Weight Training For Dummies book cover

Weight Training For Dummies

By: LaReine Chabut Published: 12-31-2014

Tone up, burn calories, stay strong

Weight Training For Dummies makes it easy to get started with weight training by offering trusted and straightforward guidance on the latest circuit and resistance training, and all-new information on the highly popular bodyweight and High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT). Whether you're working with dumbbells, free weight sets, or machines, you'll find out how to combine weight training with other exercise to properly strength train and get in the best shape of your life.

Along with aerobic exercise and flexibility, body weight training is an integral part of a complete physical activity program. But with all the different equipment and techniques available, getting started can feel overwhelming. Want to get pumped about weight training? Consider these facts: strength training, whether via free weights or a machine, builds muscle. And the more muscle you have, the higher your metabolism and the less prone you are to injuries—in and out of the gym. Plus, strength training promotes bone strength, which can significantly reduce your odds of developing osteoporosis. If that's not enough, strength training—unlike cardio workouts like running—reaps benefits almost immediately. So what are you waiting for? Weight Training For Dummies has everything you need to get started.

  • Provides examples and directions for powerful 20-minute weight training routines for the time challenged
  • Features advice to help you choose a weight training system that you enjoy and that fits into your lifestyle
  • Includes new coverage devoted to warm-ups and the hottest and most beneficial stretches
  • Introduces using weight training to address specific health or orthopedic conditions

Whether you're already in the gym several times a week or are just starting out with a fitness routine, Weight Training For Dummies shows you how to use free weights or weight machines to get results—fast.

Articles From Weight Training For Dummies

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52 results
52 results
Weight Training For Dummies Cheat Sheet

Cheat Sheet / Updated 02-15-2022

If you want to get into weight training, start by sorting fact from fiction. Don’t let stories you’ve heard about weight lifting keep you from the gym. You'll reach your fitness goals sooner by getting some simple home equipment and finding a qualified personal trainer. Follow some basic etiquette when working with a trainer and using the gym, and learn some muscle terminology so you’re comfortable with weight training.

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3 Nifty Dumbbell Products

Step by Step / Updated 03-27-2016

If you’re in the market for dumbbells for your weight training exercises and want to save money and/or space, here are a few inventive gadgets that might suit your needs.

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10 Ways to Use Exercise Bands to Tone and Tighten

Step by Step / Updated 03-27-2016

Bands and tubing can’t provide as much resistance as free weights or machines, but you can develop a surprising amount of strength, muscle tone, and flexibility. Here are ten band exercises and offer tips for using bands safely. Note: The photos accompanying the exercises show bands, but tubing can just as easily be used instead of the bands to supply the required resistance.

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3 Shoulder Exercises for Weight Training

Step by Step / Updated 03-27-2016

When you move your arms in virtually any direction — up, down, backward, forward, sideways, diagonally, or in circles — your shoulders are in charge or at least involved. The ingenious design of your shoulder joint makes the shoulders one of the most mobile, versatile muscle groups in your body. Unfortunately, their amazing capacity for movement also makes the shoulders, along with a nearby muscle group called the rotator cuff, particularly vulnerable to injury. Protect your shoulders by performing a variety of exercises.

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10 Ways to Have a Ball with Exercise Balls

Step by Step / Updated 03-27-2016

Use your ball exercises as part of your weekly strength-training routine or rotate ball exercises in and out of your regular workouts. The variety challenges your muscles in different ways and also keeps your workouts fresh and fun. As with all other resistance exercises, perform 8 to 15 repetitions per set and at least one set per muscle group, unless indicated otherwise in the specific exercise. When you can perform 15 repetitions easily, make the exercise tougher by decreasing the base of support (by picking up one foot or by bringing legs closer together) or by adding weight.

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3 Presses to Strengthen Your Chest Muscles

Step by Step / Updated 03-27-2016

You can change the feel and focus of many chest exercises by adjusting the angle of the bench you use. Performing chest exercises on a flat bench emphasizes those fibers in the center of your chest. When you adjust the bench a few degrees to an incline position, you shift the focus of the exercise to the fibers in your upper chest and shoulder muscles. Doing the opposite — adjusting the bench to a decline position — concentrates the work on the lower fibers of the chest. By the way, decline exercises are probably the least important category of chest exercises because they work a relatively small portion of the pecs.

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3 Upper-Back, Weight-Training Row Exercises

Step by Step / Updated 03-27-2016

Rowing exercises are similar to the motion of rowing a boat. You may perform rows with a barbell or dumbbell, a set of machine handles, a bar attached to a low cable pulley, or an exercise band. Rowing exercises use the same muscles as pull-downs and pull-ups, except that they don’t involve your chest. Rows are particularly helpful if you want to find out how to sit up straighter — to perform a row correctly on a machine, you have to sit up tall.

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3 Weight-Training Biceps Exercises

Step by Step / Updated 03-27-2016

Your biceps muscle spans the front of your upper arm. Hang out in any gym, and you’ll see people flexing these muscles in the mirror, usually when they think that nobody’s watching. The main job of your biceps (nicknamed your bis or your guns) is to bend your arm; in gymspeak, this motion is called curling or flexing.

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5 Popular Attachments for Cable Weight Machines

Step by Step / Updated 03-27-2016

Not all machines use a cam. A class of equipment called cable machines uses a typical round pulley. A cable machine is a vertical metal beam, called a tower, with a pulley attached. You can adjust the height of the pulley to move it close to the floor, up over your head, or anywhere in between. Some cable machines have two towers. Cable machines are more versatile than Nautilus-type machines. Clip a new handle onto the pulley and you instantly create a new exercise. At most gyms, you see a large heap of metal bars and handles sitting in a plastic container or milk crate. This pile may look like junk but, actually, it’s more like a treasure chest. By attaching these handles to a cable pulley, you create an unlimited variety of exercises. Some people are afraid to go near this pile, so they simply use whatever bar happens to already be attached to the cable. But if you frequently switch the handles, your workout can be more fun. Here’s a rundown of the most popular cable attachments:

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4 Weight-Training Triceps Exercises

Step by Step / Updated 03-27-2016

Your triceps, located directly opposite your biceps, spans the rear of your upper arm. The biceps and triceps, like many muscle groups, work together in pairs. When you squeeze your biceps, your triceps relaxes and your arm bends, and when you squeeze your triceps, your biceps relaxes and your arm straightens. Maintaining a good balance of strength in the relationship between the two muscles is important so that one muscle doesn’t dominate the other. That’s why you need to train both.

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