LinkedIn For Dummies book cover

LinkedIn For Dummies

By: Joel Elad Published: 04-20-2021

Brand yourself like a pro on LinkedIn 

LinkedIn multiplies what you know by the power of who you know to deliver the number one social platform for business professionals and new job seekers. LinkedIn For Dummies shows LinkedIn newcomers the best ways to discover new opportunities, enhance their personal brand, network with other professionals, and give an exponential boost to their career. Consider this book a passport to help you connect more successfully with many of LinkedIn’s 660+ million members in over 200 countries, as well as an expert guide to the platform’s tools and features and the proven tactics that get you noticed.  

In this friendly, all-access introduction to the LinkedIn scene, entrepreneurship guru Joel Elad clues you in on the essentials. Get the latest insight on how to create an attractive profile that will make employers give you a second glance as well as techniques for making useful connections across the globe. In no time at all you’ll also be right at home with the profile user interface and getting busy with adding content, searching for career opportunities, and, if you’re looking to hire for your company, recruiting top candidates.  

  • Build your personal brand and market it 
  • Sell yourself by highlighting skills, awards, and endorsements 
  • Get connected with LinkedIn groups 
  • Manage and make introductions via InMail 

Relationships matter: LinkedIn For Dummies gives you the online social skills to turn six degrees of separation into the colleagues, mentors, and friends who will transform your career—and your life.  

Articles From LinkedIn For Dummies

page 1
page 2
page 3
26 results
26 results
LinkedIn For Dummies Cheat Sheet

Cheat Sheet / Updated 03-20-2021

Signing on to LinkedIn means you’re part of the largest online professional network in the world. Look here for helpful guidelines for using LinkedIn, especially when job searching. LinkedIn helps you create and maintain an online profile you can then use to build a professional network.

View Cheat Sheet
How to Use LinkedIn Archives for Data Syncing

Article / Updated 06-21-2018

There is a wealth of information contained in your LinkedIn account — from your list of connections to your experience, education, skills, and other profile information, to your status updates, long-form publisher posts, and publications posted through LinkedIn. As time goes on, the information from this account may contain more up to date info than your email or contact information systems. Especially if you’re in a sales position, contacts and daily information are crucial to your ongoing survival. Today, there’s an easy way to capture that data and use it for other programs to help you manage your life. LinkedIn archives + data syncing = ready-to-build Rolodex LinkedIn allows you to request an archive of your data, which means you can download files that contain all your account activity from the moment you joined LinkedIn to today. This activity includes all connections and contacts, as well as your profile data, messages sent and received, and recommendations written and given. This data is downloaded as comma separated value (CSV) files, which can be easily imported to a data-syncing platform such as Evernote, so your data can be available across all your devices. To benefit from LinkedIn archives and data syncing, follow these steps: Log in to your LinkedIn account. Click the Me icon (your profile picture) from the top navigation bar, and then click Settings & Privacy from the drop-down list that appears. The Settings & Privacy page appears. Click the Account header, if it’s not already selected, and scroll down until you can see the Download Your Data header. To expand the options for Download Your Data, click its Change link. You can click next to The Works, which downloads everything, or you can click next to Pick and Choose and then select the check boxes corresponding to the data you want to download. Click the Request Archive button to start the LinkedIn data download process.The data archive comes in two pieces. A short time after you click the button, you get a file with the easier-to-collect parts of your data archive, such as messages, connections, and any contacts you imported to LinkedIn. Within 24 hours, on average, you get an email with instructions on how to download a second file containing the rest of your LinkedIn data. After all the data is downloaded to your computer, use your favorite information storage program, such as Evernote, to upload this archive and keep track of your LinkedIn connections and activity.

View Article
Understanding the 2 Types of LinkedIn Groups

Article / Updated 06-21-2018

Over the years, LinkedIn groups have evolved to provide a quality place for interactions and content while fighting attempts to flood groups with spam or promotional content. Therefore, LinkedIn groups are now private, members-only groups, which means that you can’t join a group without approval or an invitation, and the conversations in a group are not visible to the outside world (including search engines). In this way, only members of the group can see and contribute to conversations. Following are the two types of LinkedIn groups: Standard: These groups are the most common form of LinkedIn groups. They show up in search results and allow any current member of the group to invite and approve their first-degree connections to join the group. Membership in this group is displayed on each member’s profile page under the Interests header; and to see all of a person’s groups, you click See All below the Interests header. The group’s summary page appears in search engine results, but the conversations in the group do not. Unlisted: These groups are invitation-only groups; the only way you can join is to be invited by the group owner or manager. These groups do not appear in a LinkedIn search or any search engine, and non-group members can’t see the group logo in a member’s profile page. Examples of unlisted groups include employee-only groups for a company, customer-only groups to handle customer service or new product ideas, and focus groups to share and collaborate on new ideas or discuss potential upcoming products for a company.

