YouTube Channels For Dummies book cover

YouTube Channels For Dummies

By: Rob Ciampa and Theresa Go Published: 09-01-2020

Create a YouTube channel that draws subscribers with top-notch content 

YouTube has the eyes and ears of two billion monthly users. YouTube Channels for Dummies, 2nd Edition offers proven steps to attracting a chunk of those billions to your personal or business channel.  

This updated guide offers insight from a quartet of YouTube channel content creators, managers, marketers, and analysts as they share the secrets of creating great content, building an audience, and interacting with your viewers. The book includes information on: 

·         Setting up a channel 

·         Creating videos that attract viewers 

·         Putting together a video studio 

·         Editing your final product 

·         Reaching your target audience 

·         Interacting with your fans 

·         Building a profitable business 

·         Tips on copyright law 

Written for both the budding YouTube creator and the business professional seeking to boost their company’s profile on the popular social networking site, YouTube Channels for Dummies allows its readers to access the over two billion active YouTube users who log on each day. 

Learn how to create a channel, build a YouTube following, and get insight on content creation, planning, and marketing from established YouTube creators.  

Articles From YouTube Channels For Dummies

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YouTube Channels For Dummies Cheat Sheet

Cheat Sheet / Updated 02-25-2022

YouTube has definitely changed the entertainment playing field by globalizing the viewing experience. Any viewer who wants to see any video anywhere in the world only has to go to YouTube in their favorite browser, search for the video they want to see, and click the Play button — and there it is. As easy as it is for a viewer to take full advantage of YouTube, it’s almost as easy for a contributor to become part of the YouTube mix. After setting up an account, it’s a snap to start uploading video. And, if the video you’re uploading takes off, you could become famous and even earn a good chunk of change from your YouTube exploits.

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10 Things to Know About YouTube Copyright Rules

