Canon EOS Rebel T6/1300D For Dummies book cover

Canon EOS Rebel T6/1300D For Dummies

By: Julie Adair King Published: 08-01-2016

Your Canon EOS Rebel T6/1300D photography class—in a book!

The Canon EOS Rebel T6/1300D offers DLSR users a tool to take photographs truly worth bragging about. This book gives you the pointers and easy-to-follow instruction you need to make sense of your new camera and start taking those stunning shots—right out of its box.

First, it demystifies all the photography terms the pros use, explains your Canon camera's menus and settings, and shows how to take control of color, focus, and lighting. Once you have a grasp on those skills, you can apply your newfound knowledge to get better portraits, action shots, close ups, and other images.

If most of your photography experience has taken place behind the lens of a smartphone, fear not! You'll quickly and easily learn all about your Canon's tools for controlling focus and depth of field, getting vivid color, shooting landscapes, transferring your files to your computer, and so much more.

  • Get up to speed on your camera's settings and menu options
  • Take quick auto mode shots or be creative with manual settings
  • Apply your knowledge to get better portraits and action shots
  • Find tips for customizing your camera to suit your unique needs

If you love to take photos and want to up your game with a fantastic DSLR camera, Canon Rebel T6/1300D For Dummies is your fast track to getting picture-perfect snaps in a flash!

Articles From Canon EOS Rebel T6/1300D For Dummies

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28 results
28 results
Canon EOS Rebel T6/1300D For Dummies Cheat Sheet

Cheat Sheet / Updated 02-15-2022

Your Canon T6/1300D camera has so many features that it can be difficult to remember what each control does. To help you sort things out, study this handy reference to your Canon camera's external controls and exposure modes. Print out this guide, tuck it in your camera bag, and get a head start on taking great photographs!

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How to View Your Canon Rebel T6/1300D Photos and Movies on an HDTV

Article / Updated 11-14-2016

Your Rebel T6/1300D is equipped with a feature that allows you to play your pictures and movies on an HDTV screen. However, you need to purchase an HDMI cable to connect the camera and television; the Canon part number you need is HDMI cable HTC-100. This function isn't available when the camera's Wi-Fi feature is enabled. So head to Setup Menu 3 and set the Wi-Fi/NFC option to Disable. (Likewise, you can't use the Wi-Fi features when the camera is connected to a TV or your computer.) Next, turn the camera off and connect the smaller end of the HDMI cable to the HDMI port found under the cover on the left side of the camera. At this point, you need to check out your TV manual to locate the HDMI terminal on the TV (or other video playback screen) where you should connect your camera. You also need to consult your manual to find out which channel or input source to select for playback of signals from auxiliary devices. After you sort out those issues, turn on your camera to send the signal to the TV set. For the most part, you can control playback using the same camera controls as you normally do to view pictures on your camera monitor. But if you're playing movies or a slide show with background music, you must adjust the volume via your TV's audio controls.

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How to Present a Slide Show with Your Canon Rebel T6/1300D Photos

