Outlook 2016 For Dummies book cover

Outlook 2016 For Dummies

By: Bill Dyszel Published: 10-26-2015

Be more productive and simplify your life with Outlook 2016!

Ever feel like you're drowning in your inbox? Outlook 2016 For Dummies helps you lower the metaphorical water levels by quickly prioritizing incoming email. Instead of wading through messages and tasks all day, use Outlook as it was intended—as a productivity tool—to organize your tasks on the to-do bar, filter junk email, make the most of Outlook's anti-phishing capabilities, manage email folders, use smart scheduling tools, leverage RSS support, collect electronic business cards, and integrate your Microsoft OneNote, Project, Access, and SharePoint files. This book is updated to reflect the latest and greatest features integrated into the Outlook 2016 user interface to ensure you're at the top of your Outlook game.

With over 1.1 billion users worldwide and 90% market share for productivity suites, a figure that roughly translates into one in seven people the world over, odds are you'll need to learn how to use Microsoft Office programs—including Outlook—if you want to excel in the workplace.

  • Get up to speed on the new and improved features of Microsoft Office 2016
  • Take advantage of often overlooked features that can simplify your day
  • Discover new ways to filter junk email—and reclaim the hours that you spend sorting through spam each year
  • Organize tasks and schedule meetings, keeping everyone up to date on the latest project and account progress

If you're ready to take your productivity to the next level Outlook 2016 For Dummies is a must-read!

Articles From Outlook 2016 For Dummies

page 1
page 2
page 3
page 4
37 results
37 results
Outlook 2016 For Dummies Cheat Sheet

Cheat Sheet / Updated 03-25-2022

Sending email has never been easier than it is in Outlook 2016. You'll notice the familiar Ribbon interface, and you'll still find all the Outlook features you've come to love — plus some new ones. Use this handy Cheat Sheet to orient yourself with Outlook's new look and feel. There's also a helpful table of Outlook shortcut keys.

View Cheat Sheet
Outlook 2016 Shortcuts

Article / Updated 03-26-2016

You can accomplish tasks a lot faster when you use Outlook, and you can be even faster if you use Outlook's shortcut keys. The following tables offer several handy shortcuts to help you work more quickly and more efficiently with Outlook 2016. Outlook 2016 Shortcuts This Shortcut Creates One of These Ctrl+Shift+A Appointment Ctrl+Shift+C Contact Ctrl+Shift+L Distribution list Ctrl+Shift+E Folder Ctrl+Shift+M Email message Ctrl+Shift+N Note Ctrl+Shift+K Task Ctrl+Shift+Q Meeting request This Shortcut Switches To Ctrl+1 Mail Ctrl+2 Calendar Ctrl+3 Contacts Ctrl+4 Tasks Ctrl+5 Notes Ctrl+6 Folder List Ctrl+7 Shortcuts Ctrl+8 Journal This Shortcut Helps You Do This Ctrl+S or Shift+F12 Save Alt+S Save and close; Send F12 Save As Ctrl+Z Undo Ctrl+D Delete Ctrl+P Print F7 Check spelling Ctrl+Shift+V Move to folder Ins Mark complete Ctrl+F Forward

View Article
Outlook 2016's Contacts Home Tab

Article / Updated 03-26-2016

Outlook 2016's Contacts is more than just a list of names and email addresses. You can take advantage of the Contacts Home tab on the Outlook 2016 Ribbon to create new contacts, to arrange the way you view the contacts you have, or to create email messages or mail merge documents. The following image shows the popular Business Card view.

View Article
Outlook 2016's Tasks Home Tab

Article / Updated 03-26-2016

More than an email program, Outlook 2016 can also help you schedule and track personal and professional projects. On the Tasks Home tab on the Outlook 2016 Ribbon, you'll see tools for managing your workload more quickly and effectively, as shown in the following image. You can choose from a variety of views that can help you keep track of pressing priorities.

View Article
Outlook 2016's Mail Home Tab

Article / Updated 03-26-2016

The Mail Home tab on Outlook 2016's Ribbon contains all the tools you need for daily email tasks as well as for managing the messages you accumulate and retain for reference. The following image shows you what each of Outlook 2016's Mail Home tab buttons can help you do.

View Article
How to Change a Note's Size in Outlook

Article / Updated 03-26-2016

You may be an old hand at moving and resizing boxes in Windows. Notes in Outlook follow all the rules that other Windows boxes follow, so you'll be okay. If you're new to Windows and dialog boxes, don't worry — notes are as easy to resize as they are to write and read. To change the size of a note, follow these steps: Click the Notes button in the Navigation pane (or press Ctrl+5). Your list of notes appears. Double-click the title of the note you want to open. The note pops up. Move your mouse pointer to the lower-right corner of the note until the mouse pointer changes into a two-headed arrow pointed on a diagonal. Use this arrow to drag the edges of the note to resize it. Don't be alarmed. Resizing boxes is much easier to do than to read about. After you resize one box, you'll have no trouble resizing another. Drag with your mouse until the note box is the size you want it to be. As you drag the mouse pointer around, the size of your note box changes, as shown in the following image. If the size isn't what you want, you can change the size again by dragging with the mouse.

