Paleo Cookbook For Dummies book cover

Paleo Cookbook For Dummies

By: Kellyann Petrucci Published: 07-29-2013

The fast and easy way to enjoy a Paleo diet

The Paleo movement is one of the hottest diet and healthy-eating approaches, as people discover an appealing and sustainable alternative to the restrictive diets that lead to burnout and failed weight loss efforts. This modern-day take on an ancient diet—which excludes dairy, processed foods, and refined sugar—has helped thousands of people lose weight and keep it off. Now, The Paleo Cookbook For Dummies offers more than 100 simple and tasty Paleo recipes for breakfast, lunch, dinner, snacks, desserts, and even beverages.

  • Includes an overview of the Paleo Diet, grocery shopping and pantry stocking tips, and kid-friendly Paleo recipes
  • Offers Paleo recipes for every meal of the day
  • All recipes are contributed by powerhouse Paleo chefs

The Paleo Cookbook For Dummies gives you delicious, flavorful, and easy-to-make recipes for anyone who wants to enjoy the benefits of eating the Paleo way.

Articles From Paleo Cookbook For Dummies

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Paleo Cookbook For Dummies Cheat Sheet

Cheat Sheet / Updated 03-27-2016

If you love results, then cooking Paleo is for you. Eating Paleo boils down to one simple philosophy: eating real, fresh foods your body is designed to have. Making this lifestyle change work means getting into the kitchen — cooking quality foods, swapping out non-Paleo ingredients, using oils and spices to your best advantage, and revamping your view of snacks.

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9 Paleo Foods to Please Your Palate

Step by Step / Updated 03-27-2016

Concerned that eating Paleo-style will become boring? No worries! Paleo foods are filled with texture and flavor — and these nine primal favorites are loaded with good stuff: vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants; Paleo-approved proteins; squeaky-clean carbs; and healthy fats. Plus, these flavorful foods have the nutrient density (lots of nutrients relative to their calories) to give your body the deep nutrition it craves.

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Paleo Diet Recipe: Make-Your-Own Cobb Salads

Article / Updated 03-26-2016

This variable recipe makes a terrific ready-ahead-of-time meal option for your Paleo diet. With your ingredients cooked and on stand-by in the fridge, you can set everything out and get chowing down in less than 10 minutes. Be sure to use bacon free of nitrates, casein, gluten, and antibiotics. Preparation time: 10 minutes Yield: 6 servings Paleo Ranch Dressing (see the following recipe) 3 heads romaine lettuce 3 chicken breasts, cooked and chopped 12 strips bacon, cooked and chopped 12 hard-boiled eggs, chopped 2 cups sliced fresh peppers 2 cups shredded carrots 1 cup nuts of choice (except peanuts or soy nuts) Tear the romaine leaves into bite-sized pieces. Set out all the prepared ingredients, including 1 cup of Paleo Ranch Dressing. Allow everyone to assemble their salads and top with the dressing. Paleo Ranch Dressing 1 egg, room temperature 1 cup macadamia or avocado oil, room temperature 2 teaspoons dried dill 1 teaspoon garlic powder 1 teaspoon onion powder 1/2 teaspoon sea salt 1/4 teaspoon chili powder 1/4 teaspoon ground black or white pepper 2 tablespoons vinegar of choice 1-1/2 teaspoons hot sauce 1 teaspoon honey 1 teaspoon yellow mustard Crack the egg into the bowl of a blender or food processor. Run it on medium speed, enough to whip the egg into a uniform mixture. Turn the appliance onto high speed and very slowly and steadily drizzle in the oil (this process should take a few minutes). After you’ve achieved a nice, thick mayo base, lower the speed to medium and add the remaining ingredients. If you want to be conservative, add a little of each at a time to suit your tastes. Store the dressing in an airtight glass jar in the fridge and consume within a few days. Per serving: Calories 669 (From Fat 477); Fat 53g (Saturated 9g); Cholesterol 436mg; Sodium 433mg; Carbohydrate 16g (Dietary Fiber 6g); Protein 34g. Vary It! Mix up your proteins and fresh veggies. Try leftover steak and fresh cucumber. If you like, add a fermented veggie like kimchi or sauerkraut to punch the zing factor even more. Omit the vinegar for thicker dressing that makes a good dip, or omit the chili powder and hot sauce if you don’t want the spicy heat. If you prefer a thinner dressing, you can adjust by adding some extra vinegar to the dressing. You can also vary the flavor by substituting curry paste (for tasty heat), fish sauce (for savory), or tamari and/or coconut aminos (for even more savory). Recipe courtesy of Audrey Olson, author of Primal Kitchen: A Family Grokumentary

