Quick Diabetic Recipes For Dummies book cover

Quick Diabetic Recipes For Dummies

By: American Diabetes Association Published: 01-29-2018

100+ quick and delicious diabetes-friendly recipes

If you have diabetes, watching what you eat is one of the most important things you can do to stay healthy. With the help of the American Diabetes Association, Quick & Easy Diabetic Recipes For Dummies offers 100+ healthy, diabetes-friendly recipes and meal planning ideas–without sacrificing taste. Plus, Quick & Easy Diabetic Recipes For Dummies provides expert tips on the types of food you should keep stocked in your kitchen, advice on healthy cooking techniques, ways to lower fat and cholesterol, and most importantly, what to eat with diabetes.

According to the World Health Organization, the number of adults worldwide affected by diabetes has quadrupled since 1980 to 422 million. Nearly one in 11 people in the United States now have diabetes or prediabetes, and unhealthy eating can worsen the condition and hinder efforts at better management. While those numbers are alarming, the good news is that you can cook and eat your way to better health–and this book makes it easy!

 

•          Make more than 100 tasty recipes, many of which cook in 30 minutes or less

•          Get the total grams of carbohydrates and other nutrients per serving

•          Discover ways to keep a healthier kitchen

 

It’s never been simpler–or tastier–to keep up with your diabetes management. 

Articles From Quick Diabetic Recipes For Dummies

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32 results
Quick Diabetic Recipes For Dummies Cheat Sheet

Cheat Sheet / Updated 04-28-2022

Making healthy food choices is an essential part of successful diabetes management. Cooking diabetes-friendly meals at home is a great way to ensure that you're eating nutritious food; avoiding preservatives and excess fat, sugar, and sodium; and controlling your portion sizes. If you've just been diagnosed with diabetes, you may be wondering where to start when it comes to eating well. Understanding the best food choices for people with diabetes is an important first step. Before you begin cooking healthy recipes at home, learn how to shop for the best ingredients and prepare your kitchen.

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10 Strategies for Healthier Restaurant Meals for Diabetics

