Project 2016 For Dummies book cover

Project 2016 For Dummies

Author:
Cynthia Snyder Dionisio
Published: March 21, 2016

Overview

The easy way to take control of project timelines, resources, budgets, and details

Project manager, meet your new assistant! Once you discover Project 2016 you'll be amazed at how efficient and effective the project management process can be. Written by an expert author who knows project management processes backward and forward, this friendly, hands-on guide shows you how to get started, enter tasks and estimate durations, work with resources and costs, fine-tune your schedule, set baselines, collect data, analyze progress, and keep your projects on track.

How many times have you heard people in the office mutter under their breath, 'These projects never run on time?' Well, now they can! Project 2016 For Dummies shows you how to use the latest version of Microsoft Project to create realistic project timelines, make the most of available resources, keep on top of all those pesky details, and, finally, complete your project on time and on budget. Easy!

  • Fully updated to reflect the latest software changes in Microsoft Project 2016
  • All-new case studies and examples highlight the relevance of key features of Microsoft Project 2016
  • Exposes the correlation between what project managers do and how Microsoft Project 2016 supports their work
  • Covers working with calendars, using and sharing resources, budgeting, gathering and tracking data, and more

If you're a time-pressured project manager looking to make your life—and your projects—easier, Project 2016 For Dummies shows you how to get things done!

The easy way to take control of project timelines, resources, budgets, and details

Project manager, meet your new assistant! Once you discover Project 2016 you'll be amazed at how efficient and effective the project management process can be. Written by an expert author who knows project management processes backward and forward, this friendly, hands-on guide shows you how to get started, enter tasks and estimate durations, work with resources and costs, fine-tune your schedule, set baselines, collect data, analyze progress, and keep your projects on track.

How many times have you heard people in the office mutter under their breath, 'These projects never run on time?' Well, now they can! Project 2016 For Dummies shows you how to use the latest version of Microsoft Project

to create realistic project timelines, make the most of available resources, keep on top of all those pesky details, and, finally, complete your project on time and on budget. Easy!
  • Fully updated to reflect the latest software changes in Microsoft Project 2016
  • All-new case studies and examples highlight the relevance of key features of Microsoft Project 2016
  • Exposes the correlation between what project managers do and how Microsoft Project 2016 supports their work
  • Covers working with calendars, using and sharing resources, budgeting, gathering and tracking data, and more

If you're a time-pressured project manager looking to make your life—and your projects—easier, Project 2016 For Dummies shows you how to get things done!

Project 2016 For Dummies Cheat Sheet

Project 2016, one incarnation of Microsoft’s popular project management software, offers a tremendous wealth of functionality. However, Microsoft Project 2016 probably isn’t like any other software you’ve ever used, so mastering it can seem a daunting process. This Cheat Sheet provides you with tips and tricks for doing what you do every day as a project manager.

Articles From The Book

30 results

Project Articles

The Project 2016 AutoFilter Feature

The Project 2016 AutoFilter feature is turned on by default for all new schedule files. Arrows appear in the column headings in the displayed sheet. When you click the arrow in the Resource Names column, for example, the name of every resource assigned to tasks in the project is listed in alphabetical order, along with other filtering and sorting choices. See the following figure for an example. In the AutoFilter list for a column, select check boxes to control which items appear onscreen. Selected items appear, and deselected items are hidden by the filter. If you want to display only a few items, clear the Select All check box first to deselect all items and then select the check boxes next to individual items to reselect them. Then click OK and your filter is applied. You can also choose the Filters option from an AutoFilter menu to access predefined filters. For example, this figure shows the predefined Is Greater Than filter that's available to the cost-related fields in the Cost table. In this case, the filter shows any task with a cost (total cost) between $2,000 and $4,000. Follow these steps to use AutoFilter:

  1. Display the view and table that contain the fields (columns) you want to filter. Arrows appear at the top of every column.
  2. Click the arrow on the column you want to filter.
  3. Use the Filters submenu to select a filter. Select a predefined filter. For example, if you're filtering for task cost, you can choose filters in the Total Cost column that look for costs greater than, equal to, or less than specified amounts. You can also set up another filter that looks for costs between two specified amounts. The Clear Filter from Field Name choice removes a previously applied filter.
  4. Click the OK button. Any task that doesn't meet your criteria temporarily disappears from the view.