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Paleo Diet Recipe: Dilly Chili Roasted King Salmon

Article / Updated 03-26-2016

Salmon and summertime are a sure-fire match for enjoying fresh ingredients in your Paleo diet dining. This roasted salmon recipe is quick and easy, giving you more time for conversation across the picnic table! Preparation time: 15 minutes Cooking time: 25 minutes Yield: 8 servings 2 tablespoons olive oil, plus more for the foil Kosher salt and black pepper 1-1/2-pound salmon fillet, skin-on 1/2 a lemon, sliced 5 sprigs fresh dill 2 tablespoons capers 1/2 tablespoon chili powder 1/2 tablespoon garlic powder Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. Lay out a piece of aluminum foil 2-1/2 times the length of your salmon fillet. Drizzle the foil with olive oil and add a sprinkling of salt and pepper. Place the salmon fillet, skin-side-down, on top of the seasoned foil. Season the top of the salmon with more salt and pepper, the chili powder, and the garlic. Pour the 2 tablespoons of olive oil over the spices and rub it into skin to coat the entire top of the fillet. Top with the lemon slices, fresh dill, and capers. Fold the foil over the salmon and seal well on the three non-folded sides. Try to make the package airtight. Place on a roasting pan or on your grill and cook at 375 degrees for 25 minutes or until the salmon reaches an internal temperature of 120 degrees. Remove from the oven/grill and share with your friends. Per serving: Calories 115 (From Fat 38); Fat 4g (Saturated 0.5g); Cholesterol 30mg; Sodium 192mg; Carbohydrate 1.5g (Dietary Fiber 0.5g); Protein 18g. Recipe courtesy Nick Massie, chef and author of Paleo Nick This recipe has been vetted by the team at Whole9 and is considered acceptable for a 30-Day Reset Paleo cleanse.

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Paleo Diet Recipe: Niçoise-ish Salad

Article / Updated 03-26-2016

If you're in the mood for a summery salad that fits within your Paleo diet, the Niçoise-ish is a delight just waiting to be assembled and served. The mix of ingredients lends a beautiful balance of color and flavor. Your investment in high-quality (higher priced) tuna will pay off with the first taste — and every bite after. Preparation time: 25 minutes Cooking time: 2 minutes Yield: 4 servings 2 cups chopped purple cauliflower 2 cups chopped asparagus, trimmed 1/3 cup extra-virgin olive oil 1/4 cup white balsamic vinegar 1 clove garlic, crushed 1/2 teaspoon stone-ground mustard Salt and pepper to taste 1 head romaine lettuce, chopped 1 large carrot, peeled and thinly sliced 1 cup sliced bell peppers 1/2 a small red onion, thinly sliced 1-1/2 cups cherry tomatoes 1 avocado, peeled, pitted, and diced Four 5-ounce cans wild-caught tuna in water 3 hardboiled eggs, shelled and quartered To blanch the cauliflower and asparagus, bring a large pot of water to a boil. Add the cauliflower and asparagus and let them boil for approximately 2 minutes, until they’re just tender. Drain them in a colander and run under cold water to stop the cooking. In a medium bowl, whisk together the olive oil, vinegar, garlic, and mustard. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Toss the remaining ingredients in a bowl and drizzle with the garlic vinaigrette. Per serving: Calories 564 (From Fat 290); Fat 32g (Saturated 6g); Cholesterol 199mg; Sodium 636mg; Carbohydrate 26g (Dietary Fiber 9g); Protein 44g. Recipe courtesy Arsy Vartanian, author of Rubies & Radishes This recipe has been vetted by the team at Whole9 and is considered acceptable for a 30-Day Reset Paleo cleanse.