View Article
How to Prepare Your LinkedIn Profile and Account Settings for Job Searches

Article / Updated 06-21-2018

Part of the success of finding a job is to have an appealing LinkedIn identity so hiring managers can find you and want to contact you with an opening. According to Forbes magazine, 90 percent of employers are using social media sites to recruit employees, with LinkedIn the most used of those sites. After all, the best search is when someone comes to you with an opportunity without you sweating the details. Check your LinkedIn profile’s visibility If you’re currently employed but decide to quietly start looking for a new position, consider what you’re broadcasting to your LinkedIn network before getting ready to make a change. You don’t want your current employer or co-workers to see a flurry of activity that’s typically a sign of moving on to greener pastures! To check your visibility settings, click the Me icon, at the top of any LinkedIn page, and then click Settings & Privacy under the Account header. On your Settings page, click the Privacy header, and pay careful attention to the following three options: Profile Privacy: Sharing Profile Edits: Click the Change link for this option, and make sure the slider is set to No for the Choose Whether Your Network Is Notified about Profile Changes option. That way, your boss or co-workers won’t see a flurry of activity if you update your profile or follow companies, one of which could become your new employer. Profile Privacy: Who Can See Your Connections: Again, typically, this option is set to Your Connections so your first-degree connections can see your other connections. However, you can change this option to Only You so your boss or co-workers can’t see when, for example, you add a bunch of recruiters or competitors to your network. Blocking and Hiding: Followers: Typically, this option is set to Your Connections so your first-degree connections can see all your public activity on LinkedIn. If you change this option to Everyone, people outside your network, such as recruiters and potential hiring managers, can get an idea of the information you regularly share on LinkedIn. Optimize your LinkedIn profile The core of your LinkedIn presence is your profile, which is included with every job application you make on LinkedIn. Odds are good that prospective employers are going to check your LinkedIn profile when evaluating you for a job, so you want to make sure your profile is optimized to make you as appealing as possible. Now that you’ve checked your settings, here are some things to keep in mind when bulking up your profile for a job search: Complete all the sections in your profile with as much accurate information as possible. It’s easy to put up a skeleton of your employment history and never get around to fully completing your profile. Unlike a resume (where you could feel confined in terms of page length), you can be as expansive as you want with your LinkedIn profile. You never know what part of your profile will get you included in someone’s search result, but the more information you provide, the better the chances that someone will find you. Make sure your most recent positions are filled out, because many employers focus on those positions first. Focus on accomplishments rather than duties. Lots of people prepare their LinkedIn profiles in the same way they do their resumes, focusing solely on the duties they performed at each job. Although you want to give people an idea of what you did, hiring managers want to know the results of what you did, and the more concrete the example, the better. Saying you “organized procurement processes in your division” may demonstrate a skill, but saying that you “cut procurement costs by 16 percent in your first year” has a bigger effect. Go back and talk to past co-workers or bosses, if necessary, to get whatever specifics they can provide on your performance. Add all relevant job search keywords, skill sets, and buzzwords to your profile. When prospective employers are searching for someone to hire, they may simply search for a core set of skills to see who can fill the position. Therefore, just stating your job titles is not enough. If your profile says “Software Developer,” prospective hiring managers could assume that you’re qualified, but the only way you’d be considered is if these managers ran a search on those keywords. Say that a hiring manager does a search for the programming languages C++, Java, Perl, and Python. If all those keywords are not somewhere in your profile, you won’t show up in the list. If you’re unsure about what keywords to use, ask people in your field or research the profiles of people who have the job title you are seeking. Use an appropriate and professional profile photo. It has been said before but is worth repeating: LinkedIn is designed so you can network like a professional, and your profile photo is an important part of that process. Ditch the party photo best suited for Facebook. LinkedIn provides tips for choosing a profile picture on its talent blog. Use a photo of yourself rather than the generic icon supplied by LinkedIn. According to research done by LinkedIn Talent Solutions, profiles with a profile photo are 14 times more likely to be viewed by other members. See how other people position themselves. Imagine if you could get a book of thousands of resumes from current employees and use them as models to position yourself. Do a search for people with a job, education, or skill set similar to yours and see how they’ve worded their profiles or how they put their experiences in context. Use that insight to adapt your profile to make it clearer to others. List all your job experiences in your profile, not just full-time positions. Did you do any short-term or contract jobs? Were you an advisor to another company? Perhaps you’re a board member for a local nonprofit group or religious organization. Your LinkedIn profile is designed to reflect all your job experiences, which is not limited to a full-time job that provided a W-2 slip. Document any work experience that adds to your overall profile, whether or not you were paid for that job or experience. LinkedIn has sections in which you can highlight volunteer and nonprofit experience. Make sure that every experience you list in your profile contributes to your overall career goals. After all, employers might not care that you were a pastry chef one summer — and will question why you thought it was so important that you listed it in your profile.

