Gluten-Free All-in-One For Dummies book cover

Gluten-Free All-in-One For Dummies

By: The Experts at Dummies Published: 05-26-2015

Everything you need to know about living a gluten-free lifestyle

As the prevalence of gluten-free dieting continues to grow—both from necessity and choice—more and more people are searching for a healthy way to cut gluten out of their lives. Gluten-Free All-In-One For Dummies culls a wealth of indispensable information from six popular For Dummies books, providing you with an all-encompassing, one-stop resource for living and eating gluten-free. From gluten-free cooking and baking to must-have information on celiac disease, this comprehensive and authoritative guide to all things gluten-free is the only reference you'll need as you navigate your way around a wheat, barley, and rye-filled world.

With nearly millions of households having at least one person who eats gluten-free foods, the need for a trusted and authoritative guide to living gluten-free has never been greater. Thankfully, Gluten-Free All-In-One For Dummies is here to offer expert guidance on making the switch to a life free of gluten.

  • Recognize the benefits of adopting a gluten-free lifestyle
  • Interpret food labels and stock a gluten-free kitchen
  • Cook delicious gluten-free recipes for every meal of the day
  • Make kid-friendly gluten-free meals, baked goods, and desserts

If you're a seasoned gluten-free eater or a newcomer to the diet, Gluten-Free All-In-One For Dummies is the perfect, all-inclusive guide to ditching the grains and living a healthier life.

Articles From Gluten-Free All-in-One For Dummies

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29 results
Gluten Free All-In-One For Dummies Cheat Sheet

Cheat Sheet / Updated 03-27-2016

There are a lot of good reasons to choose to eat gluten-free, and doing so isn’t as daunting as many people think. If you think you have celiac disease, you need to get tested before you take on a gluten-free diet, and if you decide that such a lifestyle is for you, know that with small changes often a whole new level of well-being arises.

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Go Gluten-Free and Satisfy Your Sweet Tooth with Fabulous Fruit

Article / Updated 03-26-2016

Humans do love their sweets. You don’t have to give up everything sweet to go gluten-free. If you give a baby a spoonful of ice cream and one of sour cream, you don’t need a team of researchers and a multimillion-dollar, placebo-controlled, double-blind study to figure out which one will make him smile and which will make him grimace. Sure, people need glucose — that’s the sugar that powers the body. But you can get enough of that from fruit, vegetables, and other foods. You also have the added benefit of getting vitamins, minerals, fiber, and antioxidants for far fewer calories than the “empty calories” you find in sugary foods. So satisfy your sweet tooth, but try to do it with foods that pack a nutritional punch. Here are some ideas: Chocolate hazelnut spread fruit dip: Warm up chocolate hazelnut spread a little and dip fresh fruit in it. Grapes and French cream: Combine about 1 cup fat-free sour cream, 1/2 cup powdered sugar, 1/2 cup sucralose artificial sweetener (Splenda), and a dash of vanilla. Mix the French cream with red, green, and black grapes. Peaches ’n cream: Put half of a peach or pear in a dish and add a small scoop of vanilla frozen yogurt. Put raspberries or strawberries on top. Pudding: If you use skim milk with a packaged pudding, it’s pretty good for you. Serve it with bananas on top. Strawberries and yogurt: Slice strawberries and blend them with nonfat flavored yogurt. Top the mixture with artificial sweetener if you want a little extra sweetness. Strawberry sweet and sour: Dip fresh strawberries into fat-free sour cream and then into artificial sweetener or honey. Fresh fruit is best for you when you store it properly. Don’t refrigerate bananas and other tropical fruits. Melons don’t need refrigeration until you cut them; store them in a separate bin, away from vegetables and meat.

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Simple Ways to Make a Recipe Gluten-Free

