GED Mathematical Reasoning Test For Dummies book cover

GED Mathematical Reasoning Test For Dummies

By: Murray Shukyn and Achim K. Krull Published: 09-28-2015

Gear up to crush the GED Mathematical Test

Does the thought of taking the GED Mathematical Reasoning Test make you weak? Fear not! With the help of GED Mathematical Reasoning Test For Dummies, you'll get up to speed on the new structure and computer-based format of the GED and gain the confidence and know-how to make the Mathematical Reasoning Test your minion. Packed with helpful guidance and instruction, this hands-on test-prep guide covers the concepts covered on the GED Mathematical Reasoning Test and gives you ample practice opportunities to assess your understanding of number operations/number sense, measurement and geometry, data, statistics, and probability, and algebra, functions, and patterns.

Now a grueling 115 minutes long, the new Mathematical Reasoning section of the GED includes multiple choice, fill-in-the-blank, hot-spot, drop-down, and drag-and-drop questions—which can prove to be quite intimidating for the uninitiated. Luckily, this fun and accessible guide breaks down each section of the exam and the types of questions you'll encounter into easily digestible parts, making everything you'll come across on exam day feel like a breeze! Inside, you'll find methods to sharpen your math skills, tips on how to approach GED Mathematical Reasoning question types and formats, practice questions and study exercises, and a full-length practice test to help you pinpoint where you need more study help.

  • Presents reviews of the GED Mathematical Reasoning test question types and basic computer skills
  • Offers practice questions assessing work-place related and academic-based math skills
  • Includes one full-length GED Mathematical Reasoning practice test
  • Provides scoring guidelines and detailed answer explanations

Even if math has always made you mad, GED Mathematical Reasoning Test For Dummies makes it easy to pass this crucial exam and obtain your hard-earned graduate equivalency diploma.

Articles From GED Mathematical Reasoning Test For Dummies

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32 results
32 results
GED Math Practice Questions: Factors and Multiples

Article / Updated 02-09-2017

You may encounter one or more questions on the GED Mathematical Reasoning test where you have to factor or determine multiples of two or more numbers. These questions aren't likely to ask you so directly to factor a number or determine its multiples. In fact, they may not even mention factors or multiples—you'll simply need to recognize them. Practice questions Simplify the expression, leaving the answer in radical form: ___________ Every 3 days, we feed our anaconda. Every 14 days, we clean his cage. Today, we cleaned his cage and fed him. How many days from today will we feed him and clean his cage on the same day? A.28 B.42 C.26 D.35 Answers and explanations The simplified expression is To multiply square roots, you multiply the numbers inside the radicals and then simplify, but because these two numbers have obvious common factors, factoring the numbers before multiplying simplifies the process: 42 You can find the answer in either of two ways: Write the multiples of each number and find the first match: 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 18, 21, 24, 27, 30, 33, 36, 39, 42 14, 28, 42 Factor the numbers and multiply each factor by the greatest number of times it occurs in either number:

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GED Math Practice Questions: Computing with Rational Expressions

Article / Updated 02-08-2017

In the Mathematical Reasoning section of the GED, you may have to perform some computations with rational expressions. The following example questions ask you to subtract and multiply numeric fractions. Practice questions Subtract the following rational expressions: Multiply the following rational expressions: Answers and explanations The result is Start by factoring the denominator in both rational expressions: Multiply the first expression by and the second fraction by and you have: The result is Here's how you find it:

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GED Math Practice Questions: Solving Word Problems

Article / Updated 02-08-2017

Before you can answer a Mathematical Reasoning problem on the GED, you need to convert the problem into a mathematical equation. (Or at least you have to figure out what the question is asking you to do in terms of mathematics.) Of course, that's only the first step: being a word problem, it typically requires you to perform additional steps to arrive at the answer. When you encounter a word problem on the GED Math test (and most are word problems), remember the three Ds — Decipher, Decide, and Do: Decipher — Read the problem and the answers carefully and write down what you know and need to figure out. Decide — Figure out what you need to do or what steps you need to take to find the answer. Do — Do the math and identify the correct answer. Practice questions Alvin is always lost because he has no sense of direction and pays no attention to where he is going. After class on Tuesday, Alvin's buddy invites him over to prepare for the science test the next morning. He tells Alvin to walk 3 blocks north and 4 blocks west after he leaves the bus and look for 388 on a red brick house. When Alvin leaves the bus, he walks 3 blocks south and 4 blocks west. Realizing he is completely lost, he starts asking passers-by for directions to the bus stop, hoping he can find his friend's house from there. A good-hearted elderly man walks him the 3 blocks north and 4 blocks east to get back to the bus stop. He then walks Alvin to his friend's house and leaves Alvin with a comment that Alvin makes him feel young again. How many extra blocks did Alvin walk? A. 7 B. 14 C. 3 D. 21 Pedro works in sales. He compares his commissions for the four-week period when bonuses were being given and finds that he has earned an average of $424.50 per week for the four weeks. He earned $485.00 the first week, $257.00 the second week, $410.00 the third week, and $546.00 the final week. Pedro's company offered sales staff an incentive bonus of 15% for each week their commissions exceeded $475.00. How much did he earn in dollars that four-week period, including commissions and bonuses? Answers and explanations B. 14 blocks. This is a good place for a quick sketch: Assuming the streets run parallel, Alvin would have traveled 3 + 4 + 3 + 4 + 3 + 4 = 21 blocks instead of the 7 blocks he would have had to travel. He traveled 14 extra blocks. $1,852.65. Pedro earned $485.00 the first week, $257.00 the second week, $410.00 the third week, and $546.00 the fourth week. If the bonus is paid for weeks when his commissions exceeded $475.00, he would have earned bonuses for the first and fourth week. His bonus the first week is ($485.00) (0.15) = $72.75 and the fourth week is ($546.00) (0.15) = $81.90. His earnings for the four-week period = $485.00 + $257.00 + $410.00 + $546.00 + $72.75 + $81.90 = $1,852.65.

