Nikon D7500 For Dummies book cover

Nikon D7500 For Dummies

By: Julie Adair King Published: 10-23-2017

Your guide to capturing that perfect shot

The Nikon D7500 has created a buzz in the photography community, gaining recognition for its appealing combination of high-end features and compact size. If you’re upgrading your existing dSLR or even purchasing your very first camera, Nikon D7500 For Dummies will help you feel like a pro in no time.

This book highlights the importance of understanding all of the basic features of your new camera, before diving into insights about how to take top-notch photos. You’ll learn about when and how to use flash, understand exposure, and control focus and depth of field. There is also information on taking expert action, close-up, and landscape shots, and how to access and download those photo files. Photography is a great way to capture lifelong memories, and this book makes it easy to get started.   

  • Learn photography terminology
  • Shoot, view, and trim movies
  • Master color controls
  • Discover ways to customize your camera

Don’t just settle for auto mode; take advantage of all the D7500’s amazing features with the help of Nikon D7500 For Dummies!

Articles From Nikon D7500 For Dummies

page 1
page 2
page 3
28 results
28 results
Nikon D7500 For Dummies Cheat Sheet

Cheat Sheet / Updated 02-17-2022

For times when you don't have access to your copy of Nikon D7500 For Dummies, this Cheat Sheet offers a handy reference guide. It offers a map to the camera's exterior controls along with basic information about exposure modes and the functions played by each button, dial, and switch.

View Cheat Sheet
The Nikon D7500's Retouch Menu

Article / Updated 12-25-2017

Through the Retouch menu on your Nikon D7500, you can do simple photo editing in the camera. It's a no-risk proposition: The camera doesn't alter your original file; it makes a copy and applies changes to the copy only. Here are the basics you need to know to get started: Accessing retouching tools: You can take two routes: Retouch menu: Display the Retouch menu, shown on the left. (More tools await on the menu's second and third pages.) Select a tool and press OK to display image thumbnails, as shown on the right in the figure. Select the image you want to edit by tapping it or by using the Multi Selector to move the yellow box over it. Then tap the OK symbol or press the OK button to display options related to the chosen retouching tool. Playback i-button menu: In Playback mode, select the photo you want to alter, press the i button, and choose Retouch to display the Retouch menu over your photo. Select a tool and press OK to access the tool settings.You can't use the i-button menu to access one tool, Image Overlay. Determining which files can be edited: If the camera can't apply the selected tool, it displays an X over the thumbnail, as shown on the right, or dims or hides the tool on the Retouch menu. A file or tool may be off-limits for these reasons: The tool isn't relevant to the current file. For example, the Straighten tool I selected doesn't work on movie files, so the X appears over the movie file in the figure. (Movie files are indicated by a dotted border.) In fact, the only Retouch menu option available for movies is Edit Movie. And if you took a portrait without using flash, the Red-Eye Reduction tool isn't available — the camera is smart enough to know that you won't need it. You previously applied a tool that prevents further editing. You can apply multiple tools to the same original, but you need to be careful in what order you use them because some tools produce a file that can't be altered. After you use the Trim tool to crop your image, for example, you can't do anything else to the cropped version. A Retouch symbol, shown on the right, indicates an edited file. Adjusting tool settings: After you select certain tools, you see a preview of your image along with options that enable you to adjust the tool effect. Get a bigger preview: If the Zoom symbol appears at the bottom of a screen, press the Zoom In button or tap the Zoom symbol to magnify the image. Release the button or tap the exit arrow in the top-right corner of the screen to exit the magnified view. Saving the edited copy: Tap the OK Save symbol at the bottom of an editing screen or press the OK button to finalize edits and save the edited copy. The file is saved in the JPEG format, using the same Image Quality setting as the original. If you began with a Raw image, the JPEG version is saved using the Fine setting. (Again, Image Overlay is the exception: It combines two Raw files to create a new Raw file.) The retouched image is assigned the next available file number. Make note of the number so that you can find the image later. Compare the original and retouched image: Put the camera in playback mode and display the original or retouched image. Then press the i button, choose Retouch, and select Side-by-Side Comparison, as shown. (You can't get to this feature via the standard Retouch menu; you must use the Playback mode version of the i-button menu.) A screen similar to the one shown here appears, with your original on the left and the edited version on the right. A text label indicates the tool used to create the edited version. The yellow box indicates the selected image. Select the other image by using the Multi Selector. You can then tap Zoom or press the Zoom In button to study the selected image at a larger size. Release the button or tap the exit arrow to return to the side-by-side view. When the retouched version is selected, you can also use these tricks: If you applied more than one tool to the picture, press the Multi Selector right and left to display thumbnails that show how each tool affected the image. If you created multiple edited copies of the photo, press the Multi Selector up and down to scroll through them. To return to normal playback, select the image you want to display (the original or the altered version). Then press the Playback button.