Article / Updated 01-25-2022

When someone infringes on copyright — whether it’s someone doing it to you or you doing it to someone else — there will be consequences. YouTube takes the breach seriously and will take down the infringing video. It also penalizes the offender with a strike. And as in baseball, if you get three strikes, you’re outta there! YouTube boots you and your channel if it gets to this point. To ensure that it doesn’t happen to you, follow this advice: Remember who owns the copyright It’s fairly simple: If you created the video, the copyright belongs to you; if you upload content created by someone else, the copyright belongs to that person, and you better get their permission before you upload it it. As soon as the work is created, so is the copyright, and since 1992, there’s no longer a renewal process. Copyright lives with the creator — and even lives on for a period after the death of the creator. Attribution does not absolve a copyright violation Some people steal other people’s work and claim it as their own, and that’s blatant infringement. But it’s no less of an offense when you use content and then add a line saying, “Created by so‐and‐so," or "No copyright infringement intended," or "All rights belong to their respective owners." It’s still a breach that can earn a strike and a block of the video. If you use someone else’s work in your video without that person’s permission, it doesn’t make it less of an offense just because you give the person credit. You’re still in violation because attributing the creator doesn’t absolve you if you don’t get permission. Know the consequences Two things can happen if you commit a copyright violation, and though they sound similar, they’re completely different: Takedown notice: If someone spots content they’ve created being used without their permission, they can send YouTube a complaint. If it’s a breach, YouTube takes down the video and issues the offender a copyright strike. If you feel compelled to lodge a complaint, just be extra sure that it’s your content and that the breach is accurate, because you’re initiating a legal process. Content ID match: Content ID is a system YouTube uses to automatically match content that violates copyright against the millions of videos uploaded every month to the site. For Content ID to work properly, copyright owners have to upload so‐called reference files — original versions of their work that prove they own the rights. Normally, record labels, movie studios, or TV stations go through this process for all the work they publish, so individual artists don’t have to worry about it. Every new video uploaded to YouTube is checked against this huge library of reference files, and if there is a match, YouTube automatically files a copyright claim for the owner of the work. No matter how a copyright violation may have been discovered, if you breach another content creator’s copyright, that creator is in a position to have YouTube take down your content. In the event of a mistake, you can send YouTube a notice saying that an error occurred, but you had better be darn sure about it. If the claim ends up being proven correct, or if you were untruthful in any way, you may find yourself in much bigger trouble, including legal action. The profit motive is irrelevant Some folks will say, “Hey, it’s all right if I use someone else’s content, because I’m not looking to make any money.” Say that before the judge and the verdict will still be “Guilty of copyright infringement!” Whether you intend to make money from the video or you simply want to share your masterpiece with the world, it still doesn’t mean that you can violate copyright law. You need to get permission from the copyright holder. Getting permission for using copyrighted material Getting permission to use someone else’s copyrighted material is often well within the realm of the possible. A nicely written note explaining how you would use the content usually is enough for a rights holder to grant permission. Just remember that it can get dicey, because sometimes permission comes with the caveat that you cannot monetize the overall video. That restriction can hurt big‐time if your intention is to quit your day job, but it may end up being a bittersweet solution if you’re merely looking to add flavor to your video. Fair use is complicated Albert Einstein never failed math, unicorns don’t exist, and fair use is anything but easy — or fair — to understand. Debunking the first two of these myths is easy. All right, maybe the first is, but when it comes to fair use, that’s a single‐horned horse of a different color. Many misconceptions exist surrounding fair use, among them the notion that you can use anything you want as long as you don’t go beyond some arbitrary time constraint. But it’s much more complicated. In some editorial situations, you can use copyrighted material without permission, but you must fully understand those situations to avoid future trouble. If you feel the need to exercise fair use, and the use is for nonprofit and educational purpose, here a few acceptable uses to consider: Criticism: Reviewing a movie or some form of music makes it perfectly acceptable to use copyrighted material without permission, for example short clips on the work you critique. Parody: If you’re poking fun at something, it’s acceptable to use content without first gaining permission. Commentary: This one depends on how you use the material. If it’s used just enough to illustrate your point, it’s acceptable. For instance, gamers on YouTube often record themselves playing a new video game and offer funny observations. This is, within limits, fair use. Academic: If you're creating educational content, it's considered fair to use to reference other works in certain situations. And now for the misconceptions: You can use 40 seconds of anything: It’s completely untrue. You can’t use even 4 seconds if it doesn’t comply with the circumstances in the preceding list. As a best practice, use the least amount of copyrighted material to get your point across, and always credit the original copyright owner. The notion that you can decide fair use for yourself: Fair use is complicated for many situations, so you may not be sure exactly what you’re allowed to do. The thing is, if you stretch the limits of fair use too far, and harm the original copyright owner's ability to profit from their work, you can be sanctioned by YouTube. That’s why a copyright attorney should decide any serious question over fair use. Don’t let copyright issues on YouTube lead to a strikeout Three strikes and you’re out is a common understanding when playing baseball. But in baseball, you get another chance after another eight batters have had their try. YouTube doesn’t share this benevolence, so if they give you three strikes — especially for copyright issues — that means a lifetime ban from its partnership program. That’s something you don’t want on your record; worse yet, once that happens to you, you won’t be able to recover any of your videos. So, you want to avoid getting strikes at all costs. There are two types of YouTube strikes: Community guideline strike: This type can result from a variety of causes, ranging from uploading objectionable content to having a misleading thumbnail or caption. You can learn more about these guidelines on YouTube's Community Guidelines page. Copyright strike: If some part of your video includes content from another creator and that creator did not grant you permission, you can get a copyright strike. You can appeal it or take down the video to avoid a possible strike. Other things you should know: Mandatory copyright school must be completed: After your first strike, YouTube requires that you take an online course and take a little quiz to be sure you’re up to speed on copyright regulations. Strikes come down, eventually: As long as you haven’t struck out, community guideline strikes and copyright strikes disappear after 90 days from the time they’re issued. At that point, YouTube restores any channel privileges you lost while you waited out the strike. If you draw three community guideline strikes or three copyright strikes over a 90-day period, your YouTube channel will be terminated. Your fate usually lies with the copyright holder: That person can decide whether the video you uploaded should be removed, flagged in certain regions, or even monetized. Yes, that’s right: Even though the video may contain only a small portion of the person’s material, they're entitled to all monetization proceeds. They can even put ads on your video, if you haven’t added monetization. Wipe the slate clean If you get a copyright strike from YouTube and you’re positive that you’re in the right, go ahead and appeal the strike with a copyright counter-notification. If you’re not sure whether you can win, maybe it’s better to wait it out until the strike expires. You see, after you appeal the strike, your personal information goes to the copyright holder and that person can possibly sue you for copyright infringement. If the situation gets to this level, you still can work out an agreement directly with the copyright holder and see whether they will file an appeal with YouTube on your behalf if you both agree that you were within your rights to use the copyrighted material. It’s worth a shot. YouTube’s robots are good at finding copyright infringements Whether intentional or inadvertent, sometimes the content of other creators gets used in a YouTube video. Sometimes the breach is noticed, and at other times it goes undetected by the original creator. But as YouTube continues to refine its copyright detection system, the system will find infringements more quickly than ever. Part of those refinements to YouTube’s copyright detection system include sophisticated algorithms that scan every uploaded video and compare it to similar uploaded content, looking for matches with music, video, or pictures. It seems music gets detected the most. Even if it’s background music, you may get sanctioned. Usually, YouTube blocks the video, and you must submit a dispute form. Copyright is not forever, but it’s forever enough for YouTube Copyright lasts for 70 years past the death of the author; after that point, the copyrighted content enters the public domain. When that happens, the content is no longer protected by intellectual property laws, and anyone can use it without permission. Of course, for many people on YouTube, that content isn’t available to use without permission until we near the next century. Of course, if the creator (or the creator's heirs) files a copyright extension, they can hold on to the rights — that way, the video of your dog dressed as a spider can stay in the family for as long as possible.