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10 Tips for Solving GED Mathematical Reasoning Problems and Checking Your Answers

Article / Updated 02-08-2017

When you’re taking the GED Mathematical Reasoning test (or any of the GED tests for that matter), you have to battle the clock. Following are ten helpful tips to save time and make sure the answers you arrive at are the correct ones. Get real: Try to develop a sixth sense about the real world around you. Cars don’t get 160 miles per gallon, unless they’re rolling downhill, so if your answer is out of whack with reality, it’s probably wrong. Unless your test was written by an evil genius, the real-life questions should have some relationship to real life as you know it. If you come up with an answer that seems odd, check to see whether you used the correct conversion. For example, if a 10-x-15-foot room has a 120-foot ceiling, you may have mistakenly converted feet to inches. Go with the easiest conversion: As you read the question, pay close attention to the units of measure. The units in the question should be uniform and related to the units required for the answer. If all the units are in feet and the question asks for an answer in inches, you know that you have to convert feet to inches. But what do you do if some of the answer choices are in feet and others are in inches? If you have to convert units, choose the unit with the least chance of producing an error and the best chance of estimating the answer. If a room measures 13-x-7 yards and the answer is in feet, these numbers are easy to multiply by 3 in your head. If the room is 12.48 yards long, you would be better off using a calculator and converting at the end. Whole numbers are easier to work with than fractions or decimals. Multiply by hundreds, tens, and ones: When multiplying a large number by a small one (single- or double-digit number), break the large number down into its component parts, multiply the parts by the smaller number, and add the results, as in the following example: 89 × 9 = (80 × 9) + (9 × 9) = 720 + 81 = 801 Round and estimate: If the answer choices you have to select from differ greatly in magnitude, you may be able to choose the correct answer without having to calculate the exact answer. When you get a question involving addition or subtraction, estimate the numbers to the nearest 5 or 10 and do the math in your head. Adding numbers that end in 5 or 0 is easier than adding numbers that end in 3 or 7, for example. If the question specifies a maximum value, round everything up to quickly determine whether the total is less than the maximum value, as in this example: Mary is doing some quick shopping and doesn’t want to spend more than $20.00. She buys some apples for $5.73, some grapes for $4.77, and lipstick for $6.73, plus 8% tax. Did she stay within her budget? Round all values up to the nearest dollar and you see that $6 + $5 + $7 = $18. If tax is 8%, round it up to 10%, and you quickly see that the tax on $18 would be $1.80. $18 + $1.80 = $19.80, which is still less than $20, so you know that Mary stayed within her budget. If the question specifies a minimum value, round all other values down first and then perform your calculations. Skip and come back to impossibly hard questions: Keep in mind that many mathematicians are lazy people who try to solve problems the easiest way possible. If a question is becoming impossibly difficult to solve, something is usually wrong. Check over your work and make sure that you have copied all numbers correctly and that you didn’t use the wrong operation in working through the problem. Simplify before doing the math: Before you even think about multiplying or dividing fractions or performing any series of mathematical operations, consider whether you can simplify the equation before doing the math. By simplifying, you end up with fewer and smaller numbers and may even be able to do the math in your head, saving yourself precious minutes on the test. For example, without simplifying, but if you simplify, Subtract the discount percentage from one: If the problem offers you a discount of 15% from the regular price, you can either multiply the regular price by 0.15 to calculate the discount and subtract that amount from the regular price, or you can figure that if you’re getting a 15% discount, you’re paying 85% of the regular price, because 100% – 15% = 85%. Instead of doing the problem in two steps, you do it in one and save yourself a few seconds: multiply the amount by 0.85 to get the same results in one step. You also reduce your chances of making a mistake; the more steps you take, the more chances you have of making a mistake, especially when you’re in a hurry. Estimate fractions as zero, half, or one: When working with fractions that are less than one, ask yourself whether the fraction is closer to zero, half, or one, and then estimate your answer. Here are a couple examples: Because both fractions are close to the answer is close to 1. Because the fraction is just over the answer is likely to be slightly more than half of 17, or slightly more than 8.5. Add the tax or tip percentage to one: When calculating tax or tip on a total, you can calculate the tax or tip and add it to the total (two steps) or add the tax or tip percentage to 100% and multiply that by the total (one step). For example, to leave your server a 15% tip in a restaurant, you can multiply the amount on the check by 0.15 and add this to the bill to get the amount you should leave the server in total. Or you can multiply the check by 1.15 to calculate the total plus tip (100% total plus 15% tip is 115%, or 1.15). Again, fewer steps and fewer chances for error, especially if you use mental math. Draw cards and roll dice: Many probability problems involve cards and dice, so know that a standard deck has 52 cards, 4 suits (diamonds, hearts, clubs, and spades), and 13 cards in each suit: ace, 2–10, jack, queen, and king. If you want to know your chances of drawing an ace of hearts from a full deck of cards, you know that a full deck has 52 cards and only 1 ace of hearts, so your chances are 1 in 52 of drawing an ace of hearts. If you’re happy to just draw any ace, then the deck still has 52 cards, but 4 aces, so your chances of drawing an ace are 4 in 52, or 2 in 26, or 1 in 13. Dice questions are also common on the test. Keep in mind that every die (singular for “dice”) has 6 faces, numbered 1 to 6. Every time you roll a die, you have a 1 in 6 chance that it’ll land with a certain number facing up.