Article / Updated 03-26-2016

Although some recipes are easier to adjust than others, almost any recipe can be made gluten-free. The easiest to change are recipes with only small amounts of flour and fare with high fruit and vegetable content. But even if your gluten-heavy Italian recipe calls for wheat pasta, just use a gluten-free pasta instead. And if you’re clean out of gluten-free pasta, knowing you can substitute rice, potatoes, risotto, spaghetti squash, or polenta in the recipe can save the day! Omit ingredients. The first step in making a gluten-containing recipe gluten-free is to know which ingredients to avoid. While you search the ingredient list for items you can leave out, be sure to check the labels on ingredients you plan to use as well. Replace the flour. Converting recipes that don’t contain a large amount of flour is easiest. If the recipe calls for only a little flour, then just swap out the gluten-containing flour for cornstarch, arrowroot powder, or any gluten-free flour or flour blend. But if you’re preparing a recipe with more than just a few tablespoons of flour, you can’t throw in the same volume of gluten-free flour and have a recipe turn out well unless you use a blend. You can buy an all-purpose flour blend or make your own. Try 3 parts rice flour, 2 parts potato starch, 1 part tapioca flour, and 1 teaspoon of xanthan gum for every 1 1/2 cups of the flour mixture. Keep it together with xantham gum. Xanthan gum is a natural soluble fiber that’s produced by fermenting a microorganism with sugar. It helps give dough a sticky consistency, and dough minus gluten really needs some help to stay together! If you’re just mixing a little gluten-free flour into gravy or a soup or using it for a coating, then no gum is required. Add moisture to baked goods. Gluten-free flours tend to produce foods that are denser and drier than their gluten-containing cousins. Adding 1/4 cup applesauce, pumpkin puree, mayonnaise, or sour cream can improve the consistency. Use alternative breading options. If a recipe calls for a fried or baked crispy coating on meat or veggies, use ingredients like gluten-free breadcrumbs, gluten-free flours, ground nuts, cornmeal, crushed potato chips or corn chips, instant mashed potato flakes, or crushed gluten-free cereal or crackers. Reference gluten-free recipes. You don’t need to give up on favorite family recipes when you give up gluten! You just need to invent gluten-free versions. One way to figure out how to alter your recipe is to hunt for similar gluten-free recipes that have already been tried and published by someone else. If you want to make your grandma’s Spritz cookies, for example, there are certainly gluten-free cooks who have figured out similar cookie recipes. If you can’t find a gluten-free recipe for a specific dish, read through several recipes, looking for patterns that can help you alter your recipe. For example Do the similar recipes you find tend to use certain flours? Which ones? Do the recipes call for more or less liquid than the gluten-filled versions? Do they tend to have more eggs or extra vanilla? Do they tend to use the same cooking temperature and time?

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Living Gluten-Free: Why You Need to Find Out Whether It’s Really Celiac Disease

Article / Updated 03-26-2016

If for any reason you or a family member have symptoms that you believe are due to gluten, do not commit yourself or a family member to a long-term gluten-free diet without first seeing a physician to have appropriate evaluation to determine whether celiac disease or some other potentially serious medical disorder is present. Here are some of the many reasons why you or your family member should not follow a gluten-free diet without knowing what is being treated: A gluten-free diet may not be the correct treatment for the underlying medical problem. A gluten-free diet, for instance, won’t help inflammatory bowel disease. If you have been on a gluten-free diet for a number of months or more, it makes it more difficult to determine whether you have celiac disease. Similarly, screening family members for celiac disease is more difficult if they are already on a gluten-free diet. A gluten-free diet is expensive, especially if the whole family eats gluten-free. Why spend this extra money if you don’t have to? Make sure at least someone in the family has a good reason to be eating gluten-free (be it celiac disease or gluten sensitivity) before committing to this expense. You face some risk of being less well-nourished on a gluten-free diet. Before you put yourself on a gluten-free diet you should first meet with a registered dietitian to receive their expert advice. For medical insurance and tax reasons, a proven diagnosis of celiac disease can be important. Simply advising an insurer or tax department that you felt better not consuming gluten is unlikely to be sufficient to assist you with any insurance claims or applications for tax deductions.

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Recipe for Eggs in a Bread Basket

Article / Updated 03-26-2016

This gluten-free recipe for eggs in a bread basket is so quick and easy to make that you'll forget the excuse, "I don't have time for breakfast." Preparation time: 5 minutes Cooking time: 5 minutes Yield: 4 servings 4 slices gluten-free bread 4 tablespoons margarine 4 eggs Heat a griddle or large nonstick frying pan over medium-high heat. While the pan is heating, butter both sides of each piece of bread. In the center of each bread slice, cut out a circle about the size of an egg. You can use a knife to cut the circle, or use a cookie cutter to make cute shapes. Make sure the pan or griddle is hot enough that if you put a drop of water on it, the water sizzles. When the pan or griddle is hot, put all the bread — slices and cutouts — on the pan or griddle to fry. When the bottom side of the bread is golden brown, after about 2 minutes, flip each slice and cutout. Crack an egg into the hole in the center of each slice of bread. You may find that you have too much egg and that it covers the bread. That's okay. When the second side of the bread is golden brown, after about 2 minutes, flip it over again to cook the egg on the other side. Cook the egg until it's at the firmness you enjoy, and serve the "eggs in a basket" with the cooked cutouts as decorative additions. If you'd like to cut out a lot of the cholesterol, toss the egg yolks and simply make this recipe with the whites. Per serving: Calories 318 (From Fat 205); Fat 23g (Saturated 5g); Cholesterol 213mg; Sodium 196mg; Carbohydrate 21g (Dietary Fiber 1g); Protein 7g.