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Publishing and Unpublishing YouTube Videos

Article / Updated 01-25-2022

As a YouTube channel manager or content creator, your work may well be done when you’ve uploaded your videos and set the metadata. The last step when uploading a video is to publish it. Publishing is all about configuring the privacy settings that are most appropriate for your users and clicking Save during the upload process or by selecting a video on the YouTube Studio Video tab. For most channel managers, that means specifying one of the following: Private: Only you and people you choose can watch the video. You can manually send an invitation, or YouTube can send it to the email addresses you specify. Once you select Private, the Share Video Privately link appears. Click the link and enter the email addresses of your recipients. After you enter the addresses, click the "Notify via email" checkbox. When invitees get the invitation via email, they must log into their Google account to view the video. Unlisted: Anyone with the video link can watch the video. The difference between this setting and Private, is that anyone who has the link can share it with others. Public: The video will be available for anyone on YouTube that finds your video from the search engine, or stumbles upon it. When you choose this setting, you have the option to Set as instant Premiere, which means you and your viewers can watch it at the same time. Schedule: Choose this option and a dialog appears enabling you to set the date and time for when the video will be available on YouTube. When you schedule a video, you also have the option to set it as a Premiere. After choosing an option, you save, publish or schedule the video. If you choose the make the video Private or Unlisted, click the Save button. If you choose Public, click the Publish button. If you choose Schedule, click the Schedule button. Be sure to keep YouTube's copyright rules in mind, and follow them carefully. YouTube takes copyright infringement very seriously and there will be consequences if you violate the rules. After you publish videos, you have the option to unpublish them or delete tone or more videos To accomplish either task, log into YouTube, click your avatar and then choose Your Channel from the drop-down menu. Click Your Videos to display the Channel content page, which lists all your videos starting with the most recently published. To unpublish a video: Double-click the video thumbnail. The Video Details page appears. In the Visibility section, click the down-pointing arrow to the right of current visibility state. The Visibility options appear. To delete a video: Open the Channel content page as outlined previously. Click the Options icon. It’s the three dots to the right of the video thumbnail. Choose Delete Forever from the drop-down menu, as shown in the Figure below. YouTube displays a warning dialog that this action is undoable. Click the checkbox to acknowledge that deletion is permanent can cannot be undone. Before you delete a video from YouTube, you have the option to download it. Click Delete Forever. Poof. The video disappears in a cloud of virtual smoke. To delete multiple videos: Open the Channel content page as outlined previously. To select videos for deletion, click the check box to the left of any video you want to delete. You can select contiguous or non-contiguous videos. Click the More Actions link. A drop-down menu appears with the option to delete forever. If you choose one video, you also have the option to download the video. Choose Delete Forever. After choosing this option, YouTube displays a warning that you are about to delete (the dialog lists the number of videos you are about to delete) forever. Click the checkbox to acknowledge that deletion is permanent can cannot be undone. Your only other option is Cancel. Click Delete Forever. The videos are lost in cyberspace.