View Article
Highlights Display Mode on the Nikon D7500

Article / Updated 12-17-2017

One of the most difficult photo problems to correct in a photo-editing program is known as blown highlights in some circles and clipped highlights in others. Both terms mean that the brightest areas of the image are so overexposed that areas that should include a variety of light shades are instead totally white. In Highlights display mode on your Nikon D7500 camera, areas that the camera thinks may be overexposed blink in the camera monitor. To use this mode, you must first enable it via the Display Options setting on the Playback menu. To fully understand all the features of Highlights mode, you need to know a little about digital imaging science. First, digital images are called RGB images because they're created from the three primary colors of light: red, green, and blue. In Highlights mode, you can display the exposure warning for all three color components — sometimes called color channels — combined or view the data for each individual channel. When you look at the brightness data for a single channel, though, greatly overexposed areas don't translate to white in photos — rather, they result in a solid blob of some other color. I don't have space in this book to provide a full lesson in RGB color theory, but the short story is that when you mix red, green, and blue light, and each component is at maximum brightness, you get white. Zero brightness in all three channels gives you black. If you have maximum red and no blue or green, you have fully saturated red. If you mix two channels at maximum brightness, you also get full saturation. For example, maximum red and blue produce fully saturated magenta. And this is why it matters: Wherever colors are fully saturated, you can lose picture detail. For example, a rose petal that should have a range of tones from light to dark red may instead be bright red throughout. The moral of the story is that when you view your photo in single-channel display, large areas of blinking highlights in one or two channels indicate that you may be losing color details. Blinking highlights that appear in the same spot in all three channels indicate blown highlights — again, because when you have maximum red, green, and blue, you get white. Either way, you may want to adjust your exposure settings and try again. Okay, with today's science lesson out of the way, the figure displays an image that contains some blown highlights to show you how things look in Highlights display mode. The screen is captured at the moment the highlight blinkies blinked "off" — the black areas in the figure indicate the blown highlights. But as this image proves, just because you see the flashing alerts doesn't mean that you should adjust exposure — the decision depends on where the alerts occur and how the rest of the image is exposed. In my candle photo, there are indeed small white areas in the flames and the glass vase, yet exposure in the majority of the image is fine. If you reduce exposure to darken the brightest spots, some areas of the flowers would be underexposed. In other words, sometimes you simply can't avoid a few clipped highlights when the scene includes a broad range of brightness values. In the lower-left corner of the display, the letters highlighted in yellow tell you whether you're looking at a single channel (R, G, or B) or the three-channel, composite display (RGB). The latter is selected in the figure. To cycle between the settings, tap the Select R, G, B symbol in the lower-right corner of the screen or press the Zoom Out button as you press the Multi Selector right or left.

View Article
Magnifying Photos During Playback on the Nikon D7500 Camera

Article / Updated 12-17-2017

On your Nikon D7500 camera, you can magnify a photo that you have displayed in single-frame view. Single-frame view is shown on the left in the following figure; the magnified image is shown on the right. Here's how: Magnify the image. Pinch out on the touchscreen or press the Zoom In button. The bar at the bottom of the navigation window gives you an indication of the magnification level; the bar turns green when you reach 100 percent magnification. Reduce magnification. Pinch in or press the Zoom Out button. View another part of the magnified picture. When an image is magnified, a thumbnail showing the entire image appears briefly in the lower-right corner of the monitor (refer to the right side). The yellow outline in the thumbnail indicates the area that's consuming the rest of the monitor space. To scroll the display and view a different portion of the image, use the Multi Selector or just drag your finger across the screen. After a few seconds, the navigation thumbnail disappears; tap the screen or press the Multi Selector in any direction to redisplay it. • Inspect faces. When you magnify portraits, the picture-in-picture thumbnail displays a white border around each face. Rotate the Sub-command dial or tap a face in the thumbnail to scroll the display to show another face. Unfortunately, the camera sometimes fails to detect faces, especially if the subject isn't looking directly at the camera. When it works correctly, though, this is a pretty great tool for checking for closed eyes, red-eye, and, of course, spinach in the teeth. View more images at the same magnification. While the display is zoomed, tap the scroll arrows at the bottom of the screen (labeled on the right) or rotate the Main command dial to display the same area of the next photo at the same magnification. Crop the photo to the currently displayed area. This feature creates a new image that contains just the area visible in the magnified view. To try it out, press the i button and then choose Quick Crop from the i-button menu, as shown on the left. The camera creates your cropped copy, assigns it the next available filename, and displays it on the monitor, as shown on the right in the figure. The Retouch symbol, labeled in the figure, appears to remind you that you're not looking at an original image. The lower-right corner of the display also shows a scissors symbol, indicating that the photo was cropped. The resolution of the cropped copy appears as well. Although handy, this feature limits you to cropping to the photo's original aspect ratio. For other options, check out the Trim function on the Retouch menu. Return to full-frame view. You don't need to keep pressing the Zoom Out button or pinching in until the entire photo is displayed. Instead, just press OK.