Article / Updated 07-09-2019

Cooking healthy meals is an essential skill to make good diabetes management easier. But there are days when eating at home just isn’t in the cards. Maybe you’re planning to go out to dinner with a group of friends, or you’re working late one evening and you won’t have the time or energy to cook when you get home. Or maybe you’d just like to enjoy a meal at your favorite restaurant. It’s important to know how to navigate restaurant menus for occasions like these. Dining out can be challenging for people with diabetes. When you prepare a healthy meal at home, you’re in the driver’s seat; you have complete control over the ingredients and cooking methods you use and the amount of food you serve yourself. You don’t have the same amount of control when you order food at a restaurant. But don’t worry! With a little advance planning and creative thinking, you can find a dish to fit your meal plan on almost any restaurant menu. In this chapter, we explore some tips and techniques to help you find the find the healthiest options when eating out. Research Your Restaurant Believe it or not, you can begin strategizing for your healthy restaurant meal before you even arrive at the restaurant. Take a few minutes before heading out the door to think about the restaurants in your area and select one that will make it easy for you to enjoy a healthy meal. If you’re not sure what kind of food a restaurant offers, call the restaurant or see if its menu is available online. The Internet is a helpful resource when you’re trying to plan restaurant meals — take advantage of it! Many restaurants now provide their full menu online, and most even include nutrition information. Ideally, you’ll want to look for a restaurant that offers a variety of different dishes featuring nutritious ingredients such as nonstarchy vegetables, whole grains, and lean proteins. If the restaurant you choose has nutrition information for its dishes available online, you’re one step ahead of the game! You can use this information to figure out exactly how different menu items will fit into your meal plan. It may be a good idea to identify a few options that will work for you before you leave home; that way, you’ll be less tempted to order unhealthy menu items when you get to the restaurant. Ask Your Server Even if you’re able to research the restaurant’s menu beforehand, you may have questions about the menu when you arrive. A dish may sound healthy on the menu, but there can be hidden sources of fat and calories in the dish that aren’t mentioned in the description of the item. Don’t be afraid to ask your server exactly what’s in the dish and how it’s prepared. Your server may not know all the ingredients or the cooking method offhand, but he or she can check with the chef. Knowing what goes into the dish you’re about to eat will give you a better understanding of how that dish will fit into your diabetes meal plan. If it sounds healthy on the menu, but it’s cooked in butter or has a lot of added sodium, you may want to look for another option. Communication with your server is important. If you’re having trouble finding good choices on the menu, he or she may be able to steer you in the right direction. Make Special Requests If you find a dish on the menu that sounds very appealing but has some less-than-healthy ingredients, feel free to make special requests and ask about substitutions. A few small changes to a dish can make all the difference when it comes to eating healthy, and most restaurants will be happy to accommodate your needs. If your dish comes with a choice of side items, look for the healthiest options available. That may mean choosing brown rice over white or fried rice, or steamed vegetables instead of mac and cheese. If you have more than one choice, why not double up on nonstarchy vegetables such as green beans, broccoli, cauliflower, asparagus, Brussels sprouts, or a side salad. Even if the menu doesn’t offer a choice of sides, you can request to replace starchy sides like fries, potatoes, and rice with healthier options. Many restaurant dishes are made with healthy ingredients but are cooked in a lot of fat or are topped with high-calorie sauces. Request that the chef leave any heavy sauce off your dish. Or ask the server if a dish can be steamed, grilled, or sautéed in a small amount of olive oil instead of fried or cooked in butter. If you’re watching your sodium intake, ask if your meal can be prepared without added salt. Don’t forget about condiments! Many condiments are sources of fat and carbohydrate. Request mustard on your burger instead of mayonnaise, or skip the dipping cups of barbecue sauce or ranch dressing. Ask your server if the restaurant has low-fat salad dressings that they can substitute for the full-fat version on your salad. Be respectful of your server, but don’t be shy about asking questions and making special requests. Be direct and polite and the restaurant should be able to accommodate your needs. Helpful Substitutions Swapping out some of the less-healthy ingredients in a dish for more nutritious options is a great way to enjoy the menu item you’re craving without disrupting your meal plan. There are a few common restaurant foods and ingredients that you’ll want to request substitutions for whenever you can. Here are a few common substitutions to get you started: Instead of … Try … Alfredo sauce Marinara sauce Cheese and/or bacon (on sandwiches) Extra fresh vegetables Cream-based soup Clear broth soup Flour tortillas Corn or whole-wheat tortillas Fried chicken strips Chicken kabobs or satay Fried mozzarella sticks Caprese (mozzarella and tomato) salad Fried rice Steamed brown rice Heavy sauces Sautéed mushrooms or onions Mayonnaise Mustard Meat pizza Veggie pizza Pan, deep-dish, or stuffed-crust pizza Thin-crust pizza Refried beans Black beans Sour cream Salsa Tempura meat or vegetables Steamed or grilled meat or vegetables Skip the Extras Even if you order a nutritious restaurant dish that fits into your meal plan, it can be easy to get off track when the free bread basket or chips and salsa arrive at the table. These items can contribute a significant amount of extra calories or carbohydrate to your meal. If you have the self-control to have just a bite of bread or a few chips, that’s fine. If not, you may want to skip these foods altogether and ask your server not to bring them to the table. Appetizers are another source of extra calories that you may want to avoid. If you’re really craving a certain appetizer, try to split it with others at the table so you only eat a small portion. Make sure you account for it in your meal plan. If you’re very hungry when you arrive at the restaurant, try ordering a side salad with low-fat dressing instead of ordering an appetizer or reaching for the bread basket. Don’t Drink Your Calories It can be tempting to order a regular soda, sweetened iced tea, or maybe even a cocktail with your dish, but these drinks can add a lot of calories and carbohydrate to your meal (which is likely already higher in calories than the meals you cook at home). Save those calories for the food on your plate. If you skip that 120-calorie serving of soda, you may have room in your meal plan to add an extra serving of nonstarchy vegetables to your plate; it’s the more satisfying and nutritious option. Remember that mixers in alcoholic beverages (besides diet soda) generally contain carbohydrate and calories as well. Try to stick with zero-calorie beverages when you eat out. Water is always a great choice, but you can try diet soda, sparkling water, unsweetened tea, or black coffee. Take Half Home Another key aspect of healthy restaurant eating is portion control. Restaurants today often serve customers huge portions of food, much more than the average person needs to eat. It’s up to you to make sure you don’t overeat. This is especially important if you’re indulging in a less-healthy menu item — but the calories and carbohydrate still add up if you eat a large portion of a healthier dish. If you’re concerned about the portion size of your meal, ask for a take-home container and pack up half of the food on your plate before you begin eating. You’ll be less likely to overeat if you have an appropriate portion of food in front of you. Out of sight, out of mind. Take the leftovers home and enjoy them for lunch or dinner the next day! Get Creative with the Menu When it comes to healthy restaurant eating, sometimes it’s helpful to think outside the box. Don’t feel pressure to order an entrée for yourself just because that’s what other people may be doing. Get creative with the menu! You may be able to build yourself a healthier meal using different menu options. For people trying to reduce their portion sizes, sharing an entrée (or even just an appetizer) with a friend or loved one is an option. Or you can choose a few healthy side dishes as your main dish. Believe it or not, the side dishes are sometimes the most nutritious items on a menu. Most sit-down restaurants offer at least one or two nonstarchy vegetable side dishes, and in some restaurants you may find beans, whole grains, or even lentils in the list of sides. And portion sizes for side dishes are generally small. Try selecting one or two healthy side options and maybe pairing them with a small salad or broth-based soup as your meal. Another idea for creating a healthy meal is to add extra nonstarchy vegetables to a dish. Add a side salad with light dressing to an entrée, for example, or ask to add extra fresh vegetables to a sandwich, wrap, or burger. Extra nonstarchy vegetables can add nutrients to your meal and may fill you up so you eat less of the other items on your plate. These are just a few ideas — don’t be afraid to take advantage of different menu option to create a meal that’s right for you. Order Takeout before You’re Hungry As with any restaurant meal, it’s important to make healthy food choices and watch your portions sizes when ordering takeout from a restaurant. But ordering takeout gives you added advantage: You can order your food before you’re hungry. It’s easier to choose nutritious foods and avoid overeating if you’re not starving when you order. If you know you’ll be ordering takeout, make a conscious effort to choose and order your food before you start feeling hungry. Some restaurants may even let you order a few hours in advance. Lock in your order early so you won’t be tempted by unhealthy options when you’re hungry later on. Choose Fast Foods Wisely Eating at fast-food restaurants can be particularly challenging for people with diabetes, so you may want to avoid fast-food restaurants when you can. But fast food may be a reality of your fast-paced lifestyle. There will be days when you’re extremely busy or you’re traveling and fast food seems like your only option. If you find yourself in this situation, here are a few tips that can help you make the healthiest possible choices: Order regular-size or “junior” sandwiches from the menu rather than “double” or “deluxe” items, which are often much larger. Avoid high-fat sandwich toppings like bacon, cheese, mayonnaise, and barbecue sauce. Opt instead for extra veggies and mustard. Opt for grilled or broiled fish and chicken instead of fried proteins and beef. They’re leaner. Avoid meal deals. They may seem like a bargain because you get more food for less, but what you’re really getting is large portions of fried foods and sugary beverages. Substitute a side salad or fresh fruit for fries if possible. Go bunless. Removing half or all of the bun from your sandwich can save you several grams of carbohydrate. Choose water, diet soda, unsweetened tea, or black coffee as your beverage. Remember that you can make special requests when ordering fast food, too! Don’t be afraid to ask the restaurant to accommodate your needs. Just be aware that it may take a few extra minutes for them to prepare a special order. If you find a healthy order that works for you at your favorite fast-food restaurant, remember it so you can easily order it again when you need to.