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How to Choose a YouTube Channel Name

Article / Updated 01-24-2022

Take a reflective pause before you choose a YouTube channel name, username, or other identifying criteria you want as your public face for the whole YouTube world. An overhasty decision here could end up being one that you regret later. Many a creator has made the mistake of beginning to upload videos to what they thought would remain a low‐key, personal channel, only to have that channel take off in popularity, at which point they begin to feel trapped in a channel named after their cat. (Okay, just to be clear, this wouldn’t be a problem if the channel is actually about your cat). The Google+ integration actually makes changing the channel name on the fly pretty easy and painless, even after the fact. The channel URL, however, is a different story. Advice for choosing a channel name Keep the following advice in mind when making your reflections: Don’t rush into anything. You should think hard about this decision. Though it seems like a light one, it really can impact the success of your channel in the long run if you choose a bad name. Try to relate the name to your content. Are you creating a channel about video games? Try to work a gaming term into your title. If you plan to create fitness‐related content, try to integrate workout or sports terms. Avoid profanity, vulgarity, and inside jokes. Though you may find it hilarious to name your channel Dadfarts, a name like that will necessarily limit your market. It’s hard to predict what path your videos might take on their way out into the world, and a sophomoric name (or a downright obscene one) might deter your viewers from sharing your video. Note: You want people to share your videos! Make the name catchy. Your channel name needs to be memorable. People love puns, rhyming, and alliteration, but don’t try to integrate all three. That might be a little much. Make it easy to spell. People need to be able to find your channel, and choosing a word that’s difficult to spell can prevent people from finding you. Do not see this as a felicitous opportunity to create a recondite channel name thronged with abstruse vocabulary that will confuse and confound your potential viewers. Make it easy for people to talk about. When you think you’ve hit on the perfect name, try reading it aloud a few times and make sure you can pronounce it. You want to have a channel name that people can talk about and make themselves understood. The best test for this is to call a friend on the phone and direct her to your channel. If you can tell your friend the channel name and she can get there without your having to spell it, you’ve got a usable name on your hands. Make sure the name is available and that you won’t be confused with another business on YouTube or elsewhere. You should search the web in general and YouTube specifically to make sure your brilliant channel name isn’t already in use elsewhere. You should also ensure that the URL you prefer is available. YouTube’s allocation of URLs is not automatic, and you choose your custom URL in a later step. So, even if your channel name is available, your custom URL may not be available. Check this in advance, or else it can turn into a real problem.

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How to Create a YouTube Channel

Step by Step / Updated 01-06-2022

You can do the work to establish your YouTube channel after you’ve logged in to YouTube with a Google account. After that’s done, follow these steps to get your channel off the ground:

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6 Tips for Creating a Great YouTube Channel

Article / Updated 01-06-2022

Whether you are creating your first YouTube channel or starting your fifth channel the process is the same. YouTube is simple right? Everybody who has a Gmail account already has a channel. If it does seem that simple to you, stick to these guidelines. Define what your channel focus will be. This is the very first step and the most important. This means choosing a topic or area of expertise to focus your channel content on. Use beautiful channel art that is illustrative of the type of content you’ll be focusing on. Create device agnostic art, meaning art that will look good on any kind of device. Take advantage of the YouTube templates so that the viewing experience is good on a mobile device, smart TV or desktop. Think about the viewer journey. You want to make content discoverability on your channel easy for new viewers. Carefully consider your target audience, then organize your content in such a way that extended viewing sessions are pleasurable for all viewers within that audience. Whether you are bringing viewers closer to your brand story or the niche topics that your channel covers, you want to make sure it is fun and easy to discover new content on your channel. Create playlists of similar videos. Think of a playlist as a daisy chain that will keep viewers on your channel. Create a strong content calendar. Be sure to tell your viewers when to expect what types of content from your channel. Utilize the channel trailer and the About channel section to inform viewers and subscribers of your content calendar. And stick to it. Create good content! This isn’t the first step on purpose; this comes after careful consideration of your channel focus, content strategy, and calendar. You’ll need to establish a cadence for content creation that is realistic for your personal goals or brand budget and timeline. Good video takes time. Create outlines and scripts for your videos; don’t make videos off the cuff when you start. Some creators can get away with unedited content, but you should create content that comes from a solid content and creative strategy. Create authentic content that aligns with your channel, your point of view, and your audience. Engage with your audience. Get to know them. Each video is like a date, they can stay after the first course and if they really like you they will comment on the video and share it with their friends. When that happens, be sure to comment back — reciprocity is the way to win on YouTube. Nurture your audience and your biggest fans; they will love you back, we promise. Nothing is easy in life, but lots of things are fun. Take advantage of the amazing ecosystem that YouTube provides, create, share and engage with your audience and you’ll be the real winner in the end. Good content, good friends and good times can be had on YouTube. Combine all those and you might even make good money.