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Shredded Pork Recipe

Article / Updated 03-26-2016

This gluten-free shredded pork recipe can be used to make a variety of meals. Dress it up with condiments and extras such as sour cream, shredded lettuce, refried beans, olives, salsa, diced tomatoes, jalapeño peppers, spicy carrots, and guacamole, and use it for the following: Burritos Enchiladas Fajitas Nachos Quesadillas Salads Sandwiches Tacos Tostadas Yes, meat is gluten-free initially. If you buy roasts, chops, or any other whole piece of meat, you don't need to be concerned from a gluten standpoint. If, however, you pick up a package of marinated beef kebabs or preseasoned pork tenderloin, you'll need to check what ingredients have been used in the marinade and seasonings. Preparation time: 15 minutes Cooking time: 4–5 hours Yield: 4 servings 2 pounds boneless pork shoulder-blade roast 1 cup chicken broth 2 large onions, cut into quarters 4 jalapeño peppers, sliced 3 teaspoons minced garlic (about 6 cloves) 2 teaspoons ground coriander 2 teaspoons ground cumin 2 teaspoons dried, crushed oregano Salt and pepper to taste Trim the fat from the pork. Place all the meat in the slow cooker, cutting the pork roast into pieces if it doesn't fit. Add the chicken broth, onions, jalapeño peppers, garlic, coriander, cumin, oregano, and salt and pepper. Cover and cook the pork on the high-heat setting for 4 to 5 hours. Use a slotted spoon to get the meat out of the liquid; discard the liquid. When the meat cools, use two forks to shred it. Per serving: Calories 393 (From Fat 194); Fat 22g (Saturated 7g); Cholesterol 133mg; Sodium 510mg; Carbohydrate 9g (Dietary Fiber 3g); Protein 39g.

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Chocolate Chip Cookies Recipe

Article / Updated 03-26-2016

Just because you have to avoid wheat flour doesn't mean you have to skip cookies! This gluten-free recipe for classic chocolate chip cookies is perfect for any occasion. You can make the cookie dough well ahead of time and chill or even freeze it until you're ready to bake. That's a huge time savings in the kitchen. And you impress people who drop by unexpectedly when you whip some just-baked cookies out of the oven. Preparation time: 20 minutes, plus chilling time Cooking time: 15 minutes Yield: 48 servings 1-3/4 cups plus 3 tablespoons (284 grams) White Flour Mix (see recipe below) 1/3 cup minus 1 teaspoon (42 grams) Whole-Grain Flour Mix (see recipe below) 1 teaspoon baking powder 1/2 teaspoon salt 1 cup packed brown sugar 3/4 cup granulated sugar 1 cup butter, softened 2 eggs 1 teaspoon vanilla 2 cups chocolate chips 1 cup chopped walnuts or pecans In a large bowl, combine the White Flour Mix, Whole-Grain Flour Mix, baking powder, salt, brown sugar, and granulated sugar; mix until the mixture is one color. Add the softened butter and beat until sandy crumbs form. Add the eggs and vanilla and beat until well combined. The batter will be quite soft. Add the chips and nuts and stir until well mixed. Cover the dough and chill at least 2 hours or overnight. If you can, chill the dough up to 2 days. This rest lets the flours absorb the moisture in the dough and lets the brown sugar create a true caramel undertone in the cookie. When you're ready to bake, preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Line cookie sheets with parchment paper or grease them lightly. Drop the dough by teaspoons, 2 inches apart, onto the prepared cookie sheets. Bake for 15 to 16 minutes, rotating the cookie sheets in the oven halfway through the baking time. Remove the cookies from the oven, let them cool on the sheets for 2 minutes, and then remove them to wire racks to cool completely. You can use dark chocolate chunks, dried tart cherries, or any other type of candy in these delicious cookies. Just keep the total weight of the ingredients you add to 510 to 525 grams and you'll have success. Per serving: Calories 139 (From Fat 70); Fat 8g (Saturated 4g); Cholesterol 19mg; Sodium 38mg; Carbohydrate 18g (Dietary Fiber 1g); Protein 1g. White Flour Mix Preparation time: 10 minutes Yield: 18 cups 5-1/2 cups (685 grams) tapioca flour (also known as tapioca starch) 8 cups (1,370 grams) potato starch 4-1/2 cups minus 1 tablespoon (685 grams) sweet rice flour (glutinous rice flour) In a very large bowl, combine all ingredients and blend using a wire whisk until they're a single color. Store in an airtight container and use in recipes. Note: For accuracy and best results, weigh out the flours for this mix and weigh the mix when you use it in recipes. One cup of this mix weighs 148 grams. You can find glutinous rice flour at local Asian markets. Whole-Grain Flour Mix Preparation time: 10 minutes Yield: 14 cups 4-1/2 cups minus 1 tablespoon (600 grams) brown rice flour 4-3/4 cups plus 2 tablespoons (600 grams) sorghum flour 3-1/4 cups minus 1 tablespoon (400 grams) millet flour 1-3/4 cups (275 grams) sweet rice flour In a large bowl, combine all ingredients until the ­mixture is one color. Use a wire whisk to stir for best results. Store in an airtight container and use in baking recipes in place of flour. Note: Weigh these flours instead of measuring them by volume. You end up with much better results, and you find that with a little experience, weighing is faster than measuring by cups. One cup of this mix weighs 135 grams.