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Quick and Diabetic-Friendly Seafood Recipes

Article / Updated 06-14-2018

You don’t have to visit the coast to enjoy delicious seafood dishes! These recipes will help you fit rich, tasty seafood into your everyday diabetes meal plan. Fish and other kinds of seafood are a relatively lean type of protein, which makes them a good choice for people with diabetes; fish that contain omega-3 fatty acids (a “healthy” fat) are especially good options. However, when most people think of eating seafood, they probably picture battered, fried fish and shrimp or lobster soaked in melted butter. These kinds of seafood dishes are luxurious, but they can add a lot of unhealthy saturated fat to your diet. Try to avoid breaded and fried seafood and heavy sauces when choosing seafood options. Baked Garlic Scampi Preparation time: About 5 minutes Cook time: 10 minutes Servings: 4 Serving size: 3 ounces and 1/2 cup arugula Ingredients 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil 1/4 teaspoon salt 7 garlic cloves, crushed 2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley, divided 1 pound large shrimp, shelled (with tails left on) and deveined Juice and zest of 1 lemon 2 cups baby arugula Directions Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Grease a 13-x-9-x-2-inch baking pan with the olive oil. Add the salt, garlic, and 1 tablespoon of the parsley in a medium bowl; mix well and set aside. Arrange the shrimp in a single layer in the baking pan, and bake for 3 minutes, uncovered. Turn the shrimp, and sprinkle with the lemon peel, lemon juice, and the remaining 1 tablespoon of parsley. Continue to bake 1–2 minutes more until the shrimp are bright pink and tender. Remove the shrimp from the oven. Place the arugula on a serving platter, and top with the shrimp. Spoon the garlic mixture over the shrimp and arugula and serve. If possible, use fresh (never frozen) shrimp or shrimp that are free of preservatives — for example, shrimp that have not been treated with salt or sodium tripolyphosphate (STPP). Per serving: Choices/Exchanges 2 Lean Protein; Calories 110 (from Fat 30); Fat 3.5g (Saturated 0.5g, Trans 0.0g); Cholesterol 120mg; Sodium 220mg; Potassium 250mg; Total Carbohydrate 3g (Dietary Fiber 0g, Sugars 1g); Protein 16g; Phosphorus 165mg. Broiled Sole with Mustard Sauce Preparation time: About 5 minutes Cook time: 20 minutes Servings: 6 Serving size: 3 ounces with sauce Ingredients Nonstick cooking spray 1-1/2 pound fresh sole filets 3 tablespoons low-fat mayonnaise 2 tablespoons Dijon mustard 2 tablespoons chopped parsley 1/8 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 1 large lemon, cut into wedges Directions Preheat broiler. Coat a baking sheet with nonstick cooking spray. Arrange the filets so they don’t overlap. In a small bowl, combine the mayonnaise, mustard, parsley, and pepper, and mix thoroughly. Spread the mixture evenly over the filets. Broil 3–4 inches from the heat for 4 minutes until the fish flakes easily with a fork. Arrange the filets on a serving platter, garnish with lemon wedges, and serve. Try this recipe over blanched broccoli or string beans. Chicken and salmon fillets work well with this recipe, too. Per serving: Exchanges 3 Lean Protein; Calories 120 (from Fat 20); Fat 2g (Saturated 0.4g, Trans 0.0g); Cholesterol 60 mg; Sodium 280mg; Potassium 330mg; Total Carbohydrate 2g (Dietary Fiber 0g, Sugars 1g); Protein 22g; Phosphorus 265mg. Flounder Parmesan Preparation time: About 5 minutes Cook time: 20 minutes Servings: 4 Serving size: 3–4 ounces Ingredients 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil Four 4-ounce flounder filets 1 cup marinara sauce 1/4 cup freshly grated Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese 4 ounces skim milk mozzarella Directions Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F. Grease a baking dish with the olive oil and place the fish filets on the dish. Pour the Marina Sauce over the fish. Top with the Parmigiano-Reggiano Cheese and mozzarella. Bake for 12–15 minutes, or until the fish is cooked through and the mozzarella is bubbly. Transfer to a platter and serve. Per serving: Choices/Exchanges 1 Nonstarchy Vegetable, 4 Lean Protein, 1 Fat; Calories 250 (from Fat 100); Fat 11g (Saturated 4.7g, Trans 0.0g); Cholesterol 85mg; Sodium 310mg; Potassium 530mg; Total Carbohydrate 6g (Dietary Fiber 2g, Sugars 3g); Protein 31g; Phosphorus 450mg.