Article / Updated 11-14-2016

Ready to see a retrospective of your art? Check out the Slide Show option, which automatically displays pictures and movies one by one. You can view the show on the camera monitor or, for a better view, connect your camera to a TV for playback. One nice aspect of the Slide Show function is that you can specify which files you want to include. You can tell the camera to show just still photos, for example, or to display only photos that you rated highly using the Rating feature. To set up and run the slide show, follow these steps: Display Playback Menu 2 and choose Slide Show, as shown on the left. You see the screen shown on the right. The thumbnail shows the first image that will appear in the slide show if you stick with the current show settings. Use the cross keys to navigate to the file-selection box. Press the Set button. The file-selection box becomes active, with up and down arrows appearing to its right. Press the up or down cross keys to specify which files to include in your show. Choose from these settings: All Images: Includes all files, regardless of whether they’re still photos or movies. Date: Plays pictures or movies taken on a single date. As soon as you select the option, the DISP label underneath the option box turns white, clueing you in to the fact that you can press the DISP button to display a screen listing all the shooting dates on the memory card. Again, press the up or down cross keys to select a date and then press Set to exit the date list. Folder: Includes still photos and movies in the selected folder. Again, press DISP to display a list of folders and highlight the one you want to use, and then press Set to exit the folder list. Movies: Includes only movies. Stills: Includes only still photos. Rating: Selects photos and movies based on their rating. Press DISP to display a screen where you can specify the rating that qualifies a file for inclusion and to see how many files have that rating. After selecting the rating, press Set to exit the rating screen. Press Set. The file-selection box is deactivated. Highlight Set Up and then press Set. You cruise to this screen, which offers the following additional show options: Display Time: Determines how long each still photo appears on the screen. You can choose timing settings ranging from 1 to 20 seconds. Movies, however, are always played in their entirety. Repeat: Set this option to Enable if you want the show to play over and over until you decide you’ve had enough. Choose Disable to play the show only once. Transition Effect: You can enable one of five transition effects. (Experiment to see which one you prefer.) Choose Off if you don’t want any effects between slides. Background Music: The camera can play background music with your show, but you have to load the audio files onto the camera's memory card first. For this task, you must use Canon EOS Utility, a free program. See the program's instruction manual, also available for download, for help with this step. (Files must be in the .WAV audio format; if you don't have any, Canon makes some sample music files available for download as well.) If you do add music files to the memory card, use the Background Music option to enable or disable the music accompaniment. Leave the option set to Off, as it is by default, if you don't want to mess with this whole issue. After selecting your playback options, press Menu to return to the main Slide Show screen. Highlight Start and press Set to start the show. Your slide show begins playing. Use the camera buttons to control playback. Here's the list of playback functions: Pause/restart playback: Press the Set button. While the show is paused, you can press the right or left cross key to view the next or previous photo. Press Set again to continue playback from the current slide. Change the playback display style: Press the DISP button to cycle through the available styles, each of which presents different shooting data. Adjust audio volume: Rotate the Main dial. Exit the slide show: Press the Menu button twice to return to Playback Menu 2. Or press the Playback button to return to normal photo playback.

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How to Add Special Effects to Your Canon Rebel T6/1300D Photos

Article / Updated 11-14-2016

Your Rebel T6 gives you a variety of options with Creative Filters. With the Creative Filters, you can add special effects to your pictures. For example, these three versions of a city scene were created with these filters. When you use this feature, the camera creates a copy of your image and applies the filter to the copy; your original remains intact. If the original was captured using the Raw Quality setting, the altered image is stored in the JPEG format. You can choose from these effects: Grainy B/W: Creates a black-and-white photo with a speckled appearance. Soft Focus: Blurs the photo to make it look soft and fuzzy. Fish-Eye: Distorts your photo so that it appears to have been shot using a fish-eye lens, as illustrated in the top-right image above. Toy Camera: Creates an image with dark corners — called a vignette effect. Vignetting is caused by poor-quality lenses not letting enough light in to expose the entire frame of film (like in toy cameras). When you choose this effect, you can also add a warm (yellowish) or cool (blue) tint. For example, this effect was applied with a warm tint to create the lower-left variation above. Miniature: Creates a trick of the eye by playing with depth of field. It blurs all but a very small area of the photo to create a result that looks something like one of those miniature dioramas you see in museums. This filter was applied to the city scene to produce the lower-right variation above. This effect works best on pictures taken from a high angle. To try out the filters, take either of these approaches: Quick Control screen: After setting the camera to Playback mode, press the Q button and then use the up/down cross keys to highlight the Creative Filters option, as shown on the left. Symbols representing the available filters appear at the bottom of the screen. Use the left/right cross keys to highlight a filter icon, as shown on the right, and then press Set. You see a preview of your photo with the currently selected filter active. You have the option of making changes to the settings before you apply and save: Press Set to display options available for the selected filter. The screen on the right side shows the adjustment available for the Soft Focus filter, for example. For the Miniature effect, use the up or down cross keys to change the position of the focus frame, which determines which part of the image is kept in sharp focus. Press the DISP button to change the orientation of the focus box. Playback Menu 1: Highlight Creative Filters and press Set. The camera shifts to Playback mode. Use the cross keys or Main dial to select a photo, press Set, use the cross keys to select a filter, and then press Set again to access any available filter options. After adjusting those settings, press Set. Either way, after your final press of the Set button, you're asked whether you want to save the altered image as a new file. Choose OK and press Set. Or, if you want to cancel out of the operation, press Menu. You're returned to the filter-selection screen so that you can choose a different filter.

