Diabetes Cookbook For Dummies book cover

Diabetes Cookbook For Dummies

By: Alan L. Rubin and Cait James Published: 01-27-2015

Discover how to eat a well-balanced diabetic diet

Diabetes Cookbook For Dummies gives you everything you need to create healthy and diabetic-friendly meals. In this revised and updated edition, you'll discover how easy it is to manage diabetes through diet. With tons of new recipes—many of them vegetarian—and the latest information on diabetes testing, monitoring, and maintenance, this book will help guide you down a path to a healthier you.

With an anticipated price tag close to $3.4 billion annually by the year 2020, diabetes is one of the costliest health hazards in the U.S. If you're one of the 25.8 million Americans suffering from diabetes, this hands-on, friendly guide arms you with the most up-to-date nutritional information and shows you how to start cooking—and eating—your way to better health.

  • Offers 100+ new and revised diabetic recipes for every meal of the day
  • Features changes in fat, carbohydrate, and protein recommendations that parallel the meal plan recommendations of the American Diabetes Association
  • Covers how to make smart choices when eating out, shopping for food, and setting up a diabetic kitchen
  • Introduces ways to involve diabetic children in meal planning and preparation

If you're diabetic and want to learn how to make lifestyle changes that count, Diabetes Cookbook For Dummies shows you how the food you eat can help treat, prevent, and manage diabetes.

Articles From Diabetes Cookbook For Dummies

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47 results
47 results
10 Simple Steps to Change Your Eating Habits

Step by Step / Updated 04-24-2017

Following a nutritional plan sometimes seems so complicated. But really, if you follow the few simple rules outlined here, you can make the process much easier. None of them cost anything other than time. Doing them one at a time makes a big difference in your calorie and fat intake. Adding one after another makes the results huge. Your weight, blood pressure, and blood glucose all fall. Who could ask for anything more?

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10 Strategies for Teaching Kids Healthy Eating Habits

Step by Step / Updated 03-09-2017

Children don’t hate vegetables any more than they hate ice cream. It is what you teach them that determines their feelings about food. If you show them that you love vegetables and consider them delicious, that’s how they will feel about vegetables. They love to follow your example. The best time to do this is at family meals. Following are ten of the numerous things you can do to encourage your child to eat vegetables.

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10 Simple Steps to Adopting a Mediterranean Diet

Step by Step / Updated 06-24-2016

You may think that giving up the diet you’ve followed all your life in favor of the Mediterranean diet requires a major upheaval in your lifestyle. The process may not be simple, but you aren’t giving up good taste. You’ll enjoy the diet — and your blood glucose, blood pressure, cholesterol, and weight will all take a turn for the better. Here are ten ways to go from your current diet to the Mediterranean diet.

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Diabetes Cookbook For Dummies Cheat Sheet

Cheat Sheet / Updated 06-02-2016

When you have diabetes, you need to monitor your health closely — including what you eat, how much you eat, and how much you should eat. Managing diabetes means knowing your ideal weight, body mass index (BMI), and kilocalorie intake; maintaining healthy eating habits; and recognizing food terms that indicate fat content.

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Food Terms that Indicate Fat Content

Article / Updated 03-26-2016

Managing diabetes means controlling the amount of fat that you eat. Food terms in recipes and menu items can help you identify high-fat and low-fat foods. Understanding these terms will help you determine which foods and recipes to avoid. These terms indicate a low fat content: Baked Broiled Cooked in its own juice Poached These terms indicate a high fat content: Buttered or in butter sauce Creamed or in cream sauce Deep fried Fried In cheese sauce In plum sauce Sautéed Sweet and sour

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Living with Diabetes: How to Improve Eating Habits

Article / Updated 03-26-2016

You can take simple steps to improve your eating habits for healthier living with diabetes. Follow these simple tips to make a difference in your health: Keep a food diary. Figure out why you eat the way that you do. Avoid missing a meal; eat at regular times. Sit down for meals. Use water in place of caloric drinks. Include vegetables in all meals. Cook with half the fat you usually use. Remove all visible fat. Don’t add salt. Flavor with condiments, herbs, and spices. Cook by the B’s: Braise, broil, or boil. Follow portion sizes. To determine the size of a portion, compare it to something you see regularly. For example: Three ounces of meat is the size of a deck of cards. A medium fruit is the size of a tennis ball. A medium potato is the size of a computer mouse. A medium bagel is the size of a hockey puck. An ounce of cheese is the size of a domino. A cup of fruit is the size of a baseball. A cup of broccoli is the size of a light bulb.