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Determine Goals for Your YouTube Channel

Article / Updated 12-30-2021

Your YouTube channel showcases something you’re passionate about. What drives you to create a YouTube channel and content isn’t so different from what motivates you to do other things in life, such as Host a fundraiser Write a blog Support a cause Give something back to society Earn some income Learn a new hobby The reason that YouTube is such a great place for you to share your passion is because video is a supremely effective medium for getting your audience to engage with you. Learn to put that medium to use for you. Though building your channel is one major goal, you’ll likely have additional goals. Here are some other reasons for creating your YouTube channel and the content it contains: Build a brand. There’s no better way to show who you are, either as an independent creator or as an organization, than by way of a video or series of videos on your channel. The content might include different types of videos — something you’ve created, straight news, information about you, or a combination. Your motivation for brand building could be to obtain a new job, attract attention from industry luminaries, or make people feel good about your products. Educate your target audience. Most people love to learn, and much of the successful content on YouTube revolves around education and tutorials. Educational content includes home repair, product configuration, justification for social causes, and many more topics. Educational content also helps drive brand awareness. Entertain the crowd. People love to laugh, enjoy music, and get engrossed in a good story. These genres are all forms of entertainment, and all work especially well on YouTube. Many forms of entertainment are highly subjective, so be sure to tailor your content so that it connects with the specific audience you’re trying to reach. Sell something. It doesn’t matter whether you have a product to sell, a subscription to offer, or a candidate to elect, your YouTube channel is a great way to demonstrate to your audience that they want what you’re offering. People are turning to YouTube to make buying decisions about future purchases. Make sure you understand that YouTube is now a primary source of information used to influence a sale. According to Tubular Lab, 64 percent of consumers use YouTube to review electronics when making a purchase decision. Earn a living. We’ve explained that your videos can make money by driving and influencing sales. You can also earn a living from people watching your YouTube videos by monetizing your channel. Don’t quit your day job — at least not yet. Making money from YouTube takes time, creativity, and persistence. Even the best‐laid plans can’t guarantee results if you don’t (or your content doesn’t) resonate with your target audience. Don’t fret: Your YouTube channel may be a nice source of supplemental income, eventually. Don’t feel that you have to keep your goals separate. Donut Media’s popular automotive channel does a great job of combining educational goals with entertainment to keep its audience (almost 3 million subscribers) coming back for more.