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Breakfast Bread Pudding Recipe

Article / Updated 03-26-2016

This gluten-free recipe for breakfast bread pudding is sure to be a hit at your next brunch party. Because of the soaking time required, assemble this the night before. Use orange juice in place of the rum. Preparation time: 10 minutes plus refrigeration time Cooking time: 20 minutes Yield: 9 servings 4 eggs 2/3 cup whole milk 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon 4 teaspoons vanilla 1/2 cup plus 1 tablespoon brown sugar 1/4 teaspoon baking powder 6 slices gluten-free bread 3/4 cup raisins 2 tablespoons dark rum Nonstick cooking spray 1 banana, sliced thinly 2 teaspoons cinnamon sugar 3 tablespoons maple syrup In a large bowl, whisk together the eggs, whole milk, cinnamon, vanilla, 1/2 cup of the brown sugar, and baking powder. Cut the bread slices into small cubes, and then stir them into the egg mixture. Cover the mixture and refrigerate it for at least 2 hours. In a small bowl, stir the raisins into the rum. Cover the mixture and let it cure at room temperature for at least 2 hours. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F. Spray a 9-x-9-inch baking pan with cooking spray. Stir the raisins into the bread mixture. Spoon half of the soaked bread into the prepared pan. Slice the banana on top of the bread and sprinkle with remaining 1 tablespoon brown sugar. Spoon the remaining bread over the banana slices, pouring any remaining egg mixture on top. Press down gently on the bread cubes to even out the top. Sprinkle the top of the pudding with cinnamon sugar. Bake the pudding for 20 minutes, or until the top is lightly browned. Remove the pudding from the oven and drizzle it with maple syrup. Cool the pudding for 10 minutes before cutting. Per serving: Calories 239; Fat 5g (Saturated 1g); Cholesterol 96mg; Sodium 72mg; Carbohydrate 43g (Dietary Fiber 2g); Protein 4g.

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Gluten-Free Sandwich Bread Recipe

Article / Updated 03-26-2016

When you want a soft, simple sandwich bread, this gluten-free recipe is it. It slices perfectly and has a wonderful texture. This bread stays nice and soft for several days after baking because it's enriched with egg and milk. Preparation time: 15 minutes, plus rise time Cooking time: 40 minutes Yield: 8 servings 1/2 cup water 1/2 cup milk 2 tablespoons honey 2 tablespoons oil 2 teaspoons salt 2-1/4 cups minus 1 teaspoon (300 grams) Whole-Grain Flour Mix (see recipe below) 1-1/4 cups plus 1 tablespoon (196 grams) White Flour Mix (see recipe below) 1 egg Grease an 8-x-4-inch baking pan using nonstick cooking spray or unsalted butter and set aside. In a large mixing bowl, combine all ingredients. Beat at medium speed for 2 minutes. Pour the mixture into the prepared pan, cover, and let it rise in a warm place until doubled, about 1 to 1-1/2 hours. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Place the bread in the center of the oven. Bake for 35 to 40 minutes, or until the bread is golden-brown and the temperature is 190 to 200 degrees F. Remove the bread from the pan and place on a wire rack to cool completely before slicing. Per serving: Calories 281 (From Fat 51); Fat 6g (Saturated 1g); Cholesterol 29mg; Sodium 598mg; Carbohydrate 56g (Dietary Fiber 2g); Protein 5g. Whole-Grain Flour Mix Preparation time: 10 minutes Yield: 14 cups 4-1/2 cups minus 1 tablespoon (600 grams) brown rice flour 4-3/4 cups plus 2 tablespoons (600 grams) sorghum flour 3-1/4 cups minus 1 tablespoon (400 grams) millet flour 1-3/4 cups (275 grams) sweet rice flour In a large bowl, combine all ingredients until the ­mixture is one color. Use a wire whisk to stir for best results. Store in an airtight container and use in baking recipes in place of flour. Note: Weigh these flours instead of measuring them by volume. You end up with much better results, and you find that with a little experience, weighing is faster than measuring by cups. One cup of this mix weighs 135 grams. White Flour Mix Preparation time: 10 minutes Yield: 18 cups 5-1/2 cups (685 grams) tapioca flour (also known as tapioca starch) 8 cups (1,370 grams) potato starch 4-1/2 cups minus 1 tablespoon (685 grams) sweet rice flour (glutinous rice flour) In a very large bowl, combine all ingredients and blend using a wire whisk until they're a single color. Store in an airtight container and use in recipes. Note: For accuracy and best results, weigh out the flours for this mix and weigh the mix when you use it in recipes. One cup of this mix weighs 148 grams. You can find glutinous rice flour at local Asian markets.