View Article
How to Screen Job Candidates with LinkedIn

Article / Updated 06-21-2018

After you use LinkedIn to post a job request, you can continue to use LinkedIn to assist you in the screening part of your hiring process. In addition to asking for references from the applicant or possibly ordering a background check from an independent background check agency, you can use LinkedIn to verify information in your applicant’s resume and application at any stage of the process, without paying a dime! Here are some strategies to keep in mind for screening job candidates with LinkedIn: Start by thoroughly reviewing the applicant’s profile. When you review an applicant’s profile, compare it with her resume, cover letter, and application. Is she consistent in how she presents her experience? Read through the applicant’s recommendations and follow up. If your candidate has received recommendations, go through them, noting the date the recommendation was written, and see whether any are applicable toward your open position. Pay particular attention to recommendations from former bosses or co-workers. If necessary, ask your candidate whether you can contact the recommender through InMail and use that person as a reference. See whether you’re connected to your candidate. When you pull up your candidate’s profile, you see whether she is a second- or third-degree network member, which would mean one or two people connect you with the candidate. If so, contact that person (or ask for an introduction to reach the correct party) and ask for more information about the candidate. Chances are good that you’ll get a more honest assessment from someone you know rather than the recommendations provided by the candidate. Understand, however, that although the two people may be connected, they may not know each other that well, or their connection may be outside the professional expertise you’re looking to learn about from this job candidate. Evaluate the candidate’s total picture. If your candidate mentions any websites, blogs, or other online presence in her profile, look at the listed interests and group affiliations and see whether they add to (or detract from) your picture of the job candidate. Because most LinkedIn users have already defined each position they’ve held, the companies where they’ve worked, and the years of employment, you can get a sense of their abilities, what they’ve handled in the past, and depending on the completeness of their profile, examples of their past accomplishments. As helpful as LinkedIn can be when reviewing a candidate, don’t be afraid to use other Internet websites and searches to gain a well-rounded view of the candidate in question.

View Article
How to Create a LinkedIn Public Profile Badge for Other Websites

Article / Updated 06-21-2018

LinkedIn allows you to create public profile badges. Many people have more than one website that communicates what they do, both professionally and personally, on the Internet, such as a variety of social media accounts, a website, a blog, or a company website. Why should you repeat yourself, in terms of your professional identity, across all these sites, when you can simply provide a link back to your LinkedIn profile from any other web page! LinkedIn’s public profile badge creates an icon that you can add to other online sites to provide easy, clickable access to your profile. Creating this badge is easy. To create a public profile badge, follow these steps: Click the Me icon from the top navigation bar, and then click on View Profile from the drop-down list that displays. Your profile page appears. Click the Edit Public Profile & URL button, along the top right of the screen. The Edit My Public Profile window appears. Scroll down to the bottom, and click the Create a Public Profile Badge link. The Public Profile Badge Builder page appears. For Step 1: Click the Copy the Code button. This copies the line of code starting with </code> and ending with <code>. Go to the website where you want to add your LinkedIn badge, and paste this line of code in the header part of the HTML file. (Paste the line of code between the and commands in your HTML file.) This line of code basically allows the other web page to load instructions and information from LinkedIn to display the badge. You have to copy this line of code only once to the new page. For Step 2: Scroll down so you can see examples of each badge type. Choose a format and color scheme, and then click the Copy the Code button below that design. LinkedIn offers badges that fit inside the main part of a website and in the sidebar of a page (scroll down the page to see them). You can change the width of the badge by selecting another option from the Size list. Go back to your website files, and paste the code that you just copied into the precise spot in your HTML or web page file where you want the badge to display on the web page. Save your file with the new code. Your web page file is simply a list of instructions that build a web page, from top to bottom. Therefore, choose the spot on the website where you want to insert your LinkedIn badge, and find that corresponding spot in the web page file. That’s where you should paste the LinkedIn code. Upload the revised web page file, and use your web browser to make sure the badge is displayed properly on the website page.