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GED Math Practice Questions: Volume and Surface Area

Article / Updated 02-08-2017

The GED Mathematical Reasoning test is likely to ask a few questions that involve volume and surface area. When taking the computer version of the test, a formula sheet is supplied, but you will have to know how to apply these formulas. The following sample questions ask you to find the diameter of a can based on its volume and height, and the slant length of a pyramid, given its side length and surface area. Practice questions If a can is designed to contain 24 cubic inches of coconut water and has to be 6 inches tall to fit on the shelves in a store, what would be its diameter in inches? A. 1.72 B. 1.27 C. 1.79 D. 2.26 A pyramid has a square base with one of its sides being 3 feet long and a total surface area of 39 square feet. What is the slant length of one of its sides? Answers and explanations D. The can would be 2.26 inches in diameter. Substituting in the formula for the volume of a right cylinder divide both sides by 6 to simplify 5 feet To answer this question, use the surface area formula for a pyramid, and plug in the values you have: The area of the base is the perimeter is and the surface area is 39 square feet, so you have Do the math:

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GED Mathematical Reasoning Practice Questions: Squares, Roots, and Cubes

Article / Updated 02-07-2017

On the Mathematical Reasoning section of the GED, certain problems require that you know how to determine a value's square or square root, or its cube or cube root. You're not likely to encounter problems that only involve squares and cubes. Instead, they'll appear as word problems, as in the following examples. Practice questions George is framing several square pictures, two of which measure 8 inches by 8 inches and the third of which measures 7 inches by 7 inches. How many square inches of glass would he need to exactly cover the pictures before putting them in frames? A. 128 B. 177 C. 49 D. 113 A cubic box holds 4,320 jelly beans. If there are 20 jelly beans per cubic centimeter, what is the length of one side of the box? E. 5.0 F. 5.5 G. 6.0 H. 6.5 Answers and explanations B. Two of the pictures measure 8 inches by 8 inches, so they would require square inches of glass. The third one would require square inches of glass. In total, George would need 128 + 49 = 177 square inches of glass. G. First divide the total number of jelly beans in the box by 20 jelly beans per cubic centimeter to determine the volume of the box in cubic centimeters, which comes to 216. One side of the cube is Choice (G) is the correct answer.

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GED Math Practice Questions: Absolute Values

Article / Updated 04-05-2016

You may encounter one or two problems on the GED Mathematical Reasoning test that involve absolute values. The problem probably won't mention the term "absolute value," but the answer choices may bracket values or expressions between vertical lines, indicating that the value is an absolute. Here are some examples. Practice questions An assembly line packages 16-ounce boxes of cereal with a tolerance of plus or minus 1/2 ounce. Boxes not within the tolerance are discarded. Which of the following inequalities can be used to determine whether boxes of cereal are discarded? Leslie's checking account balance is $150. She writes checks for a pair of boots costing $120 and an outfit costing $45. How much money must she deposit into her checking account to bring the balance up to $25? Answers and explanations D. The weight of the box minus the ideal box weight must be within or it is discarded. You can plug in 16.6 and 15.4 to check. $40 Solving this problem is easy because it requires only addition and subtraction, as long as you don't get confused by the negative number. Leslie buys $165 in merchandise but has only $150 in her account. Unless she deposits more money, the account balance will be –$15. To bring the balance up to $25, she needs to deposit $25 + |–$15| = $40. Or you can think of it this way: Leslie needs to deposit $15 to bring the balance to zero, plus another $25 for a total of $40.

