Tips for Making YouTube Animal Videos

By Rob Ciampa, Theresa Moore, John Carucci, Stan Muller, Adam Wescott

Take an informal survey and you’ll discover an insatiable fondness for YouTube videos that feature animals. People love to watch them over and over as well as share and share. That probably explains why the most viral content is content that features your four‐legged friends. The recent Mutant Giant Spider Dog video has already attracted more than 125 million views.

And spider dog is not alone. Numerous videos are dedicated to the feline accomplishments, too, like cats answering with meows, fraternizing with dogs, or just being cute.

But the animal video is not dominated entirely by dogs and cats. In fact, you’ll encounter every animal imaginable on YouTube. Horses, cows, monkeys, and even lions and tigers and bears are represented on YouTube.

So if you think your pet has what it takes to be a YouTube sensation, it’s time to break out the ol’ camcorder and make Fido a star.

Follow these tips for making animal videos on YouTube:

  • Keep it short. Many of the most‐watched videos on YouTube are often less than a minute long. That, apparently, is all it takes for a major dose of cute. And shorter videos attract more clicks.

  • Find a willing participant. Some dogs — and other animals, for that matter — are more inclined than others to ham it up for the camera. If you have one with the acting bug, consider taking out your camera because — who knows? You may have a potential star on your hands.

    Windee the Airedale gets ready to shoot a scene.

    Windee the Airedale gets ready to shoot a scene.
  • Nail down the right location. That’s what they say it all comes down to — why else would they repeat it three times? It does add value to the video when you find the right place. If it’s a house pet, that can mean a tidy space in a part of your place that has sufficient lighting and is free of clutter. For outdoor situations, choose an area free of clutter, and make sure the sun is at your back.

  • Reward the participants. Dogs and cats work for treats, so when they do a good job, it’s important to compensate them.