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YouTube Channel Tabs

Article / Updated 12-30-2021

Just like a web browser, YouTube channels also have tabs. Tabs are helpful for viewers looking to navigate your channel quickly and efficiently. Each tab has a different functionality intended to help the viewing experience. The following tabs appear below your channel banner: Home: A viewer sees this tab by default when they click on your channel from a YouTube search or if they manually type in your channel address in their web browser. If you've created one, your Channel Trailer and Sections all appear here on the Home tab. Videos: The Videos tab contains exactly what you’d expect — all public videos on the channel. The default view is Newest Videos First — the videos that were added to the channel most recently. The viewer can always sort by Oldest Videos First or Most Popular as well. Playlists: The Playlist tab is where all your channel’s public playlists can be found. As a creator, you can fill up playlists with your own content. You can also curate content from other YouTube channels for your ­playlists. Playlists also come up in YouTube search results, so be sure to always use descriptive thumbnails for your videos, as well as compelling playlist descriptions. Playlists are a great way to extend your viewers’ session time on your channel. Session time directly supports your channel ranking and discoverability on YouTube search. Community: This feature, available only to channels with more than 1,000 subscribers, replaces the Discussion tab. If it's unlocked, you're able to use this tab to post images, videos, and polls. Channels: If you have partnerships, this tab is the place to add all ofthose channels that you associate with. If you are a brand that owns many channels, you’ll want to make sure all of your channels are listed here for easy discoverability and reference for the viewers. This is a quick way to get interested viewers to consume more related content. Discussion: Viewers are sure to comment on your channel and videos if you are creating engaging content. You can follow along with all the channel comments here on this tab. When logged in, you can remove inappropriate comments or report spam comments directly. About: This tab acts as your opportunity to tell your viewers all about yourself and/or your business. You can include an email address for viewers to contact you outside of YouTube. You can also include any relevant social network sites that you might be active on. Your viewers can come here to see some quick stats on your channel, such as your total view count, number of subscribers, and the date you created your YouTube channel.

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Manage Subscriptions for Your YouTube Channel

Article / Updated 12-30-2021

After you log into your YouTube account, the left sidebar contains a plethora of information. Click the Subscriptions link to see the most recent uploads for all of the channels you’ve subscribed to, from most recent to oldest. If your channel is new and you haven’t subscribed to anyone yet, this listing displays suggested genres and creators to get you started. Subscriptions are a good way to keep track of the channels you like on YouTube. On the Subscriptions page, you have the following tools for managing your subscriptions: Manage: Clicking this link takes you to a separate page listing all of your subscriptions. Here, you’re given the option to unsubscribe from any channels as well as alter their notification settings. (Notifications are denoted by the Bell icon in the top right of the screen.) You have the choice of All, Personalized, or None. All notifies you of any and all upload activity. Personalized notifies you of only certain uploads, based on a variety of variables, including your watch history. Finally, None turns off all notifications, if you really just don’t want to be bothered (or if you just like surprises). Arrangement: To the right of Manage are two icons. The leftmost icon, featuring a cluster of six boxes, reconfigures the page to display as a grid, showing only thumbnails, titles, and views. The icon to the right, with three squares and three lines, lists all uploads instead, allowing you to view the first part of the video description without having to click the actual video. Keeping an eye on more than video uploads might be a good idea in some cases, especially as you’re learning about building your audience. For example, seeing how often a channel you admire is commenting on videos and interacting with other creators can give you some insight into how successful creators behave on YouTube. You might learn something about how to interact with your own potential audience.

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What Makes a YouTube Channel Unique?