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GED Mathematical Reasoning Test For Dummies Cheat Sheet

Cheat Sheet / Updated 03-27-2016

To perform well on the GED Mathematical Reasoning test, you need to be able to perform basic mathematical operations; solve math problems (including word problems); interpret charts, tables, and graphs; calculate the perimeter, area, and volume of shapes and objects; and analyze data. This Cheat Sheet provides a more detailed list of what you need to know to perform well on the GED Mathematical Reasoning test and provides tips and tricks to help you answer questions faster and with greater accuracy.

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Recognizing the Skills Required to Pass the GED Mathematical Reasoning Test

Article / Updated 03-26-2016

Uncertainty can generate significant test anxiety. To lessen the anxiety and boost your performance on the GED Mathematical Reasoning test, get a general idea of what’s covered on the test. To do well on the test, you need to be able to do the following: Perform basic mathematical operations, including: addition, subtraction, multiplication, division, finding the square and square roots of numbers, and finding the cube and cube roots of numbers. Perform mathematical operations with fractions, decimals, and percentages. Recognize number patterns and determine the missing number in a given pattern. Read and understand word problems and translate them into mathematical operations that can be solved. Read and extract data from various types of graphs, including bar and column graphs, pie charts, and line graphs from diagrams and tables. Apply mathematical concepts to real-world situations, such as calculating the interest on a loan or the rate of speed required to reach a certain destination at a specific time. Calculate the perimeter and area of two-dimensional objects and the surface area and volume of three-dimensional objects when provided with formulas to perform the calculations. Use the Pythagorean theorem to calculate the length of one side of a right triangle when given the lengths of the other two sides. Determine the mean, median, and mode of a group of numbers. Solve linear equations that describe the slope of a line drawn on the coordinate plane. Calculate the probability of one or more random events occurring, such as rolling a certain number on a six-sided die. Solve for unknown variables when given the values of the other variables in an equation.

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GED Mathematical Reasoning Test: Using the On-Screen Calculator

Article / Updated 03-26-2016

When you take the computer version of the GED Mathematical Reasoning test, you have access to an on-screen calculator for all but the first five questions. You may not need it for some questions. In fact, if you can do the math in your head, you can save yourself some precious time. However, when the math is complicated or you want to double-check your computations, you can click the Calculator button in the upper left corner of the screen to access the calculator, which is an on-screen version of the TI-30XS MultiView hand-held calculator shown here. Credit: Images used with permission by Texas Instruments, Inc. Finally, you’d have to add 33 to 9 to get 44. If you’re accustomed to using a typical hand-held calculator, we strongly encourage you to get oriented to the TI-30XS so you don’t have to transition to it on test day. This primer will help. Using the arrow keys One of the biggest adjustments you need to make when transitioning from a typical calculator to the TI-30XS is that you may need to use the arrows in the upper-right portion of the keypad to move up or down in a fraction or to move outside of certain operators. Clearing the display Before entering an equation, click to clear the display. Otherwise, previous values stored in memory may be added to what you enter, leading to a wrong answer. Performing basic operations To perform addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division, simply key in the numbers and operators in the order in which you want them performed and click to display the answer. Remember the order of operations: Parentheses, Exponents, Multiplication, Division, Addition, and Subtraction, or PEMDAS for short. The order in which operations are performed is always important. Perform operations in the wrong order and you may get the wrong answer. Use the parentheses keys to group operations that need to be performed first. Deleting typos If you make a mistake while entering an equation, click the left arrow key to move the cursor over the error and click Using the 2nd key In the upper-left corner of the keypad is a green key labeled Note that many of the keys on the keypad have two functions. The white label on the key itself indicates the key’s primary function. The green label above the key indicates its secondary function. To activate the key’s primary function, simply click the key. Calculating percentages Entering numbers in scientific notation Raising a number to a certain power Click only when you’re ready to have the calculator solve the equation you entered. Keying in square roots and other roots To enter a square root, click and key in the number. If the square root is part of a longer equation, click the right arrow key to move out from under the radical sign before entering the next operator or value. To calculate the square root you keyed in, click Keying in fractions Keying in mixed numbers Toggling the answer display Storing and recalling values You may have a need to store a value and recall it later for use in another calculation. Note: Some people prefer to use a real calculator. You may bring this calculator to the test if you prefer. That allows you to practice ahead of time. However, be sure to check with the GED Testing Service to confirm which calculator(s) they currently allow.

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