View Article
How to Export Your LinkedIn Profile to a PDF File

Article / Updated 06-21-2018

Sometimes, you might have to send a file that documents your experience instead of pointing people to your LinkedIn account. Suppose that your resume or CV is out of date, but your LinkedIn account is current. The easiest solution is to quickly take a snapshot of your LinkedIn profile and save it in a file that can be easily shared. PDF (Portable Document Format) is one of the most popular file formats for distributing information that is locked. To export your LinkedIn profile to a PDF file, follow these steps: Click the Me icon, and then click View Profile from the drop-down list that appears. On your profile page, click the three dots to the right of your profile photo. The drop-down list appears. Click Save to PDF. LinkedIn prepare your PDF file and then issues a prompt for you to save the PDF file on your computer or open the program on your computer using a program. Click OK. The PDF file is saved to your computer. In Step 3, if you chose instead to open the PDF file on your computer, using a program such as Adobe Acrobat Reader, you’d see your profile. Your name, LinkedIn headline, and email are at the top of the file, with your Summary, Experience, and Education sections organized neatly below, similar to a resume.

View Article
How to Modify Your LinkedIn Communications Settings

Article / Updated 06-21-2018

On the Communications Settings page, you see every major facet of communications involving LinkedIn, starting with Basics: what kind of notifications should LinkedIn alert you to, what kinds of messages you want to receive from members, who can invite you, how often LinkedIn can email you, and what options you want when using LinkedIn messaging. You also look at group settings, such as whether you are open to receiving invitations to join a LinkedIn group or whether you want your network to know when you join a group. Finally, you check out the Messages section, where you can decide whether you want to receive invitations for LinkedIn research efforts. To begin reviewing the Communications settings, click the Me icon on the top navigation bar of any LinkedIn page. Below the Account heading, click Settings & Privacy, and then click the Communications header. The Communications screen appears. You can make the following changes to your communications settings: To decide which actions on LinkedIn will appear on your LinkedIn Notifications screen: Click Change next to Notifications on LinkedIn. The screen shown below appears, displaying the major categories of events that can create notifications. Click a category in the Notifications screen. You see a list of events in that category that could trigger a notification. Each option has a slider button that you can set to On or Off. If you want to be notified when the event occurs, set it to On; otherwise, set it to Off. To determine how often LinkedIn emails you and for what reasons: Click the Change link next to E-Mail Frequency. The Email Frequency page appears. Each section, such as Invitations, has universal On and Off settings. Click the Details link to expand the list of options. Review the list of options and decide in each circumstance how you want to receive your emails. The available choices follow: Recommended: Based on the category, LinkedIn will send you a summary of messages if you have a lot of incoming messages or notify you only of items you may have missed when using the site. Individual Email: As soon as something occurs in a given category, such as an introduction, an invitation, or a job notification, LinkedIn sends you an email with that one item in the email. Weekly Digest Email or Daily Digest Email: Instead of individual emails, LinkedIn groups activities in a given category and sends you one email in a digest format, with a summary at the top and the detailed activities below. Note that daily digests are for group updates, and weekly digests are for general and group updates. Not every category has a digest option. If you don’t want to receive any emails for a given circumstance, set the condition to Off, using the slider setting on the right. However, you can still read the message when you’re logged into the LinkedIn site. Repeat these steps for each category in the list of Which Emails Do You Want to Receive. Spending time to visit each category and make wise decisions on what needs an immediate email, what can be summarized in a digest, and what isn’t needed can save you lots of time.When you have finished with the Email Frequency setting, click the Back to All Settings link (at the top of the screen). If you want to control who can send you an invitation to connect on LinkedIn: Click the Change link next to Who Can Send You Invitations. You can choose everyone on LinkedIn; only people who know your email address or appear in your imported contacts list; or only people who appear on your imported contacts list. If you choose one of the last two options, a new potential contact must either know your email or be someone whom you have imported from your email program, for example. This setting is especially helpful if you need to control who is in your network. To control unsolicited messages from other LinkedIn members or third parties: Click Change next to Messages from Members and Partners. Two questions regarding potential incoming communications appear. You can say Yes or No to receiving an InMail, which is a paid email from a LinkedIn member who is not a member of your network. You can also say Yes or No to receiving sponsored InMail, which is typically a message containing a marketing or promotional message from a LinkedIn partner or advertiser. Your name and email address are not disclosed by responding Yes; you are simply receiving the message and can decide on your own whether to respond. To create a more dynamic experience when messaging someone on LinkedIn: Click Change next to Read Receipts and Typing Indicators. If you set this option to On, as you are typing a message on LinkedIn, the recipient will see the typing indicator (three dots). (And you will see the typing indicator when the other person is typing.) In addition, both of you will see a read receipt, which is confirmation that the other party has seen your reply. This feature is similar to that on other social media networks and makes LinkedIn a little more familiar to use when messaging. To get pre-programmed replies you can click when sending a message: Click Change next to Messaging Smart Replies. This feature appears only on certain messages where LinkedIn can automatically provide a potentially helpful reply to an incoming message. To decide whether you are open to receiving notifications and from and invitations to LinkedIn groups: Click Groups from the left sidebar. Click Change next to Group Invitations and change the setting to Yes if you want to receive invitations to join a group. Click Change next to Group Notifications and change the setting to Yes if you want an update sent to your network when you join a group. To receive invitations to participate in LinkedIn’s research efforts: Click the Change link next to Participate in Research. Or click LinkedIn Messages from the left sidebar. Change the setting to Yes. This completes your options in Communications settings.