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Figure Your Ideal Weight, BMI, and Kilocalorie Intake

Article / Updated 03-26-2016

If you're diabetic, you should understand that your body weight, body mass index (BMI), and kilocalorie intake affect the way you manage your diabetes. So take the following steps to calculate your ideal weight, BMI, and kilocalorie intake: Weight: Follow these general rules for calculating your ideal weight. (The range of appropriate weights is the ideal weight plus or minus 10 percent.): A man needs to weigh 106 pounds for 5 feet and 6 pounds more for every inch higher than 5 feet. A woman needs to weigh 100 pounds for 5 feet and 5 pounds more for every inch higher than 5 feet. Body mass index (BMI) determines a person’s body weight relative to height. This number is a good indicator of the amount of fat in your body. To obtain your BMI, Multiply your weight in pounds by 703. Divide this number by your height in inches. Divide again by your height in inches. Body mass index: A BMI under 18 is slim, 20 to 25 is normal, 25 to 30 is overweight, and greater than 30 is obese. Kilocalorie intake: To figure your daily kilocalorie needs to maintain your ideal weight, Multiply your ideal weight in pounds by 10. If you get no exercise, multiply the result of Step 1 by 10 percent or 0.1. If you exercise moderately, multiply the result of Step 1 by 20 percent or 0.2. If you get heavy exercise, multiply this number by 40 percent or 0.4. Add the result of Step 2 to the result of Step 1.

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10 Myths About Diabetes

Article / Updated 03-26-2016

As you go through life with diabetes, you'll be exposed to many "experts" and different ideas about the best way to manage your disease. Before you make a major change in your diabetes program, run the new ideas by your doctor or diabetes educator to make sure it will help and not hurt you. Here are a few of the more common myths about diabetes — save yourself some grief and ignore them. People with diabetes shouldn't exercise. This myth probably arose from the rare person with diabetes who has severe eye disease and probably shouldn't jar his or her eyes. For the vast majority of people with diabetes, the truth is the opposite. Exercise is one of the best ways to help bring your diabetes under control. People with diabetes can only engage in moderate exercise, like walking. The large number of people with diabetes who are professional athletes should be all the proof you need that, with proper precautions, including checking with your doctor before you begin high-intensity exercise, you can do any level of exercise you desire (and it will further improve your diabetes). If in doubt about whether a form of exercise is safe for you, as always, talk with your doctor. People with diabetes can't get life insurance. This myth can easily be proven false by checking with a few insurance companies. They'll be more than happy to accept your premium for insurance. Needing insulin shots means you're at the end of your disease. In fact, insulin is often used early in diabetes to get control of blood glucose. Many patients on insulin can come off it with just lifestyle changes. Insulin is just another tool for good diabetes care. Low blood glucose kills brain cells. Studies have shown that adults who have low blood glucose have no loss of mental functioning. Children whose brains are still developing need to be protected from low blood glucose, however. Eating a piece of cake is dangerous. Sure, your blood glucose may go a little higher, but you can easily bring it down with exercise or medication. An occasional slip is not irreversible. If you take your medicine, follow a healthy diet, and get enough exercise, your glucose will be perfect every time. So many things go into determining your blood glucose, including your mental state and menses (for menstruating women), that you shouldn't be surprised if an occasional blood glucose measurement is out of the acceptable range. There are simple cures for diabetes like acupuncture, yoga, or chromium. Unfortunately, to date there are no simple cures for diabetes. If one is found, you'll hear about it. Until then, it's diet, exercise, and medication. You can't be spontaneous when you have diabetes. The fact is, you can live your life much like the person without diabetes, but the addition of a better diet and plenty of exercise will probably make you healthier than your friend who doesn't have diabetes. Diabetes is inherited. Type 1 diabetes is rarely found in two members of the same family. Type 2 diabetes does run in families but that has more to do with family dietary habits and lack of exercise than heredity. You are not to blame if your child develops diabetes, and you can't pin your diabetes on your parents.