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Quick and Diabetic-Friendly Lamb Recipes

Article / Updated 06-14-2018

Even if you’re already an expert at preparing healthy beef and pork at home, you’ll be pleased to find a couple of simple, elegant lamb recipes here that are sure to impress your friends and family! These healthy, delicious recipes will turn any night into a special occasion. Lamb Chops with Orange Sauce Preparation time: About 5 minutes plus marinating time Cook time: 20 minutes Servings: 4 Serving size: 2 lamb chops with sauce Ingredients 1/2 cup freshly squeezed orange juice 2 tablespoons orange zest 1 teaspoon fresh or 1/2 teaspoon dried thyme 1/8 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper Nonstick cooking spray 8 small lean lamb chops, about 1/2-inch thick (about 4 ounces each) 1 cup sliced fresh mushrooms 1/2 cup dry white wine Directions In a shallow baking dish, combine the orange juice, orange zest, thyme, and pepper; mix well. Trim all excess fat from the lamb chops and place in a baking dish. Spoon the orange juice mixture over the chops; cover, and refrigerate for 3–4 hours, occasionally turning chops. Coat a large skillet with nonstick cooking spray; place over medium-high heat until hot. Remove the chops from the marinade, reserving the marinade; arrange in the skillet. Brown the chops on both sides, remove from the skillet, and set on a plate lined with paper towels. Reduce the heat to medium, add the mushrooms, and sauté until just tender. Stir in the reserved marinade and wine and bring to a boil. Return the lamb chops to the skillet; cover, reduce heat, and simmer for 10–12 minutes or until the sauce is reduced to about 1/2 cup. Transfer the lamb chops to a platter, spoon the orange sauce on top, and serve. Try serving these delicious orange lamb chops with baby peas or French green beans. Per serving: Choices/Exchanges @@bf1/2 Carbohydrate, 4 Lean Protein, 1/2 Fat; Calories 250 (from Fat 90); Fat 10g (Saturated 3.5g, Trans 0.0g); Cholesterol 95mg; Sodium 85mg; Potassium 510mg; Total Carbohydrate 5g (Dietary Fiber 1g, Sugars 3g); Protein 31g; Phosphorus 250mg. Marinated Leg of Lamb Preparation time: About 5 minutes plus marinating time Cook time: 40 minutes Servings: 16 Serving size: 3-1/2, 4 ounces Ingredients 1 leg of lamb (7 pounds including bone), boned, butterflied, and visible fat removed 3 cups dry red wine 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil 2 medium onions, sliced 1 large carrot, thinly sliced 6 parsley sprigs 2 bay leaves, crumbled 4 cloves garlic, minced 1/8 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper Fresh parsley sprigs Directions In a large ceramic, glass, or stainless-steel dish (anything but plastic), combine all the ingredients except the parsley sprigs; cover, refrigerate, and let marinate for 1–2 days, turning occasionally. After marinating, drain the lamb, discard the marinade, and pat dry. Season with salt, if desired. Place the lamb into a grill basket. Broil the lamb 3–4 inches from the heat for 15–20 minutes per side. Transfer the lamb to a cutting board and let cool slightly. Carve the lamb diagonally; transfer to a serving platter, garnish with parsley sprigs, and serve. Serve with sautéed carrots and oven-roasted potatoes. Per serving: Choices/Exchanges 4 Lean Protein; Calories 200 (from Fat 70); Fat 8g (Saturated 3.2g, Trans 0.0g); Cholesterol 90mg; Sodium 75mg; Potassium 350mg; Total Carbohydrate 0g (Dietary Fiber 0g, Sugars 0g); Protein 29g; Phosphorus 230mg.