View Article
Displaying Photos in Calendar View on the Nikon D7500

Article / Updated 12-17-2017

Calendar display mode on the Nikon D7500, shown in the figure, makes it easy to locate pictures according to the date you shot them. Try it out: Press the Zoom Out button or pinch in on the touchscreen as needed to bring up the calendar display. If you're currently viewing images in full-frame view, for example, you need to press the button or pinch in four times to cycle through the thumbnail displays and then to Calendar view. Select the date on which you shot the images you want to see. A yellow box highlights the currently selected date. To select a different date, tap it in the calendar or move the highlight box over it by using the Multi Selector. After you select a date, the right side of the screen displays thumbnails of pictures taken on that date. The number of the month appears at the top of the screen. If the memory card contains more than one month's worth of pictures, left and right scroll arrows appear at the top of the display (not shown). You can tap those arrows or use the Multi Selector to display a different month. To access the images on the selected date, press the Zoom Out button. Alternatively, you can tap the symbol at the bottom of the screen, highlighted on the left. The thumbnail strip becomes active (refer to the right side), and you can scroll through the thumbnails by using the touchscreen or Multi Selector. The currently selected image is highlighted by a yellow box. To temporarily display a larger view of the selected thumbnail, as shown, hold down the Zoom In button. Release the button to exit the zoomed preview. To jump from the thumbnail strip back to the calendar so you can select a different date, press the Zoom Out button again. To exit calendar view and display a photo in single-image view, select the photo in the thumbnail strip and then tap the thumbnail or press OK. Press OK again to switch back to Calendar view.

View Article
Shifting to Thumbnail Display on the Nikon D7500 Camera

Article / Updated 12-17-2017

Instead of displaying each photo or movie one at a time on your Nikon D7500 camera, you can display 4 or 9 thumbnails, as shown in the following figure, or even a whopping 72 thumbnails. Here's how Thumbnail display works: Display thumbnails. If the touchscreen is enabled, pinch in. Again, that means to put your thumb and a finger on opposite corners of the monitor and drag both toward the center of the screen. You also can press the Zoom Out button. Either way, your first pinch in or press of the Zoom Out button cycles from single-picture view to 4-thumbnail view. Keep pinching or pressing to shift to 9-picture view and then to 72-thumbnail view. One more pinch or button press takes you to Calendar view. Display fewer thumbnails. For touchscreen operation, pinch out: Place your thumb and forefinger in the center of the screen and drag both toward the edge of the monitor. If you prefer, press the Zoom In button instead. Each pinch or press shifts you one step closer to full-frame view. Scroll to the next screen of thumbnails. Drag your finger up or down the screen or press the Multi Selector up and down. Select an image. To perform certain playback functions while in Thumbnail view, you first need to select an image. A yellow box surrounds the selected image. To select a different image, just tap its thumbnail or use the Multi Selector to move the highlight box over the image. Toggle between thumbnails display and full-frame view. To quickly shift from any thumbnails view to singe-image view, select the image you want to inspect. Then press OK or tap the selected thumbnail. If a photo is displayed in single-image view, you can return to the previous thumbnails display by pressing the OK button. (There's no touchscreen equivalent for this operation.) If a movie is displayed, pressing OK begins movie playback. So instead, press the Zoom Out button to go back to Thumbnail view. The four- and nine-thumbnail displays include the name of the folder that holds the images as well as the frame number of each file. In the figure, for example, the folder name is 100D7500 and the selected frame number is 0007. The frame number isn't the same thing as the filename; it just tells you which file you're viewing in a series of files. In 72-thumbnail view, the folder number and frame number of the currently selected image both appear at the bottom of the screen.

