are indexing along with the concordance file On the View tab, click the Arrange All button to put both documents onscreen at once, and copy text from the document to the left-hand column of the concordance file. Save the concordance file when you finish entering the words and phrases to mark in the left-hand column and the index entries in the right-hand column. Your next step is to use the concordance file to mark index entries in your document. Open the document that needs an index. On the References tab, click the Insert Index button. The Index dialog box opens. Click the AutoMark button. You see the Open Index AutoMark File dialog box. Find the concordance file (you saved it in Step 4), select it, and click the Open button. Throughout your document, field codes appear where the concordance file marked entries for the index. These codes are marked with the letters XE. (You can hide the ugly field codes by clicking the Show/Hide ¶ button on the Home tab.) To generate an index after you mark the index entries, place the cursor where you want the index to appear, go to the References tab, click the Insert Index button, and click OK in the Index dialog box.

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Turn One Data Column into Two in Excel 2016

Article / Updated 06-05-2016

It sometimes happens in an Excel 2016 worksheet that you need to turn one column of data into two columns. In the case of names, for example, it might be necessary to turn a column of names into two columns, one called first name and one called last name. Follow these steps in an Excel 2016 worksheet to turn one column of data into two columns of data: Select the data that needs dividing into two columns. On the Data tab, click the Turn to Columns button. The Convert Text to Columns Wizard appears. Choose the Delimited option (if it isn't already chosen) and click Next. Under Delimiters, choose the option that defines how you will divide the data into two columns. Choose Space, for example, to divide a name column into a first name and last name column. The Data Preview box shows what the data will look like when it is divided into two columns. Click Next. Click Finish.

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How to Translate Foreign Language Text in Word 2016

Article / Updated 06-05-2016

Office 2016 offers a gizmo for translating words and phrases from one language to another. The translation gizmo gives you the opportunity to translate single words and phrases as well as entire documents, although it is only good for translating words and phrases. To translate an entire document, you have to seek the help of a real, native speaker. Follow these steps to translate foreign language text: Select the word or phrase that needs translating. On the Review tab, click the Translate button and choose a Translate option on the drop-down list. Office offers these ways to translate words: Translate Document: Word sends the text to Microsoft Translator, a translation service, and the translated text appears on a web page. Copy the text and do what you will with it. (If the wrong translation languages are listed, choose correct languages from the drop-down lists on the top of the web page.) Translate Selected Text: The Research task pane opens, as shown here. Choose a From and To option to translate the word from one language to another. Use the Research task pane to translate a word or phrase.

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How to Merge and Split Table Cells in Word 2016

Article / Updated 06-05-2016

Merge and split cells to make your Word 2016 tables a little more elegant than run-of-the-mill tables. Merge cells to break down the barriers between cells and join them into one cell; split cells to divide a single cell into several cells (or several cells into several more cells). In the table shown, cells in rows and columns have been split or merged to create a curious-looking little table. Merge and split cells to create unusual tables. Select the cells you want to merge or split, go to the (Table Tools) Layout tab, and follow these instructions to merge or split cells: Merging cells: Click the Merge Cells button (you can also right-click and choose Merge Cells). Splitting cells: Click the Split Cells button (you can also right-click and choose Split Cells). In the Split Cells dialog box, declare how many columns and rows you want to split the cell into and then click OK. Another way to merge and split cells is to click the Draw Table or Eraser button on the (Table Tools) Layout tab. Click the Draw Table button and then draw lines through cells to split them. Click the Eraser button and drag over or click the boundary between cells to merge cells. Press Esc when you finish drawing or erasing table cell boundaries. Need to split a table? Place the cursor in what you want to be the first row of the new table, go to the (Table Tools) Layout tab, and click the Split Table button.

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How to Insert an Online Video into a Document in Word 2016

Article / Updated 06-05-2016

When words and pictures don't do the job, consider making video a part of your Word 2016 document with the Online Video command. This command establishes a link between your document and a video on the Internet. You see the first frame of the video in the Word document, as shown here. Clicking the Play button in this frame opens a video viewer so you can play the video. Making video part of a Word document. To insert an online video in a document, go to the Insert tab and click the Online Video button. The Insert Video dialog box appears. Use it to search for an online video with the Bing search engine, search for an online video at YouTube, or enter the video's online address. As shown, the search results window gives you the opportunity to preview a video by clicking the View Larger button.