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Quick and Diabetic-Friendly Pork Recipes

Article / Updated 06-14-2018

Beef, pork, lamb, and veal are hearty and delicious protein options, but they’re generally higher in saturated fat than other types of protein such as poultry and fish. You can enjoy lean cuts of pork without jeopardizing your healthy-eating goals. Pork Chops Milanese Preparation time: About 5 minutes Cook time: 20 minutes Servings: 4 Serving size: 1 pork chop Ingredients 3/4 cup Homemade Seasoned Bread Crumbs 1 tablespoon Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese Four 3-ounce lean boneless pork chops, trimmed of fat 1 egg and 1/4 cup water, slightly beaten 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil 2 large lemons, cut into wedges Directions In a shallow bowl, combine the bread crumbs and Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese. Dip the pork chops in the egg mixture, and dredge in the bread crumb mixture. In a large nonstick skillet, heat the olive oil. Add the pork chops and brown on both sides. Reduce the heat, cover, and sauté for 3–5 minutes. Remove cover and cook 5–10 minutes more until the pork is no longer pink, and a meat thermometer inserted in the thickest part of the meat reads 145 degrees. Squeeze 2 or 3 lemon wedges over the chops. Transfer to a serving platter, garnish with the remaining lemon wedges, and serve. Chicken, turkey, veal, beef, and fish fillets can also be prepared this way. Per serving: Choices/Exchanges 1/2 Starch, 3 Lean Protein, 1/2 Fat; Calories 200 (from Fat 100); Fat 11g (Saturated 3.0g, Trans 0.0g); Cholesterol 90mg; Sodium 170mg; Potassium 280mg; Total Carbohydrate 8g (Dietary Fiber 1g, Sugars 1g); Protein 19g; Phosphorus 190mg. Apple Cinnamon Pork Chops Preparation time: About 5 minutes Cook time: 20 minutes Servings: 2 Serving size: 1 pork chop with apples Ingredients 2 teaspoons extra-virgin olive oil 1 large apple, sliced 1/2 teaspoon organic cinnamon 1/8 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg Two 3-ounce lean boneless pork chops, trimmed of fat Directions In a medium nonstick skillet, heat the olive oil. Add the apple slices, and sauté until just tender. Sprinkle with cinnamon and nutmeg, remove from heat, and keep warm. Place the pork chops in the skillet and cook thoroughly; a meat thermometer inserted into the thickest part of the meat should reach 145 degrees. Remove the pork chops from the skillet, arrange on a serving platter, spoon the apple slices on top, and serve. Cinnamon is beneficial in regulating blood sugar levels. Consider serving this dish with baked sweet potatoes or quinoa, also sprinkled with cinnamon. Chicken and turkey also work well in this recipe. Per serving: Choices/Exchanges 1 Fruit, 2 Lean Protein, 1 Fat; Calories 210 (from Fat 90); Fat 10g (Saturated 2.6g, Trans 0.0g); Cholesterol 45mg; Sodium 35mg; Potassium 340mg; Total Carbohydrate 15g (Dietary Fiber 3g, Sugars 11g); Protein 16g; Phosphorus 145mg.

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Quick and Diabetic-Friendly Beef Recipes

Article / Updated 06-14-2018

These diabetes-friendly dishes are full of rich flavors. People with diabetes can enjoy red meats and pork, but they should eat these proteins in moderation and try to choose the leanest, highest-quality cuts available. Quinoa-Stuffed Peppers Preparation time: About 15 minute Cook time: 45 minutes Servings: 4 Serving size: 1 pepper Ingredients 4 medium bell peppers, red or green (or both) 1 pound lean ground sirloin 1 small onion, minced 2/3 cup cooked quinoa 1 cup sautéed spinach 1/4 cup chopped fresh oregano or cilantro 1/8 teaspoon salt 1/8 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper One 8-ounce can tomato sauce, divided 1/4 cup pinot noir or chianti Directions Slice off the stem end of each pepper and remove the seeds. In a medium bowl, combine the beef, onion, quinoa, spinach, oregano, salt, pepper, and 1⁄3 cup tomato sauce; mix well. Stuff the mixture into the peppers and place them in a medium saucepan. Pour the wine and remaining tomato sauce over the peppers. Bring the peppers to a boil; cover, and let simmer until tender, about 45 minutes. Add a few tablespoons of water if the sauce begins to cook away. Transfer to a serving platter, drizzle the remaining sauce over the top, and serve. You can use this basic filling to stuff zucchini or yellow squash, too. Per serving: Choices/Exchanges 1/2 Starch, 3 Nonstarchy Vegetable, 4 Lean Protein; Calories 280 (from Fat 50); Fat 6g (Saturated 1.7g, Trans 0.2g); Cholesterol 80mg; Sodium 460mg; Potassium 1260mg; Total Carbohydrate 23g (Dietary Fiber 6g, Sugars 9g); Protein 31g; Phosphorus 385mg. Creole Steak Preparation time: About 5 minutes Cook time: 1 hour 40 minutes Servings: 4 Serving size: 3 ounces Ingredients 2 teaspoons extra-virgin olive oil 1/4 cup chopped onion 1/4 cup chopped green bell pepper 1 cup canned crushed tomatoes 1/2 teaspoon chili powder 1/4 teaspoon celery seed 4 cloves garlic, finely chopped 1/4 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon cumin 1 pound lean boneless round steak Directions In a large skillet over medium heat, heat the oil. Add the onions and green pepper, and sauté until the onions are translucent (about 5 minutes). Add the tomatoes, chili powder, celery seed, garlic, salt, and cumin; cover and let simmer over low heat for 20–25 minutes. This allows the flavors to blend. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Trim all visible fat off the steak. In a nonstick pan or a pan that has been sprayed with nonstick cooking spray, lightly brown the steak on each side. Transfer the steak to a 13-x-9-x-2-inch baking dish; pour the sauce over the steak, and cover. Bake for 1-1/4 hours or until the steak is tender. Remove from the oven; slice the steak and arrange on a serving platter. Spoon the sauce over the steak and serve. Lamb would also work well in this recipe. Serve with brown rice or mashed cauliflower. In addition to its great flavor, cumin is also known for its anti-inflammatory properties. Because inflammation plays a role in illness, reducing it can lead to better overall health. Per serving: Choices/Exchanges 1 Nonstarchy Vegetable, 4 Lean Protein; Calories 200 (from Fat 50); Fat 6g (Saturated 1.6g, Trans 0.0g); Cholesterol 50mg; Sodium 270mg; Potassium 450mg; Total Carbohydrate 7g (Dietary Fiber 2g, Sugars 3g); Protein 28g; Phosphorus 195mg.