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Paleo Diet Recipe: Macadamia Nut Chocolate Chip Cookies

Article / Updated 03-26-2016

Nuts are a key part of your Paleo diet, so why not mix up a batch of fresh-baked cookies that marries macadamia tree seeds with Paleo-approved chocolate chips and unsweetened coconut. These cookies will largely retain whatever shape you put them in before baking, so shape them as desired. Preparation time: 10 minutes Cooking time: 14 minutes Yield: 16 servings 1/2 cup honey 1/2 cup coconut oil, melted 4 eggs 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract 1/8 teaspoon sea salt 1 cup coconut flour 1/2 cup macadamia nuts, ground 1/2 cup shredded unsweetened coconut 3/4 cup Paleo-approved chocolate chips Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Microwave the honey and coconut oil in a microwave-safe bowl for up to 1 minute on a medium power to melt them together. Add the honey mixture to a large bowl with the eggs, vanilla, and salt and mix well with a hand mixer or stand mixer. Add the coconut flour and mix well. Stir in the macadamia nuts, shredded coconut, and chocolate chips by hand. Drop heaping tablespoons of cookie batter onto the baking sheet. Bake for 14 minutes or until golden brown. Remove from the oven and let the cookies remain on the pan for 1 minute before transferring them to wire racks to cool. Per serving: Calories 189 (From Fat 126); Fat 14g (Saturated 9g); Cholesterol 47mg; Sodium 32mg; Carbohydrate 16g (Dietary Fiber 4g); Protein 3g. If you aren’t sure where to find Paleo-approved chocolate chips, try the Enjoy Life brand. They’re dairy-, soy-, and nut-free. Recipe courtesy George Bryant, CEO and author of Civilized Caveman Cooking Creations

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Paleo Diet Recipe: Dilly Chili Roasted King Salmon

Article / Updated 03-26-2016

Salmon and summertime are a sure-fire match for enjoying fresh ingredients in your Paleo diet dining. This roasted salmon recipe is quick and easy, giving you more time for conversation across the picnic table! Preparation time: 15 minutes Cooking time: 25 minutes Yield: 8 servings 2 tablespoons olive oil, plus more for the foil Kosher salt and black pepper 1-1/2-pound salmon fillet, skin-on 1/2 a lemon, sliced 5 sprigs fresh dill 2 tablespoons capers 1/2 tablespoon chili powder 1/2 tablespoon garlic powder Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. Lay out a piece of aluminum foil 2-1/2 times the length of your salmon fillet. Drizzle the foil with olive oil and add a sprinkling of salt and pepper. Place the salmon fillet, skin-side-down, on top of the seasoned foil. Season the top of the salmon with more salt and pepper, the chili powder, and the garlic. Pour the 2 tablespoons of olive oil over the spices and rub it into skin to coat the entire top of the fillet. Top with the lemon slices, fresh dill, and capers. Fold the foil over the salmon and seal well on the three non-folded sides. Try to make the package airtight. Place on a roasting pan or on your grill and cook at 375 degrees for 25 minutes or until the salmon reaches an internal temperature of 120 degrees. Remove from the oven/grill and share with your friends. Per serving: Calories 115 (From Fat 38); Fat 4g (Saturated 0.5g); Cholesterol 30mg; Sodium 192mg; Carbohydrate 1.5g (Dietary Fiber 0.5g); Protein 18g. Recipe courtesy Nick Massie, chef and author of Paleo Nick This recipe has been vetted by the team at Whole9 and is considered acceptable for a 30-Day Reset Paleo cleanse.

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10 Common Paleo Myths Busted