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How to Create Custom Folders on Your Canon Rebel T6/1300D

Article / Updated 11-14-2016

Normally, your Rebel T6 automatically creates folders to store your images. The first folder has the name 100Canon; the second, 101Canon; the third, 102Canon; and so on. Each folder can hold 9,999 photos. If you want to create a new folder before the existing one is full, choose Select Folder from Setup Menu 1 and then choose Create Folder. You might take this organizational step so that you can segregate work photos from personal photos, for example. The camera asks for permission to create the folder; choose OK and press Set. The folder is automatically assigned the next available folder number and is selected as the active folder — the one that will hold any new photos you shoot. Press the Set button to return to Setup Menu 1. To make a different folder the active folder, choose Select Folder again, choose the folder you want to use, and press Set. If you select a folder that contains images, two thumbnails appear to the right of the folder name. The top thumbnail shows the first image in the folder, along with the last four numbers of its filename. The bottom thumbnail shows the last image in the folder.

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How to Customize the AE Lock and Shutter Buttons on Your Canon Rebel T6/1300D

Article / Updated 11-14-2016

By default, you initiate autofocusing on your Rebel T6/1300D by pressing the shutter button halfway and lock autoexposure by pressing the AE (autoexposure) Lock button. You should stick with this setup while learning about your camera; otherwise, the instructions in the camera manual won’t work. But after you feel more comfortable, you may want to customize the locking behaviors of the two buttons. To configure the buttons, set the Mode dial to P, Tv, Av, or M. Then head for Custom Function 8. You can choose from the following configuration options. The part of the option name before the slash indicates the result of pressing the shutter button halfway; the name after the slash indicates the result of pressing the AE Lock button. AF/AE Lock: This is the default setting. Pressing the shutter button halfway initiates autofocus; pressing the AE Lock button locks autoexposure. AE Lock/AF: With this option, pressing the shutter button halfway locks autoexposure. To initiate autofocusing, you instead press the AE Lock button. In other words, this mode is the exact opposite of the default setup. AF/AF Lock, No AE Lock: Pressing the shutter button halfway initiates autofocusing and exposure metering, and pressing the AE Lock button locks focus. Autoexposure lock isn’t possible. This option is designed to prevent focusing mishaps when you use AI Servo autofocusing. In AI Servo mode, the autofocus motor continually adjusts focus from the time you press the shutter button halfway until the time you take the image. This feature helps keep moving objects focused. But if something moves in front of your subject, the camera may mistakenly focus on that object instead. To cope with that possibility, this locking option enables you to initiate autofocusing as usual, by pressing the shutter button halfway. But at any time before you take the picture, you can hold down the AE Lock button to stop the autofocusing motor from adjusting focus. Releasing the button restarts autofocusing. Exposure is set at the time you take the picture. AE/AF, No AE Lock: In this mode, press the shutter button halfway to initiate autoexposure and press the AE Lock button to autofocus. In AI Servo mode, continuous autofocusing occurs only while you hold down the AE Lock button, which is helpful if your subject repeatedly moves and then stops. Exposure is set at the moment you take the picture.