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Quick and Diabetic-Friendly Poultry Recipes

Article / Updated 06-14-2018

Lean cuts of poultry make quick, delicious meals and are a great protein option for people with diabetes. From fun and tasty chicken tenders to juicy turkey burgers, nothing says “family favorite” like poultry. The healthiest poultry choices for people with diabetes are white meat cuts like breasts and tenderloins with the skin removed. Dark meat cuts and duck contain more fat, so it’s a good idea to enjoy these in moderation. Chicken and Vegetable Stir-Fry Preparation time: About 10 minutes Cook time: 20 minutes Servings: 8 Serving size: One 3- to 4-ounce chicken breast plus 1/2 cup vegetables/sauce Ingredients 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil Four 8-ounce boneless, skinless chicken breasts, cut into thin strips about 1⁄8 inch wide 2 garlic cloves, minced 2 teaspoons grated fresh ginger 1 tablespoon light soy sauce 1 cup sliced celery 1 cup sliced fresh mushrooms 2 cup julienned zucchini 2 teaspoons cornstarch Directions In a large skillet or wok, heat the oil. Add the chicken, garlic, and ginger. Stir-fry until the chicken turns white, about 5 minutes. Stir in the soy sauce, celery, mushrooms, and zucchini. Cover, and continue to cook for about 5 minutes. In a small bowl, mix the cornstarch and 3 tablespoons of water until well combined. Slowly add this mixture to the chicken, stirring constantly. Continue to cook for 2–5 minutes, until mixture is thickened. Remove from the heat and serve. You can also use squash and red or green bell peppers in the recipe. It works well with turkey breast, too. Per serving: Choices/Exchanges 3 Lean Protein; Calories 160 (from Fat 40); Fat 4.5g (Saturated 1.0g, Trans 0.0g); Cholesterol 65mg; Sodium 140mg; Potassium 340mg; Total Carbohydrate 3g (Dietary Fiber 1g, Sugars 1g); Protein 25g; Phosphorus 200mg. Grilled Lemon Mustard Chicken Prep time: About 5 minutes plus marinating time Cook time: 15 minutes Servings: 6 Serving size: 3 ounces Ingredients Juice of 6 medium lemons 1/2 cup mustard seeds 1 tablespoon minced fresh tarragon 2 tablespoons freshly ground black pepper 4 garlic cloves, minced 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil Three 8-ounce boneless, skinless chicken breasts, halved Directions In a small mixing bowl, combine the lemon juice, mustard seeds, tarragon, pepper, garlic, and oil; mix well. Place the chicken in a baking dish and pour the marinade on top. Cover, and refrigerate overnight. Grill the chicken over medium heat for 10–15 minutes, basting with the marinade. Serve hot. Per serving: Choices/Exchanges 1/2 Carbohydrate, 4 Lean Protein, 1 Fat; Calories 260 (from Fat 120); Fat 13g (Saturated 1.7g, Trans 0.0g); Cholesterol 65mg; Sodium 70mg; Potassium 390mg; Total Carbohydrate 9g (Dietary Fiber 3g, Sugars 2g); Protein 28g; Phosphorus 310mg. Herbed Cornish Hens Preparation time: About 5 minutes plus marinating time Cook time: 30 minutes Servings: 8 Serving size: 1/2 Cornish hen Ingredients 4 Cornish hens, giblets removed (about 1-1/4 pound each) 2 cups white wine, divided 2 garlic cloves, minced 1 small onion, minced 1/2 teaspoon celery seeds 1/2 teaspoon poultry seasoning 1/2 teaspoon paprika 1/2 teaspoon dried oregano 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper Directions Using a long, sharp knife, split each hen lengthwise. You may also buy precut hens. Place the hens, cavity side up, on a rack in a shallow roasting pan. Pour 1-1/2 cups of the wine over the hens; set aside. In a shallow bowl, combine the garlic, onion, celery seeds, poultry seasoning, paprika, oregano, and pepper. Sprinkle half of the combined seasonings over the cavity of each split half. Cover, and refrigerate. Allow the hens to marinate for 2–3 hours. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Bake the hens uncovered for 1 hour. Remove from the oven, turn breast side up, and remove the skin. Pour the remaining 1/2 cup of wine over the top, and sprinkle with the remaining seasonings. Continue to bake for an additional 25–30 minutes, basting every 10 minutes until the hens are done. Transfer to a serving platter, and serve hot. Per serving:Choices/Exchanges 4 Lean Protein; Calories 190 (from Fat 45); Fat 5g (Saturated 1.2g, Trans 0.0g); Cholesterol 130mg; Sodium 80mg; Potassium 350mg; Total Carbohydrate 2g (Dietary Fiber 0g, Sugars 1g); Protein 29g; Phosphorus 195mg. Slow-Roasted Turkey Breast in Beer-Mustard Sauce Preparation time: About 5 minutes Cook time: 2-1/2 hours Servings: 10 Serving size: 3 ounces turkey Ingredients 5-pound, bone-in turkey breast, skin removed 1 tablespoon prepared mustard 1/2 cup light beer 1/4 cup red wine vinegar 3/4 cup ketchup 1 tablespoon no-added-salt tomato paste 1/2 cup spicy no-added-salt tomato juice (or spice up mild juice with several drops of hot pepper sauce) 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper Directions Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Spread the turkey breast with mustard. In a small bowl, combine the beer, vinegar, ketchup, tomato paste, and tomato juice. Pour the mixture over the turkey, and then sprinkle with pepper. Roast, covered, for 1-1/2 hours at 350 degrees F. Remove the cover, and roast an additional 1 hour, basting occasionally. Transfer to a serving platter and serve. Per serving: Choices/Exchanges 1/2 Carbohydrate, 5 Lean Protein; Calories 220 (from Fat 25); Fat 3g (Saturated 0.8g, Trans 0.0g); Cholesterol 105mg; Sodium 350mg; Potassium 440mg; Total Carbohydrate 6g (Dietary Fiber 0g, Sugars 5g); Protein 39g; Phosphorus 310mg.