View Article
Disabling Automatic Picture Rotation on the Nikon D7500

Article / Updated 12-17-2017

By default, picture files include information about camera orientation — that is, whether you held the Nikon D7500 camera in the normal, horizontal position when taking the picture or rotated it to vertical. During playback, the camera reads the orientation data and rotates vertically oriented images so that they appear in the upright position, as shown on the left. The picture is also automatically rotated when you view it in any photo programs that can read the data. You can customize the rotation features via the following Playback menu options, both shown in the following figure: Auto Image Rotation: This option tells the camera whether to include orientation data in the picture file. I'm not sure why you wouldn't want that information in the file, but if you have a reason, set this option to Off. Vertically oriented pictures then appear horizontally on the camera monitor, as shown on the right, and you have to rotate them manually to their correct orientation in your photo software. Rotate Tall: Change this setting to Off if you want vertically oriented pictures displayed horizontally during playback, regardless of whether they include orientation data. If Auto Image Rotation is turned on — again, that means that the orientation is noted in the picture file — photos are still rotated when you view them in photo programs that can read the orientation data. Regardless of the settings you choose, no rotation occurs during the Image Review period or when you're viewing a movie. Also be aware that shooting with the lens pointing directly up or down sometimes confuses the camera, causing it to record the wrong orientation data.

View Article
Adjusting Playback Timing on Your Nikon D7500

Article / Updated 12-17-2017

You can specify how long the camera displays each photo and whether you want to use the Image Review feature, which automatically displays an image for a few seconds after the camera records it to the memory card. Here are the details: Adjust playback display time: By default, the monitor turns off after 10 seconds of inactivity when the camera is in Playback mode. To adjust the shutoff timing, open the Custom Setting menu, choose Timers/AE Lock, and then choose Monitor Off Delay, as shown on the left in the figure. The second screen in the figure appears. Select Playback to choose your desired shutoff time, keeping in mind that the longer the monitor remains on, the more battery juice the camera consumes. Turn on and customize Image Review. Open the Playback menu to turn on the Image Review feature, as shown in the following figure. By default, the camera displays the photo for 4 seconds. You can change the length of that display time through the same Custom Setting menu option that controls regular playback shutoff. Just choose Image Review instead of Playback from the right screen shown in the preceding figure.

View Article
Choosing Which Images to View on Your Nikon D7500 Camera

Article / Updated 12-17-2017

Your Nikon D7500 camera organizes pictures automatically into folders that are assigned generic names: 100D7500, 101D7500, and so on. You can also create custom folders. If your card contains multiple folders, tell the camera which folder or folders you want to view via the Playback Folder option on the Playback menu, shown on the left in the figure. You have the following options: D7500: Displays all pictures taken with the D7500, regardless of which folder they call home. All: Displays all pictures taken with the D7500 as well as any shot with another camera. The only requirement is that the files be in an image format the camera recognizes. (You can usually view JPEG files and Nikon Raw files, but not Raw files from another brand of camera.) This setting is the default. Current: Displays images in the folder that the camera is currently using to store new images. To see the name of that folder, open the Photo Shooting menu and choose Storage Folder. For a faster way to select a single folder, press the i button to display the Playback version of the i-button menu, shown on the right. Select Choose Folder to display a list of available folders. Tap the one you want to view or highlight it and press the OK button.

View Article
Picture Playback 101 on the Nikon D7500

Article / Updated 12-17-2017

Seeing your pictures is just the start of the things you can do when you switch your Nikon D7500 camera to playback mode. The following steps provide a quick introduction to viewing your photos. Press the Playback button to put the camera in playback mode. The figure shows you where to find the button. By default, you see a single photo along with some picture information, as shown in the figure. If you instead see multiple thumbnails, press the OK button to switch to single-photo view. If you see a calendar display, press OK twice. (Upcoming sections explain how to use these alternative displays.) Movie files have a movie-camera icon in the upper-left camera. To scroll through your picture and movie files, flick a finger across the touchscreen or press the Multi Selector right or left. The Multi Selector is labeled in the figure. To view the next picture using the touchscreen, flick from right to left across the screen. Flick from the left to go back one picture. A few quick tips on scrolling in single-picture view: Want to flick left to go forward and right to go back? Open the Setup menu, choose Touch Controls, and set the Full-frame Playback Flicks option to the one that bears the left-pointing arrow. (Both options are named Left/Right; the difference is the direction of that arrow.) If you put a finger on the bottom of the display, a gray frame-advance bar appears. Drag right or left on the bar to scroll quickly forward or backwards through your images. Lift your finger to hide the bar and return to the normal playback screen. You can magnify the image by pressing the Zoom In button. If the touchscreen is enabled, you also can pinch outward to magnify the photo, just as you do on a smartphone or tablet. Use the Multi Selector or drag your finger across the screen to scroll the display so that you can view a different area of the picture. To reduce the magnification, press the Zoom Out button or pinch inward on the touchscreen. The upcoming section "Magnifying Photos During Playback" talks more about the magnification feature. Note that the feature doesn't work for movies. To return to picture-taking mode, press the Playback button again or press the shutter button halfway and then release it.

View Article
page 1
page 2
page 3