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Homemade Graham Crackers Recipe

Article / Updated 03-26-2016

This gluten-free recipe for homemade graham crackers is versatile — use them for that next batch of s'mores, as a pie crust, or as a snack on its own. Preparation time: 40 minutes, plus chilling time Cooking time: 14 minutes  Yield: 44 servings 3-3/4 cups minus 1 tablespoon (495 grams) Whole-Grain Flour Mix (see recipe below) 3 cups minus 2 tablespoons (426 grams) White Flour Mix (see recipe below) 1/2 cup plus 1 teaspoon (81 grams) sweet rice flour 1 tablespoon cinnamon 1 tablespoon baking powder 1/2 teaspoon salt 6 tablespoons packed brown sugar 12 tablespoons unsalted butter 1/3 cup honey 3 teaspoons vanilla 3/4 cup water Line a 9-x-5-inch bread pan with plastic wrap. Make sure the wrap fits into the corners so that the crackers will have rectangular edges. In a large bowl, combine the Whole-Grain Flour Mix, White Flour Mix, sweet rice flour, cinnamon, baking powder, salt, and brown sugar. Mix until the mixture is one color. Add the butter and let the mixer run until the mixture looks like sand, about 2 to 3 minutes. Add the honey, vanilla, and water; beat for 1 minute. Pat the mixture into the prepared pan. Cover with plastic wrap. Pat down the dough to make sure it doesn't have any air bubbles. Refrigerate overnight, or at least 2 hours, before slicing. When ready to bake, preheat the oven to 400 degrees and line cookie sheets with parchment paper. Remove the top layer of plastic wrap and slice the dough into -inch slices. Place the slices on the prepared cookie sheets, leaving 1/2-inch space between each cracker. Dock the crackers by poking holes in the dough with a fork. Bake, two cookie sheets at a time, for 8 minutes. Then rotate the pans and bake 5 to 6 minutes longer, until the crackers are golden-brown. Remove from the oven and let stand on cookie sheets for 2 to 3 minutes; then move the graham crackers to wire racks to cool completely. Per serving: Calories 122 (From Fat 31); Fat 3g (Saturated 2g); Cholesterol 8mg; Sodium 54mg; Carbohydrate 23g (Dietary Fiber 1g); Protein 1g. Whole-Grain Flour Mix Preparation time: 10 minutes Yield: 14 cups 4-1/2 cups minus 1 tablespoon (600 grams) brown rice flour 4-3/4 cups plus 2 tablespoons (600 grams) sorghum flour 3-1/4 cups minus 1 tablespoon (400 grams) millet flour 1-3/4 cups (275 grams) sweet rice flour In a large bowl, combine all ingredients until the ­mixture is one color. Use a wire whisk to stir for best results. Store in an airtight container and use in baking recipes in place of flour. Note: Weigh these flours instead of measuring them by volume. You end up with much better results, and you find that with a little experience, weighing is faster than measuring by cups. One cup of this mix weighs 135 grams. White Flour Mix Preparation time: 10 minutes Yield: 18 cups 5-1/2 cups (685 grams) tapioca flour (also known as tapioca starch) 8 cups (1,370 grams) potato starch 4-1/2 cups minus 1 tablespoon (685 grams) sweet rice flour (glutinous rice flour) In a very large bowl, combine all ingredients and blend using a wire whisk until they're a single color. Store in an airtight container and use in recipes. Note: For accuracy and best results, weigh out the flours for this mix and weigh the mix when you use it in recipes. One cup of this mix weighs 148 grams. You can find glutinous rice flour at local Asian markets.

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