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Quick Diabetic-Friendly Pasta Recipes

Article / Updated 06-14-2018

Traditional pasta dishes are high in carbohydrate and often contain high-fat ingredients, but if you have diabetes, you don’t have to take pasta off the table completely. The recipes here are great, healthier alternatives to heavy pasta dishes. Making a few simple changes to your average pasta dish can transform it into a balanced and nutritious meal. For example, using whole-wheat pasta instead of regular pasta can increase the dish’s fiber content, and adding nonstarchy vegetables to a recipe is a great way to make it hearty and flavorful without a lot of extra carbohydrate. The recipes in this chapter take advantage of these and other healthy changes to bring you diabetes-friendly pasta dishes that everyone will love! People with diabetes can still eat all kinds of foods. The key is moderation! So, if you’re craving a favorite dish or a rich dessert, it’s okay to indulge once in a while. Just make sure you control your portion sizes and account for the dish in your diabetes meal plan. It’s probably best to save these treats for special occasions, but it’s important to enjoy the foods you love. Eggplant Lasagna Preparation time: About 15 minutes Cook time: 1 hr 20 minutes Servings: 6 Serving size: 1 (4-1/2-inch) square Ingredients 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil, divided 1-3/4 cups chopped onion 2 medium garlic cloves, minced One 14.5-ounce can no-salt-added diced tomatoes, undrained 5 tablespoons no-salt-added tomato paste 1/2 cup water 2 tablespoons freshly chopped parsley 1 teaspoon finely chopped fresh oregano 4 tablespoons finely chopped fresh basil Freshly ground black pepper 1 large (1-1/2-pound) eggplant, peeled and sliced into 1/4-inch slices 1 cup shredded reduced-fat mozzarella cheese 1 cup nonfat ricotta 4 tablespoons freshly grated Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese Directions Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Coat a large skillet with 1/2 tablespoon of the olive oil. Add the onion and garlic, and sauté over low heat until the onion is tender, about 6 minutes. Stir in the tomatoes, tomato paste, water, parsley, oregano, basil, and pepper. Bring the mixture to a boil. Reduce the heat and simmer, covered, for 30 minutes, stirring occasionally. To steam the eggplant slices, place 1 inch of water in a large pot. Arrange the eggplant slices on a steamer, cover the pot, and steam until the eggplant is tender, about 5 minutes. Do not overcook. In a medium bowl, combine the mozzarella and ricotta cheese together, and set aside. Coat a 13-x-9-x-2-inch baking pan with the remaining 1/2 tablespoon olive oil, and place half of the eggplant in the pan. Top the eggplant with half of the cheese mixture and half of the sauce, and sprinkle with half of the Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese. Repeat. Bake at 350 degrees F for 30–35 minutes and serve hot. This hearty vegetarian entree can be made ahead and frozen. Per serving: Choices/Exchanges 4 Nonstarchy Vegetable, 1 Lean Protein, 1 Fat; Calories 180 (from Fat 60); Fat 7g (Saturated 3.1g, Trans 0.0g); Cholesterol 25mg; Sodium 220mg; Potassium 530mg; Total Carbohydrate 20g (Dietary Fiber 4g; Sugars 10g); Protein 14g; Phosphorus 240mg. Vegetable Lo Mein Preparation time: About 15 minutes Cook time: 10 minutes Servings: 8 Serving size: 1 cup Ingredients 1 cup plus 2 tablespoons low-sodium chicken broth 2 garlic cloves, minced 1/4 cup minced scallions 2 teaspoons grated fresh ginger 2 carrots, peeled and cut into 1/4-inch slices 3 celery stalks, cut on the diagonal into 1/4-inch slices 1/2 cup sliced mushrooms 1-1/2 cups broccoli florets 2 tablespoons dry sherry 1 tablespoon light soy sauce 1 teaspoon sesame oil 1 tablespoon cornstarch 1/2 pound cooked whole-wheat vermicelli Directions 1. In a large skillet or wok, heat 2 tablespoons of the broth. Add the garlic, scallions, and ginger, and sauté for 30 seconds. 2. Add the carrots, celery, and mushrooms, and sauté for 5 minutes. Add the broccoli and 1/2 cup of the broth, cover, and steam for 5 minutes. 3. In a small bowl, combine the remaining 1/2 cup of broth with the sherry, soy sauce, and sesame oil. Add the cornstarch and mix well. 4. Remove the cover and add the cornstarch mixture. Cook for 1 minute more until the mixture thickens. Toss in the cooked noodles and mix well. Serve. Swap out vermicelli for rice for a delicious Asian stir-fry. Per serving: Choices/Exchanges 1/2 Starch, 1 Nonstarchy Vegetable; Calories 80 (from Fat 10); Fat 1g (Saturated 0.2g, Trans 0.0g); Cholesterol 0mg; Sodium 120mg; Potassium 240mg; Total Carbohydrate 13g (Dietary Fiber 2g; Sugars 2g); Protein 4g; Phosphorus 75mg.