To apply highlighting to items that meet your filter criteria rather than remove nonmatching items from view, use the Highlight list in the Data group on the View tab. This list works like the filter does except that it highlights the applicable tasks.

Project Articles

How to Handle Project 2016 Task Warnings and Suggestions

When you work with auto-scheduled tasks, Project 2016 can reschedule them for you when you establish task dependencies. Because the start and finish dates of manually scheduled tasks are hard-wired (fixed), Project loses the useful ability to move them around when predecessor task schedules change. Even though Project can't automatically move manually scheduled tasks, it performs forecasted calculations for completing each manually scheduled task based on the task's links and other drivers. If Project finds that a potential scheduling problem may occur with a manually scheduled task, it alerts you — even when the Task Inspector pane isn't open. These alerts appear in the form of warnings (a red diamond with an exclamation point inside) and suggestions. Warnings represent problems that are likely to cause the project to finish off schedule, suggestions provide ideas for optimizing the schedule, perhaps improving on the projected finish date. The following figure shows a warning that the task will go past its deadline. You can see that there is also an overallocation icon that indicates that the task has overallocated resources. Right-click the task with the warning to display a shortcut menu with options for addressing the potential schedule problem at the top, as shown here. If you want to apply a schedule change option, click it on the shortcut menu. Here's a rundown of the choices you may see:

  • Reschedule to Available Date: If an overallocated resource is assigned to the task, this choice reschedules all or part of the task to a time frame when the resource is available to handle the work.
  • Respect Links: This warning solution moves the task based on the timing of its predecessor task. In most cases, this solution moves the task later based on the predecessor task's schedule.
  • Switch to Auto Schedule: This warning solution typically appears for manually scheduled summary tasks. It also appears as a suggestion solution for subtasks. Choosing this schedule change causes the summary task to recalculate based on the roll-up values of its subtasks. For subtasks, the switch typically means that the task can move to an earlier spot in the schedule, potentially improving the schedule for any successor tasks, too.
  • Fix in Task Inspector: Clicking this choice opens the Task Inspector pane so that you can review the drivers and other scheduling factors for the task before choosing a schedule change.
  • Ignore Problems for This Task: This option allows the overallocated resources to remain overallocated. It will keep the warning indicator if the task is still expected to go past its deadline.

Schedule warnings appear by default. To view suggestions, select the Task tab and click the drop-down arrow on the Inspect Task button in the Task group. Then choose Show Suggestions.

Task scheduling warnings and suggestions typically don't appear unless you've outlined the task list, creating summary tasks. Because some of the warning and scheduling calculations are based on summary task information, you should follow the good practice of organizing the schedule using the work breakdown structure.

Project Articles

How to Assign Material Resources in Project 2016

Calculating the cost of a material project resource in might take you back to solving problems in your old high school algebra class. Fortunately, Project 2016 makes a straightforward calculation to arrive at the cost of using a material resource. When you assign a work resource to a task, Project multiplies its standard hourly rate by the hours of work for the assignment. But material resources don't have hours of work: You pay for them by the unit quantity, not by the hour. So when you set up a material resource, you specify a standard rate for a single unit (per yard, or ton, or gallon, for example) and assign a certain number of units to each task. The cost is the number of units multiplied by the cost per use. To assign a standard unit rate for a material resource, follow these steps:

  1. Display Resource Sheet view.
  2. If you haven't already done so, click the Material Label column for that resource and then type a unit name (such as gallon).
  3. Click the Std Rate column for the resource you want to set and then type a dollar amount (such as the cost per gallon).
  4. Press Enter or Tab to finish the entry.
The following figure shows that the water and beverages are set up at a cost per gallon, with a setup fee for the company to deliver and set up the water and beverage stations. You can also make cost-rate entries in the Resource Information dialog box. The Costs tab of this dialog box, shown here, offers columns labeled Standard Rate, Overtime Rate, and Per Use Cost. Note that you can also use the Resource Information dialog box to enter as many as five standard unit rates with effective dates to account for fluctuations in unit cost over the life of the project.