View Article
How to Peek into a Journal in Outlook

Article / Updated 03-26-2016

As with other Outlook modules, the Journal comes with multiple views that show your entries in different ways — whether that's a record of phone calls or a list organized by the names of the people you've dealt with. The Current View choices on the Ribbon let you quickly change from one view to the next. Timeline view The Timeline view is an arrangement that shows a strange little chronologically ordered diagram of all your Journal entries to show which entries you created first and which you created last. If you keep track of the time you spend on such things as phone calls, longer calls take up more space than shorter ones. Clicking the Timeline button on the Ribbon does no harm, but it does very little good either. Entry List view The Entry List view shows the whole tomato; it's a view that lists all your Journal entries — regardless of whom, what, or when. To see the Entry List view, click the Entry List button on the Ribbon's Current View section. You can click the heading at the top of any column to sort the list according to the information in that column. If you want to arrange your list of Journal entries by the type of entry, for example, click the Entry Type header. Your list is sorted alphabetically by type of entry, with conversations before email, email before faxes, and so on. Phone Calls view Because you can keep track of your phone calls in the Journal, the Journal lists the calls you've tracked. Simply click the Phone Calls button on the Ribbon. To print a list of your phone calls, switch to Phone Calls view and press Ctrl+P. Last 7 Days view The items you're likely to need first are the ones you used last. That's why the Last 7 Days view offers a quick way to see your most recent activities. To see a week's worth of Journal entries, click the Last 7 Days button on the Ribbon's Current View section. Documents you've created, phone calls, email messages — anything you've done on your computer in the last seven days — are in the Last 7 Days view. This view shows anything you've worked on during the last week, including documents you may have originally created a long time ago. That's why you may see some pretty old dates in this view.

View Article
How to Keep a Journal in Outlook

Article / Updated 03-26-2016

To get good use from the Journal in Outlook, you have to use it (details, details . . .). You can set Outlook to make Journal entries for nearly everything you do or you can shut the Journal off entirely and make no entries in it. If you put nothing in the Journal, you get nothing out. In previous versions of Outlook, you could record everything automatically, but that feature is no longer supported in Outlook 2016. You must enter selected items manually: Create a Journal entry. Drag an item to the Journal folder. For example, you may not want to record every transaction with a prospective client until you're certain you're doing business with that client. You can drag relevant email messages to the Journal for a record of serious inquiries. When you actually start doing business with a new client, you can set up automatic recording. To manually record items in the Journal, follow these steps: Click Folders in the Navigation pane (or press Ctrl+6). The Folder list, which has a small icon for the Journal, appears in the Navigation pane. Drag the item you want to record (such as an email message or a task) to the Journal icon in the Folder list. The Journal Entry form shows an icon that represents the item you're recording, along with the item's name. Fill in the information you want to record. You don't have to record anything. The text box at the bottom of the screen gives you space for making a note to yourself if you want to use it. Click the Save & Close button. The item you recorded is entered in the Journal. You can see your new entry when you view your Journal. Sometimes, when you want to find a document or a record of a conversation, you don't remember what you called the document or where you stored it, but you do remember when you created or received the item. In this case, you can go to the Journal and check the date.

View Article
How to Forward a Note in Outlook

Article / Updated 03-26-2016

Forwarding a note in Outlook really means sending an email message with a note included as an attachment. It's helpful if the person to whom you're forwarding the note also uses Outlook. To forward a note, follow these steps: Click Notes in the Navigation pane. The Notes list appears. Click the title of the note you want to forward. Click the Forward button on the Ribbon's Home tab. The New Message form appears. Click the To text box and type the email address of the person who should get your note. Or do this: Click the To button to open the email Address Book. Look up the name of the person to whom you want to forward your note. Click the To button. Click the OK button. Type the note's subject in the Subject box. The subject of your note is already in the Subject box of the New Message form. You can leave it alone or type something else. If you want, type a message in the text box. You don't have to include a message. Your note may say all you want to say. Click the Send button. Your message is sent off to its intended recipient(s). If your Outlook note has the address of a page on the World Wide Web (such as www.dummies.com), you can click the address to open your web browser — just as you can in all the other Outlook modules.

View Article
How to View Notes in Outlook

Article / Updated 03-26-2016

Notes in Outlooke are handy enough to stash tidbits of information any way you want, but what makes notes really useful is what happens when you need to get the stuff back. You can open your notes one by one and see what's in them, but Outlook's Notes module offers even handier arranging, sorting, and viewing options. Decide what makes sense for you. Icon view Some folks like the Icon view — just a bunch of notes scattered all over, as they are on your desk. Some people prefer organized lists for viewing their notes on their computers, but you may like the more free-form Icon view. To use the Icon view, click the Icon button in the Current View section on the Ribbon, as shown in the following image. When you do, the screen fills with a bunch of icons and incredibly long titles for each icon. Outlook uses the first line of your message as the title of the icon, so the screen gets cluttered fast. If you prefer creative clutter, this view is for you. If not, keep reading. Notes List view The Notes List view is as basic as basic gets. Just the facts, ma'am. The Notes List view shows the subject and creation date of each note. To see the Notes List view, click the words Notes List in the Current View section of the Navigation pane to list your notes, as shown in the following image. The Notes List view is recommended for opening, forwarding, reading, and otherwise dealing with notes because it's the most straightforward. Anything you can do to a note in the Notes List view can be done in the other Notes views. The difference is that the other views don't always let you see the note to which you want to do things. Last 7 Days view The notes you've dealt with in the last few days are most likely to be the notes you'll need today. Outlook has a special view of the notes you changed in the last seven days. To see your notes for the last seven days, click the words Last 7 Days in the Current View section on the Ribbon. If you haven't changed any notes in the past seven days, Last 7 Days view will be empty. If having an empty view bothers you, create a note. That'll tide you over for a week. The Reading pane Outlook notes aren't all that tough to read — just click the Notes button in the Navigation pane and read away. If you tend to write lengthy notes and need to see the full text of your notes regularly, you can open the Reading pane by clicking the View tab and choosing Reading Pane. When you do that, any note you select will enlarge to fill half the screen.

View Article
page 1
page 2
page 3
page 4