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How to Transfer Photos from Your Canon Rebel T6/1300D to Your Smart Device

Article / Updated 11-14-2016

After you assign your Rebel T6 a Wi-Fi name, follow these instructions to connect your camera to your phone or tablet for file transfer. Note that these steps relate to transferring to a device that doesn't offer NFC connectivity. On the camera, open Setup Menu 3 and choose Wi-Fi Function, located just below the Wi-Fi/NFC option. The next screen offers two icons: one that looks like a phone and one that looks like a globe. Highlight the phone icon and press Set. Now you see the Connection Method screen, which offers two options: Easy Connection and Select a Network. Choose Easy Connection, press Set to highlight OK, and press Set again. On the resulting screen, the camera displays the nickname that you assigned your camera. You also see an encryption key, a string of characters that serve as the password to your camera's Wi-Fi network. On your smartphone or tablet, enable Wi-Fi and then open the wireless settings screen. Your camera's nickname should appear on the list of available Wi-Fi connections. Select the camera from the list of networks and, when prompted for a password, enter the encryption key shown on the camera monitor. On your phone or tablet, start the Canon Camera Connect app. If all the planets are in alignment, a screen should appear on your device that asks you to select the camera to finalize the connection. On the camera, press DISP to specify which images you want to access. You can select All Images, images from just the past few days, images assigned a particular rating, or a specific file-number range. If you choose anything but All Images, you can then set parameters for the file selection. After selecting the types of images you want to access, press the Set button as needed to exit the camera screens. The monitor goes dark, and the app shows that the camera is connected. The image below offers a look at the Android version of the app; you get the same options on an Apple iOS device, although the window dressing is a little different. On your device, choose Images on Camera. Thumbnails of your images appear, as shown on the right. To transfer an image, tap its thumbnail and then tap the send to device icon. A progress bar appears as the file is sent to the phone or tablet. That's the basic concept; here are a few more pieces of the puzzle that may help: After you get to the thumbnails screen, you can adjust a few aspects of the file transfer by tapping the icon labeled "Access settings." For example, you can specify whether you want to send the file at its original size or create and send a lower-resolution copy. (The copy is stored only on your smart device, not on the camera.) Where the image files end up depends on how you have picture storage set up on your device. Look for the Camera Connect app in your device's main settings panel to sort this out. You may need to give the app permission to access the photo-storage folder on the device. For NFC transfer, look for the camera's NFC thing-a-ma-jingy on the left side of the camera, just forward of the door that covers the connection ports. Bring the device's NFC antenna into contact with that mark until a message on the camera monitor says that the connection is established. Then move the two devices apart. At that point, the Camera Connect icon should launch automatically on the device. While a Wi-Fi connection is active, the lamp labeled on the right side lights. You can't access any camera functions by using the camera's own controls while the devices are connected.

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How to Give the Canon Rebel T6/1300D a Wi-Fi Name

Article / Updated 11-14-2016

If you hope to transfer your pictures using a Wi-Fi connection, you will first need to give your Rebel T6/1300D a Wi-Fi name. To assign a name to the camera, take these steps: Open Setup Menu 3 and choose Wi-Fi/NFC. Press Set.On the screen that appears, highlight Enable. After you do so, the camera displays a check box related to NFC Connectivity. NFC stands for Near Field Communication. If your smartphone or other smart device is NFC capable, you may be able to establish a connection between it and the camera simply by placing the two devices next to each other. Some devices offer NFC only for limited functions, such as using Apple Pay on an iPhone. Anyway, if your device doesn't offer NFC, press the DISP button to remove the check mark from the NFC box. Press again to enable the option. Press the Set button. You see a screen asking you to enter a nickname for the camera. Select OK to display a keyboard input screen. The screen is divided into two sections: the text box, which shows the current nickname, and the keyboard, which you use to enter new characters. In the text box, the yellow line indicates the text cursor. Enter a camera nickname. This name will identify your camera on your smart device. By default, the camera name is EOST6. If that's okay with you, you don't have to change the name; just skip to step 5. If you do want to create a custom name, the keyboard screen works like so: Press the Q button to toggle between the text entry box and the keyboard. The blue outline indicates which part of the screen is active. In the image above, the keyboard is active, as it is when you first open the screen. To delete the default nickname: First, press the Q button to activate the text box. Press the right cross key to move the cursor to the end of the text. Then press the Erase button; each press deletes one character. To enter new text: Again, press Q to toggle to the keyboard if needed. Then use the cross keys or Main dial to highlight a character. To enter the character, press Set. If you make a mistake, press Q to switch back to the text box, move the cursor as needed, and press the Erase button to remove the offending character. To enter an empty space, choose the very first character on the keyboard. Your camera nickname can be up to 10 characters long. Press the Menu button. You see a confirmation screen; select OK to move forward and exit to Setup Menu 3. The camera is now ready for Wi-Fi connection.