Article / Updated 12-30-2021

When you first create a YouTube channel, it’s nothing more than an empty template on a page. Over time, you add videos, make playlists, and create a header with graphics, logo, and other information. Obviously, your video content plays a big part in what make your channel special, but so does the channel’s look and feel. Everything from the layout and font color to the type of content and its subscribers helps set one channel apart from the others. Take a look at some basics: Have people find your channel. If a tree falls in the forest and nobody hears it fall, does it make a sound? Who knows? More appropriately, if you create a YouTube channel and nobody visits it, it’s a safe bet to say that all your good work has come to nothing. Viewers have to know that your channel exists before they can visit. The main way you have of letting people know you exist is by making sure your content shows up high in the search results of both Google and YouTube itself. (Don’t forget that YouTube is the second-most-popular search engine, just behind Google.) To get those high rankings, add search‐engine‐friendly keywords to the titles and descriptions of your videos — doing that will bring viewers searching for content in contact with your content, rather than someone else’s content. It’s also important that viewers watch, like, comment on, and share your video — yet more indications to the search engines that your content and channel are important. For good measure, use social media to prep your audience for content that’s coming down the pike — just like a movie studio creates a buzz for a big summer blockbuster by teasing you with previews and trailers weeks before release. Users often take advantage of the Browse Channels feature, shown in the figure below, which they can access by clicking the three-line menu icon in the upper-left corner of the home page and then scrolling down to "Browse channels." The more appealing your channel looks at first glance, the more likely a viewer will stop to spend some time exploring your offerings. Connect with your viewers. You definitely want to build a community of followers, and for that to happen, you need to actively communicate with them. That means everything from having them subscribe to your channel, engaging with them in your channel’s Comments section, and exposing them to your social media. You can do all this directly on your channel page. Provide them with a clear description of your channel. When viewers know what your channel has to offer, and if it appeals to their interests, they’re more likely to visit often, and maybe even subscribe to it. But you need to get the word out. You can also drive viewers to your YouTube channel from your social media posts. Angling for subscriptions Viewers who like your content will come back and watch more, but ­viewers who love your content will want to subscribe. Why not? When you keep reaching for the same magazine whenever you see it, eventually you just subscribe to it so it regularly comes to your door. YouTube offers repeat viewers of your channel the same option. Basically, all they have to do is click the Subscribe button on your channel’s home page. After viewers subscribe to your channel, you have to make it worth their while to view it, or they’ll unsubscribe faster than you can say Jack Nicholson. Here’s what “making it worth their while” entails: Stay in touch subscribers. According to YouTube, viewers subscribe to millions of channels every day, so it’s important to stay in touch if you want to stay uppermost in their minds. Suggest that viewers follow you on social media so that you can let them know when new content is available. This strategy helps your audience grow as you amass a devoted fan base. Actively upload videos. It’s difficult to imagine a television station maintaining viewers if it doesn’t add new programs. Even if it were all Seinfeld all the time, chances are good that viewers would even­tually drift off to something else. Well, the same concept applies for your YouTube channel. If you don’t upload new video content, you’ll lose the interest of your subscriber base. The takeaway here? Always ­provide new content. Pay close attention to tagging. Tagging is where you categorize your video after uploading it to YouTube. When a video is properly identified, it increases the possibility of someone else finding it, and that extends to future subscribers. Establishing your brand Whether it’s a consumer or a viewer, a brand makes your product or service immediately identifiable. Imagine that the Coca‐Cola logo looked different every time you saw it, or maybe the apple on your MacBook Air wasn’t the same apple you saw one embossed on your iPhone. This lack of consistency could shatter your confidence in the product; you may start wondering if what you had was a cheap knock‐off of the real thing, rather than the genuine article. Branding is designed to restore confidence in the product — that familiar logo makes us relax, knowing that we are sure to get the real thing. When it comes to your YouTube channel, branding becomes the identifiable element that lets viewers know who you are and what you’re all about, thus creating a similar feeling of confidence. Just like consumers flock to brands they identify with, your audience will do the same with your brand. Branding takes on many forms on YouTube: Intro clip: Before each video runs on your channel, you can insert an intro clip that acts as a label for your content. Keep your intro clip short ― no longer than 5 seconds. The torch-carrying lady wrapped in a flag for Columbia Pictures and the roaring MGM lion are good examples of a branding element. Your job, if you choose to accept it, is to come up with an intro of your own that is equally compelling. Channel header: This element is the banner on top of your main page, and at first it’s as empty as a blank page. You’ll ­definitely want to click that Add Channel Art button to add a compelling picture or another graphic along with the name of your channel. The channel header can also include your contact info, a link to your website, and specify how often you intend to upload new videos. Logo: Companies spend millions on branding when they have to come up with a new logo, because they have to track down and replace every single instance of the old logo. We're guessing that's not your problem ― you just have to come up with your own logo, perhaps using a simple image and your name. If you feel graphically challenged, you can find places on the web to create one inexpensively. Or just have an artistic friend design a logo for you. Playlists: If you have enough videos on your channel, you can create a running order of them. This playlist can provide an overview of your content or a specific sub‐topic of your videos. You can create multiple playlists and give each playlist a unique name so viewers know the content of each playlist. You can even rearrange the order of the videos on the playlist. If you're a frequent YouTube contributor, it's a good idea to create a playlist made up of your most recent videos. Trailer: In a YouTube context, a trailer is a video that can automatically play when visitors come to your channel. You can use the video most representative of your content as a kind of advertisement for your offerings, or you can make a short video that shows viewers what your channel is all about and how they can benefit from watching your videos.

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