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Exercise and Diabetes

Article / Updated 03-26-2016

Exercise is a key part of the foundation for the management of diabetes (the other parts of the foundation are diet and medication). Everyone with diabetes should exercise, but be sure to check with your doctor if any of the following apply to you: You have complications of diabetes like eye disease, kidney disease, nerve disease, or heart disease. You're obese. You have a physical limitation of some kind. You have high blood pressure. You're on medication. To make exercise safe and healthful, follow these tips: Wear an ID bracelet stating that you have type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Test your blood glucose often — before, during, and after exercise. Choose proper socks and proper-fitting shoes. Drink plenty of water before, during, and after exercise. Carry treatment for low blood glucose with you at all times. Exercise with a buddy. Reduce your insulin dose and/or eat some carbs before you exercise. If you're wondering when you should exercise, the answer is: any time you'll do it faithfully. Some people are morning exercisers, and other people prefer exercising in the evening. The time of day you exercise doesn't matter — the key is to do it! The American Diabetes Association recommends 150 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic exercise spread out over at least three days per week, with no more than two consecutive days passing without exercise. Whether you should do more than that depends on your goals — maybe you want to lose weight, become a champion racer or swimmer, or just maintain a healthy mental state. As you exercise more, you'll become better conditioned, but if your exercise is somewhat hard for you to do, you're working out at the right intensity. Resistance exercise (like weight lifting) is just as good as aerobic exercise for your diabetes. Just be careful not to do so much that you injure yourself and have to stop.

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Living the Good Life: The Mediterranean Lifestyle and Diabetes

Article / Updated 03-26-2016

Although diet is an essential part of the Mediterranean lifestyle, there is much more to it than just the diet. Most of the way that people live their lives is consistent with prevention or amelioration of diabetes. Many other behaviors that make up the Mediterranean lifestyle contribute to the long, healthy lives of people who live in the Mediterranean region. Taking a run on the beach in the morning, a stroll around town, or a brisk walk in the evening is typical. People in the Mediterranean also use their bicycles to get around a lot more than Americans typically do. Exercise is a key part of the prevention and management of diabetes. The mild winters and the long hot summers of the Mediterranean make the outdoor lifestyle a lot easier, too. In the Mediterranean, the "eat and run" concept is unheard of. Stores close in the middle of the hot day, and people return home for a long lunch, during which they chew their food slowly and don't watch TV or check their email. They may have a glass of red wine with their lunch. Often there are guests and conversations ensue, which everyone enjoys. Conversation also slows down the pace of eating. Their bodies are given time to feel full so people tend to eat less. Eating less leads to more normal weight, another key part of the prevention and management of diabetes. And, of course, they cook their own food. Relaxing with friends also reduces stress and increases longevity. It's part of what makes life worth living. Stress reduction is another essential part of the prevention and treatment of diabetes. When you relax, you don't secrete the hormones like cortisol that tend to raise your blood glucose. Another important aspect of the Mediterranean lifestyle is the tendency to take a nap. The long lunch and the glass of wine lead to a calm feeling that makes you tired even though, typically, people in the Mediterranean area don't set clocks to wake themselves early in the morning. Rest is not only good for diabetes but for your blood pressure and your heart. Although the benefits of the Mediterranean diet are greatest when eaten as a part of a total lifestyle, you don't need to move to Greece or Italy to profit from it. You can adopt the diet and follow these tips to immerse yourself in the lifestyle: Take a walk after dinner every night. Tell yourself you're going for a passeggiata (an evening stroll), and maybe you'll feel like an Italian! Walk or ride your bike instead of driving, at least for errands closer to home. Make an effort to eat slowly, at a table, free of distractions. Invite friends to join you in conversation, or if you're dining alone, listen to some relaxing music. Cap off your meal with a glass of red wine. Take an afternoon nap to stay rested. And make sure to get enough sleep every night. Aim for eight hours. Plan a two-week trip to the Mediterranean coast of Greece if you can. If that's not in your budget, rent Mamma Mia! and imagine yourself dancing the night away with Meryl Streep.

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