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How to Work with Text Boxes in Word 2016

Article / Updated 06-05-2016

Put text in a text box when you want a notice or announcement to stand out on a Word 2016 page. Like other objects, text boxes can be shaded, filled with color, and given borders, as the examples shown demonstrate. You can also lay them over graphics to make for interesting effects. The borders and the fill color from the text box on the right side of the figure have been removed, but rest assured, the text in this figure lies squarely in a text box. Examples of text boxes. You can move a text box around at will on the page until it lands in the right place. You can even use text boxes as columns and make text jump from one text box to the next in a document — a nice feature, for example, when you want a newsletter article on page 1 to be continued on page 2. Instead of cutting and pasting text from page 1 to page 2, Word moves the text for you as the column on page 1 fills up. Inserting a text box To create a text box, go to the Insert tab, click the Text Box button, and use one of these techniques: Choose a ready-made text box: Scroll in the drop-down list and choose a preformatted text box. Draw a conventional text box: Choose Draw Text Box on the drop-down list, and then click and drag to draw the text box. Lines show you how big it will be when you release the mouse button. After you insert the text box, you can type text in it and call on all the formatting commands on the (Drawing) Format tab. It also describes how to turn a shape such as a circle or triangle into a text box (create the shape, right-click it and choose Add Text, and start typing). Here's a neat trick: You can turn the text in a text box on its side so that it reads from top to bottom or bottom to top, not from left to right. Create a text box, enter the text, go to the (Drawing Tools) Format tab, click the Text Direction button, and choose a Rotate option on the drop-down list. Making text flow from text box to text box You can link text boxes so that the text in the first box is pushed into the next one when it fills up. To link text boxes, start by creating all the text boxes that you need. You cannot link one text box to another if the second text box already has text in it. Starting on the (Drawing Tools) Format tab, follow these directions to link text boxes: Creating a forward link: Click a text box and then click the Create Link button to create a forward link. The pointer changes into a very odd-looking pointer that is supposed to look like a pitcher. Move the odd-looking pointer to the next text box in the chain and click there to create a link. Breaking a link: To break a link, click the text box that is to be the last in the chain, and then click the Break Link button.

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How to Use the Research Task Pane in Word 2016

Article / Updated 06-05-2016

Thanks to the Research task pane in Word 2016, your desk needn't be as crowded as before. The Research task pane offers dictionaries, foreign language dictionaries, a thesaurus, language translators, and encyclopedias, as well as Internet searching, all available from inside Word (and the other Office programs too). As shown here, the Research task pane can save you a trip to the library. The Research task pane is like a mini reference library. The task pane offers menus and buttons for steering a search in different directions, but no matter what you want to research in the Research task pane, start your search the same way: Either click in a word or select the words that you want to research. For example, if you want to translate a word, click it. Clicking a word or selecting words saves you the trouble of entering words in the Search For text box, but if no word in your document describes what you want to research, don't worry about it. You can enter the subject of your search later. Alt+click the word or words you want to research. (In Excel and PowerPoint, you can also click the Research button on the Review tab.) The Research task pane appears. If you've researched since you started running Word, the options you chose for your last research project appear in the task pane. Enter a research term in the Search For text box (if one isn't there already). Open the Search For drop-down list and tell Word where to steer your search. Choose a reference book or research website. Click the Start Searching button (or press Enter). The results of your search appear in the Research task pane. If your search yields nothing worthwhile or nothing at all, scroll to the bottom of the task pane and try the All Reference Books or All Research Sites link. The first link searches all reference books — the dictionaries, thesauruses, and translation service. The second searches research sites — Bing, Factiva iWorks, and HighBeam Research. You can retrace a search by clicking the Back button or Forward button in the Research task pane. These buttons work like the Back and Forward buttons in a web browser.

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