How to Choose a Writer for Your Business Blog

By Amy Lupold Bair, Susannah Gardner

Businesses have developed two approaches to company blogs: blogs written by one person and those written by multiple people from all over the organization. Either approach is valid, as long as everyone posting to the blog has a clear idea of the goals, ideas, and style of the blog.

If you create a blog that has multiple contributors, put a single individual in charge of content on a regular basis and encourage others from the organization to chime in when they have something to say. The responsibility for the blog is in one person’s hands, but the door is open for wide participation.

Occasional writers are welcome, but don’t suddenly give employees brand-new job duties that they can’t meet. Having multiple voices in a blog can also help you to convey the culture of your company overall, giving readers a taste of what people at all levels of the organization think about and do.

If you spread the writing around, you might be able to create a blog that has a huge amount of content and satisfies a very large readership. The multiple-voice perspective might also awaken ideas in the other writers and generate internal conversations.

No matter who blogs, you must decide internally whether someone needs to vet posts before actually posting them, and who should do the vetting. It’s a good idea to have someone who isn’t blogging keep an eye on things, just to get a second opinion.

When you’re considering just who should blog on behalf of the company, give some thought to

  • Writing ability: You need a blogger who’s an effective writer and who also likes to write. Some companies choose to hire a blogger from outside the company who has experience and the ability to communicate effectively about topics related to that company.

  • Position within the company: Who’s the right person to reach out to the public? CEOs offer one perspective, as do those on the factory floor. Try to match the goals and style of your blog with the right people within your company, and don’t be afraid to give unexpected staffers a try.

  • Knowledge and expertise: Be sure to choose a person who has sufficient knowledge and expertise to be interesting and engaging on the subjects the blog discusses. Preferably, you want people who really know what they’re talking about and have information to share.

  • Time commitments: Choose a blogger who has the time to put into the site. Don’t overload already busy staff with this new job requirement.

After you choose a blogger, you have a few more folks to identify. Don’t forget to plan whom you want to review comments, deal with spam, and fix technical issues.