Article / Updated 03-26-2016

Lots of myths are floating around about Paleo. Even though eating Paleo is likely the healthiest diet on earth, people simply aren’t used to eating that way. Balking at good nutrition may seem silly, but like anything new and different, it takes time to become fully accepted. These ten myths reflect the most unknown principles of Paleo cooking and eating. I won’t get important nutrients eating Paleo. Paleo kicks the hinge off every other nutritional program for one reason: nutritional sufficiency. Paleo foods naturally hold deep nutrition, which is what people’s bodies crave. One of the main reasons for the pandemic of suffering in the modern world is that so many folks are nutrient-deficient. Paleo is the perfect remedy for this situation because it floods the body with vitamins, minerals, and essential fats. As the good stuff floods in, toxins flood out. Start redefining your idea of healthy eating. Grains, dairy, and beans are more damaging than rewarding and don’t add the value you need to your nutritional bank. Think about evolution when determining what you should and shouldn’t be eating. You can find more nutrition in grass-fed meats, healthy fats, vegetables, and fruit than anywhere else. Without dairy, I won’t get enough calcium. Yes, you need calcium to form healthy bones and teeth. However, you’re not locked into getting it from a cow. In fact, most people who consume dairy end up inflamed due to toxins and hormones given to the animals that produce the products. On the contrary, other sources of calcium (such as the following) work really well in the body and cause no inflammation whatsoever. Plant sources Kale Spinach Collard greens, mustard greens, and turnip greens Bok choy and cabbage Seaweed such as kelp and dulse Canned fish such as mackerel, salmon, and sardines (with bones is always better) Fat sources Nut butters Nuts (almonds, cashews, chestnuts, Brazil nuts) Dates Figs Olives You always have bone broths to fall back on, which are loaded with all vitamins and minerals — including calcium. Saturated fat?! I’ll develop heart disease. A meta-analysis published in February 2012 in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition pooled data from 21 unique studies that included almost 350,000 people, tracked for an average of 14 years. It concluded that no relationship exists between the intake of saturated fat and the incidence of heart disease or stroke. If you want to prevent heart disease, don’t consume cheap, tasteless vegetable oils like soybean oil, corn oil, canola oil, safflower oil, sunflower oil, and margarines or the packaged, processed foods made with them. Stick with Paleo-approved fats and oils, and you’ll not only prevent heart disease but also get healthier with every bite. I can never drink again. In a perfect world, no one drinks because alcohol is toxic to the liver, but as far as Paleo adherence goes, this category is one where you have to call the shots. You choose your shade of Paleo; if an occasional drink works in your program, it’s all yours. If you fall into these groups, you should avoid alcohol: Need a healing phase: If you have a condition that needs to be healed (such as autoimmune or digestive issues), give your body a chance to heal without all the toxins. Alcohol will worsen any condition that leaves your cells toxic. Need to lose some pounds: Your liver can’t help you with fat burning if it’s detoxing alcohol. Additionally, alcohol provides a lot of empty calories; much like sugar, it’s void of nutrients your body needs to be healthy. Tackling a 30-Day Reset: If you’re undergoing a Paleo cleanse, alcohol is definitely off the menu for that period. Stick with potato vodka, dry wines, rum, sparkling wine, and tequila. Stay away from grain-based alcohol like beer, bourbon, gin, and grain-based vodka, which will make you feel like you swallowed a bowling ball and are the worst gut wreckers out there. When you get a mixed drink, mind the sugars. Avoid juices, sodas, and tonic waters. Use soda water as the mixer and stick a lime in it to manage your body’s insulin response. Paleo food is weird. Some of the Paleo-approved organ meats and bone broths may seem weird, but they’re just new and different. Bone broth and organ meats have been used as medicine for longer than anyone alive has been on this earth. When you eat them, you’ll heal. Period. Most of the United States is in a pandemic of human suffering because of illness that the right diet could address; that seems stranger than eating liver and onions does. As far as the rest of the Paleo menu, lean meats, seafood, fresh vegetables and fruit, healthy fats, and nuts and seeds aren’t out of the box. It’s sad that processed, refined, sugary, packaged foods have become the common, everyday foods while back-to-nature-foods seem like crazy town. The food in a Paleo diet is too expensive. If you’re used to buying nutritionally void, supersized junk, then yes, Paleo will cost a little more. Just remember in the long run you’ll end up spending less on medical care if you stick with the healthy stuff. Here are five doable ways to cleave some cash off the bill: Make informed produce choices. Read up on the Environmental Working Group’s Dirty Dozen and Clean 15 (fruits and veggies most and least contaminated by pesticides, respectively). You can use this information to decide what produce is okay to buy conventional. Buy local. The produce usually costs less at farmers’ markets and local farms. Split a cow. Go in on a cow with friends or family members through a farm meat share program. It’s a great way to get high-quality meats at a lower cost. Buy in bulk. The big-box retailers are coming out with more high-quality foods. Bring home extra when you see a good deal. Stock up on sales. Buy the best cuts of meat you can find on sale and stock ’em up. It’s just too hard to change eating habits. Look at it this way: Yes, eating Paleo is definitely harder than pulling up to a drive-through window and ordering a fast food meal. But eating Paleo isn’t harder than dealing with a life-threatening condition or harder than watching someone you love heal from a chronic illness. It’s not harder than the pain so many feel every day with their aches, pains, digestive discomforts, and exhaustion. A great way to make Paleo life a little simpler is to order food from a Paleo food home delivery company like Living Paleo Foods. Services like this one scrutinize every single ingredient to make sure you get the best Paleo foods delivered right to your door. Paleo diets have too much protein. Protein toxicity is a real issue caused by the amount of protein in your diet and your ratio of protein to the carbs and fats in your diet. Eating too much protein can put stress on your kidneys and liver because they struggle to convert the protein into a useful form of energy. Paleo is not a high-protein diet. Eating a variety of proteins as a part of a well-balanced diet will keep you within a healthy range of protein. Nowhere in a well-planned Paleo diet do you find a recommendation to eat tons of protein all day; it’s simply not the Paleo way. Meat is the most basic prehistoric food, and if you eat it in balance with your other macronutrients (carbohydrate and fat) and eyeball a decent potion size, your body can handle it just fine. A healthy Paleo protein serving size is about the size of the palm of your hand, or 3 to 4 ounces for women and 5 to 6 ounces for men. I can’t eat all those eggs without increasing my cholesterol! There is an assumption that if you eat cholesterol, you raise your blood levels of cholesterol. But that misconception just isn’t accurate. In fact, the B vitamin choline found in eggs actually acts as a transporter of cholesterol, keeping it from entering the bloodstream. Unless you have an autoimmune issue that eggs may aggravate, you have no reason to limit your consumption of eggs; in fact, they provide you with better health and immunity than any daily supplement. One egg has 13 essential nutrients, all in the yolk. What’s important, though, is buying organic, pasture-raised eggs. Studies show that commercially raised eggs are higher in pro-inflammatory omega-6 fatty acids. Farmers’ markets are a great option to get pasture-raised eggs. Paleo is just another low-carb diet. Paleo is naturally lower in carbohydrates, as nutrient-dense foods often are by nature. Paleo focuses on nutrient density, balance, and food quality as well as discovering how to gain an awareness of how food affects your body. The focus isn’t and never has been on carbohydrates.