View Article
How to Make Basic LinkedIn Account Changes

Article / Updated 06-20-2018

When you go to make changes to your LinkedIn account, you’ll likely start with Account settings. On this Settings page, you see the basics of your account, what automatically plays or is saved when you use the account, and even how to download a set of your data. Let’s then move to Partners and Services, where you configure how you work with other services, and finish with Subscriptions and Account, which control your account status. To review the settings under Accounts, begin by clicking the Me icon on the top navigation bar of any LinkedIn page. Then under the Account header, click Settings & Privacy. The Settings & Privacy screen appears. Click Basic if necessary (it’s usually selected by default). Following are the basic settings you can update, either one at a time or all at once, depending on whether you’re in the initial setup phase or refining your account as time goes by. Here’s how to update the basic Account settings: To add another email address to your account: Scroll down a little bit to E-Mail Address, and click its Change link. The screen shown below appears. When you started your LinkedIn account, you had to provide a valid email address. But if you use multiple email addresses, or have a past email account that previous colleagues or friends used with you, you probably want to add them to your account so that more people can find you. Don’t worry; the email addresses are not publicly viewable unless you give the okay. Click the Add E-Mail Address link. Add the new email address in the text box provided. Click the Send Verification button. LinkedIn sends a verification email to the address you’ve provided. Click the link in the verification email. To choose a new primary email: Click Make Primary next to the email address. To get rid of an email address: Click Remove next to the address. This feature is useful if an email account becomes inactive or is hacked, or you don’t want it associated with your account. To associate a phone number with your account: Click Change next to Phone Numbers. Click the Add Phone Number link and then choose the Country from the newly displayed drop-down list. Add the phone number in the New Phone Number box. Click the Send Code button to send the number to LinkedIn. When you receive a text message from LinkedIn with a 6-digit verification code, add that code in the appropriate text. You might want to associate a phone number with your account so that LinkedIn can call or text your phone to verify your identity if you forget your password. To change your password: Click Change next to the Change Password setting. Below the Change link is a date for the last time you changed your password. Type your new password twice, and then verify that you’re not a computer or robot. Click the Save button. LinkedIn updates your account with your new password. To change the language, name, location or industry associated with your account: Scroll down and click Change next to the appropriate setting. Follow the steps presented and fill in the information as appropriate for you, and then click Close. If you get married and your name changes, you may want to update your name here. And of course, if you move, you’ll want to change your Location setting. If a new job means you are now working in a different industry, change your Industry setting so people see the appropriate setting on your LinkedIn page. To see where you have an open, active LinkedIn session: Scroll down a little bit, and click Change next to Where You’re Signed In. When you’ve finished reviewing this section, click Close. Every time you bring up LinkedIn on your computer, tablet, smartphone, or other Internet-capable device, you create a new session tied to your account. When you expand this option, you see not only your current session, but also any additional sessions and the length of time those sessions have been open. To close any sessions that you’re no longer using, click Sign Out of All These Sessions or click Sign Out for an individual session. In this way, someone else with access to your device won’t also have access to your account. To update the sources used to build your LinkedIn news feed, click Change next to Feed Preferences. You can change the sources of your news feed if you choose. To allow other people to mention you in LinkedIn posts and comments: Click Change next to Mentions by Others, and change the setting to Yes. To make videos on your LinkedIn screen play automatically: Click Change next to Autoplay Videos, and make sure the setting is set to Yes. To hide the profile photos of people you see on LinkedIn: Click Change next to Showing Profile Photos. Change the Select Whose Photos You’d Like to See setting to No One. These settings can be helpful if you have a slow Internet connection and want to optimize how much data is