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How to Read an RGB Histogram on Your Canon EOS Rebel T6/1300D

Article / Updated 11-14-2016

In Histogram display mode, you see two histograms on your Rebel T6/1300D: the Brightness histogram and an RGB histogram. The RGB histogram can be helpful in discovering problems with color saturation. To make sense of an RGB histogram, you first need to know that digital images are known as RGB images because they’re created from three primary colors of light: red, green, and blue. In the image file, the brightness values for those colors are contained in three separate vats of color data, known as color channels. Whereas the Brightness histogram reflects the brightness of all three color channels rolled into one, RGB histograms let you view the values for each individual channel. When you look at the brightness data for a single channel, though, you glean information about color saturation rather than image brightness. The short story is that when you mix red, green, and blue light, and each component is at maximum brightness, you create white. Zero brightness in all three channels creates black. If you have maximum red and no blue or green, though, you have fully saturated red. If you mix two channels at maximum brightness, you also create full saturation. For example, maximum red and blue produce fully saturated magenta. And, wherever colors are fully saturated, you can lose picture detail. For example, a rose petal that should have a range of tones from medium to dark red may instead be a flat blob of dark red. The upshot is that if all the pixels for one or two channels are slammed to the right end of the histogram, you may be losing picture detail because of overly saturated colors. If all three channels show a heavy pixel population at the right end of the histograms, you may have blown highlights — again, because the maximum levels of red, green, and blue create white. Either way, you may want to adjust the exposure settings and try again. A savvy RGB-histogram reader can also spot color balance issues by looking at the pixel values. But frankly, color balance problems are fairly easy to notice just by looking at the image on the camera monitor. If you’re a fan of RGB histograms, however, you may be interested in another possibility: You can swap the standard Brightness histogram that appears in Shooting Information playback mode with the RGB histogram. Just set the Histogram Disp option on Playback Menu 2 to RGB instead of Brightness.

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Interpreting a Brightness Histogram on Your Canon EOS Rebel T6/1300D

Article / Updated 11-14-2016

A brightness histogram on your Rebel T6/1300D is helpful for indicating tonal range. One of the most difficult problems to correct in a photo editing program is known as blown highlights or clipped highlights. Both terms mean that the brightest areas of the image are so overexposed that areas that should include a variety of light shades are instead totally white. For example, in a cloud image, pixels that should be light to very light gray are white, resulting in a loss of detail in those clouds. In Shooting Information and Histogram display modes, areas that fall into this category blink in the image thumbnail. This warning is a helpful feature because simply viewing the image on the camera monitor isn’t always a reliable way to gauge exposure: The brightness of the monitor and the ambient light in which you view it affect the appearance of the image. The Brightness histogram, found in both display modes, offers another analysis of image exposure. This graph indicates the distribution of shadows, highlights, and midtones (areas of medium brightness) in an image. Photographers use the term tonal range to describe this aspect of their pictures. The horizontal axis of the graph represents the possible picture brightness values, from black (a value of 0) to white (a value of 255). And the vertical axis shows you how many pixels fall at a particular brightness value. A spike indicates a heavy concentration of pixels. Keep in mind that there is no “perfect” histogram that you should try to duplicate. Instead, interpret the histogram with respect to the amount of shadows, highlights, and midtones that make up your subject. For example, the photographer was seeking to create a slightly dark, moody look in a candle image. And it was challenging not to blow out the details in the white gardenia bloom. So the Exposure Compensation value was set to EV –1.0, forcing the camera to deliver an exposure that was one stop darker than it normally would have produced. So the histogram reflects that exposure. The fact that the white end of the scale didn't show a heavy cluster of pixels was a good indication that the white flower details were not overexposed — something that's often difficult to judge by simply looking at the image on the camera monitor. Although there were a few "blinkies" in the candle flame (indicating fully white pixels), there were none in the gardenia, which was further help in deciding the right exposure settings.

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