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Paleo Diet Recipe: Roasted Beet, Fennel, and Spinach Salad

Article / Updated 03-26-2016

Prepare a delicious Paleo-friendly salad that features a feathery member of the parsley family, fennel. When it's roasted, fennel's distinctive taste gets tamed, so you're in store for mild hints of the aromatic licorice flavor. Preparation time: 20 minutes Cooking time: 25 minutes Yield: 2 servings 4 small beets 1 medium fennel bulb Zest of half an orange Juice of half an orange 1/2 teaspoon Dijon mustard 1/2 teaspoon honey 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar 4 tablespoons olive oil, divided 3 slices bacon 4 to 5 ounces fresh baby spinach 1/4 cup walnuts, chopped Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Place the beets and fennel on a cookie sheet and roast for 20 to 25 minutes or until tender. In a small bowl, combine the orange zest, orange juice, mustard, honey, vinegar, and 2 tablespoons of the olive oil and mix well. Remove the roasted beets and fennel from the oven and remove the peels, which should slip easily off the roasted beets. Chop the beets, thinly slice the fennel, and toss in the remaining olive oil in a medium bowl. Fry the bacon over medium-low heat until crisp (about 4 minutes). Transfer it to several layers of paper towel to drain, blotting slightly. Chop the bacon into small pieces. To assemble the salad, lay down a bed of spinach and top with the roasted beets and fennel and the walnuts. Sprinkle with the bacon and drizzle with the orange vinaigrette. Zest the orange before you cut it for juicing. Per serving: Calories 564 (From Fat 290); Fat 32g (Saturated 6g); Cholesterol 199mg; Sodium 636mg; Carbohydrate 26g (Dietary Fiber 9g); Protein 44g. Recipe courtesy Arsy Vartanian, author of Rubies & Radishes This recipe has been vetted by the team at Whole9 and is considered acceptable for a 30-Day Reset Paleo cleanse.

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What Foods Don't Fit within Paleo Eating