coming through when you use LinkedIn. If you prevent videos from playing and pictures from displaying, your LinkedIn web pages should load faster if you have a slow connection. If you frequently use LinkedIn to apply for jobs: Click Change next to Saving Job Application Answers. Set to Yes the filter that allows LinkedIn to save the answers to your job application. Now when you apply to jobs on LinkedIn, you’ll be able to store certain answers so you can reuse them on future applications. In addition, you’ll be able to use the Stored Job Applicant Accounts setting to manage which account info you want saved as part of your LinkedIn account. To download your LinkedIn data from the server: Click Change next to Download Your Data. A number of options are available for data you can retrieve from LinkedIn’s servers. To manage which websites you’ve authorized to share data with LinkedIn: Click Change next to Permitted Services. Or click the Partners & Services link from the left sidebar. When you open your list of permitted services, you’ll see a list of processes that can interface with your LinkedIn account. To delete a function that you don’t want interfacing with your account, click the function’s Remove link. To connect your Twitter account to your LinkedIn account: Click Change next to Twitter Settings. You can add one or more Twitter accounts to your LinkedIn account, and set whether you want to display your Twitter account in your LinkedIn profile.One of the primary benefits of linking the two accounts is if you want to share LinkedIn updates, long-form posts, or articles with your Twitter followers. Be warned that sharing every post on Twitter, as well as LinkedIn, could be seen as off-putting to your Twitter followers, so share when appropriate. To upgrade your account to a paid Premium account: Click Change next to Try Premium for Free. Or click the Subscriptions link in the left sidebar. To close your LinkedIn account for good: Click Change next to Closing Your LinkedIn Account. main reason to use this setting is if you have more than one LinkedIn account, which is addressed next. To merge two LinkedIn accounts: Click the Change link next to Merging LinkedIn Accounts. Provide the login information for your duplicate account, and then click Submit. Perhaps you joined LinkedIn years ago and did a little business, but then forgot your login information and created a new account a few years later. When you have multiple accounts, people will find it confusing and wonder which account to connect with or send messages to. Therefore, LinkedIn enables you to merge accounts, without losing any connections on the old account. When you click Change, you see the account you’re currently logged into. In the boxes, enter the email address and password for your second account. After you click Submit, LinkedIn transfers your connections from the second account to the first account, and allows you to review and confirm the transfer. After you do that, LinkedIn closes the second account.

View Article
Using the Settings & Privacy Page as a LinkedIn Command Console

Article / Updated 06-20-2018

The LinkedIn Settings & Privacy page is, by default, full of information about how you interact with the site. Think of the Settings & Privacy page as your command console for working with LinkedIn. You can get to the page at any time by clicking the Me icon, on the top navigation bar, and then clicking Settings & Privacy under Account. Your Settings & Privacy page will look similar to most other users of LinkedIn, so it will probably look similar to the one below except the name, headline, number of connections, and date you joined LinkedIn will reflect your own account. First, check out the three headers across the middle of the screen: Account, Privacy, and Communications. Just click one of the three to go to that page of settings. Note that as you scroll down the page, the headers stay at the top of your screen. On the left side of the screen is a navigation menu. You can click any section name in the left menu to jump to that part of the selected Settings page. For example, the Account page has four sections: Basics, Partners and Services, Subscriptions, and Account. Below, the Basics section is selected. As you scroll down through a section of the Account page, the section menu item is highlighted. Note the Change link to the right of each setting. When you want to change a setting, start by clicking Change. The area below the setting expands so you can make changes on the same page. For example, below, Change next to the Phone Numbers setting was clicked so that a phone number could be added to the account. The section expanded, displaying a description of the setting and an Add Phone Number link. Always click the Close link (where the Change link used to be) to finish your changes, close the section, and move on.

View Article
page 1
page 2
page 3