Article / Updated 03-26-2016

As you consider what's included in a Paleo diet, you might encounter some roadblocks in your thinking about healthy eating. You may have been sold the bill of goods that some popular foods are good for you — that you should have them as part of your daily plate. The problem with a lot of these foods is what they’re doing behind the scenes in your gut. When you eat a food that contains a lot of antinutrients (substances that inhibit your ability to absorb nutrients), things can go amuck in your system, causing inflammation and other problems. Other foods, such as processed foods and certain sweeteners, are just too new for the human body to know what to do with from an evolutionary standpoint. Our bodies are simply not designed to eat these foods. This situation is not good for your cells and always spells trouble. Grains These foods are the reigning stars of antinutrients and are the cause of a lot of modern ailments. Grains supply you with energy (but no more energy than you can get from produce), but in return, they basically wreck your gut. Remember, your gut is the force behind your immunity and is responsible in large part for how you look and feel. Here are the grains you need to say your parting words to. Amaranth Quinoa Barley Rice Buckwheat Rye Bulgur Sorghum Corn Spelt Millet Teff Oats Wheat Legumes and beans Beans give you subpar protein, are rather starchy, and (most importantly) are super hard for most people to digest. What you do get from beans and legumes is fiber, but you can get just as much fiber from produce without all of the digestive hassle. Plus, fiber from produce floods your system with beneficial phytonutrients (plant nutrients). You can make an exception for certain legumes that are actually more pod than pea — snow peas, sugar snap peas, and green beans. Otherwise, restrict the following as much as possible. Broad beans Navy beans Garbanzo beans Peanuts and peanut butter Kidney beans Peas Lima beans Soybeans (tofu, tempeh, natto, soy sauce, miso, edamame, and soymilk) Mung beans White beans If you’re a vegetarian and eat no fish or eggs, you have to get some protein somewhere. In this case, you have to make an exception for beans. Choose lentils, black beans, pinto beans, and red beans because they have the lowest impact on blood sugar (and blood sugar spikes cause you to become unhealthy and overweight). If you buy canned beans, rinse them with water a couple of times before eating. If you’re preparing dried beans, soak them for at least 12 hours before cooking. Rinsing and soaking remove the starch (and salt, if canned) and reduce the gassiness that beans cause for many people. Bad fats If you’re worried about heart disease, fats are where you need to pay attention. Not so much to all the “avoid full-fat foods” nonsense but to the fact that damaged fats and oils cause inflammation. Inflammation is the precursor for heart disease. Make these fats dead to you. Canola oil Rice bran oil Corn oil Safflower oil Cotton/cottonseed oil Soybean oil Grapeseed oil Sunflower oil Palm kernel oil Trans fats Partially hydrogenated oil Vegetable shortening Peanut oil Soy Soy is incredibly mucus producing. Mucus isn’t what you want in your gut — or anywhere in your body, for that matter. Here are some hidden words for processed soy. Hydrolyzed vegetable protein Soy protein Lecithin Textured soy flour (TSF) Monoglyceride and diglyceride Textured vegetable protein (TVP) Protein isolate Vegetable oil Soya Vegetable fat Soy isolate Vegetable protein Be careful of frankenfoods (super-processed foods masquerading as “healthier” versions of common items). They’re the worst of the worst soy products. Soymilk Veggie chicken wings Tofu hot dogs Veggie loafs Veggie bacon Veggie patties or boxed veggie burgers Veggie chicken Veggie sausage links Sweeteners Essentially, all carbohydrates are sugar, even the healthy carbohydrates. The point is to control the added sugar found in sweeteners. Sugars can cause big problems such as insulin resistance, weight gain, inflammation, cancer, decreased good cholesterol, and increased bad cholesterol. Sweeteners are also highly addictive, whether you’re aware of it or not. If you do anything for yourself, try to reprogram your body to not reach for sugar or sugary carbohydrates. Go completely sugar free for 30 days without cheating. Thirty days lets you clean your body, get rid of weak, unhealthy cells, and build healthier cells for a stronger, more youthful body. Dial into these sweeteners and added sugars, so you know what to avoid. Agave Molasses Aspartame (NutraSweet or Equal) Raw sugar Brown sugar Rice syrup Coconut sugar/coconut palm sugar Sucralose (Splenda) Corn syrup Sugar cane High fructose corn syrup White sugar Maltodextrin All other packages, boxes, or packets of artificial sugars Processed foods Processed foods are damaging to your cells, so you need to say your goodbyes. Be cautious of any food in a package and by all means become label savvy. Here are sneaky food additives: Anything “hydrolyzed” Glutamate Artificial coloring Preservatives Artificial sweeteners Soy protein Emulsifiers Stabilizers Flavor enhancers Yeast extract Glazing agents Monsosodium glutamate (MSG) is the salt of the amino acid called glutamate. MSG is immediately absorbed in your bloodstream, spiking our glutamate levels and potentially causing headaches, irritability, or anxiousness. The best way to avoid MSG is to avoid processed foods. When you buy packaged foods, look out for these codenames for MSG. Anything hydrolyzed Magnesium glutamate Any hydrolyzed protein Natrium glutamate Autolyzed yeast Sodium caseinate Calcium caseinate Textured protein Calcium glutamate Yeast extract Gelatin Yeast food Monosodium glutamate Yeast nutrient Monosodium glutamate When you're reading a food label, five is the magic number. When you start getting past five or so ingredients, the rest are often preservatives, sugars, and other additives. Be careful of snacks, soft drinks, French fries, cured meats, candies, desserts, frozen foods, and fast foods where additives are frequently found.

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