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Quick Diabetic-Friendly Soup and Stew Recipes

Article / Updated 06-14-2018

Most important for people with diabetes, homemade soups are a tasty vehicle for incorporating more vegetables, legumes, and lean proteins into your meal plan without a lot of added fat or sodium. The recipes here use fresh produce and low-sodium products such as broth and canned tomatoes to keep these soups diabetes friendly. But remember: Healthy doesn’t mean boring! Whether you’re looking for a heartier dish (like English Beef Stew or Spicy Turkey Chili), or a more delicate, refreshing soup (like Cream of Carrot Soup), there’s a recipe for you! Got a fridge full of leftovers? Soup recipes are a great way to use the rest of those baby carrots before they go bad, or get rid of that takeout container of brown rice in the fridge. Soup and stew recipes can be varied easily to use ingredients you have on hand. Just make sure to account for those ingredients in your meal plan. Cream of Carrot Soup Preparation time: About 5 minutes Cook time: 15 minutes Servings: 4 Serving size: 1 cup Ingredients 1 cup plus 2 tablespoons low-sodium chicken broth, divided 3 tablespoons finely chopped shallots or onions 2 tablespoons flour 2 cups fat-free milk, scalded and hot 1 teaspoon cinnamon 1 cup cooked, pureed carrots Freshly ground black pepper Directions In a stockpot, heat 2 tablespoons of the broth over medium heat. Add the shallots and cook until limp. Sprinkle the shallots with the flour and cook 2–3 minutes. Pour in the hot milk and cook until the mixture thickens. Add the remaining ingredients. Bring almost to a boil, stirring often, and cook for approximately 5 minutes. Add pepper to taste. Parsnips and sweet potatoes could also be prepared this way. This smooth, tasty soup is great to serve for special luncheons. Per serving: Choices/Exchanges 1/2 Fat-Free Milk, 1 Nonstarchy Vegetable; Calories 90 (from Fat 0); Fat 0g (Saturated 0.1g, Trans 0.0g); Cholesterol 0mg; Sodium 110mg; Potassium 390mg, Total Carbohydrate 14g (Dietary Fiber 2g; Sugars 9g); Protein 7g; Phosphorus 165mg. English Beef Stew Preparation time: About 10 minutes Cook time: 2-1/2 hours Servings: 8 Serving size: 1 cup Ingredients 2 pounds lean beef for stew, cut into large chunks 1-1/2 tablespoons flour 2 tablespoons canola oil 2 garlic cloves, chopped 2 cups boiling water 1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce 1/16 teaspoon salt 1/16 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 1 large yellow onion, quartered 4 large carrots, peeled and quartered 3 medium potatoes, white or russet, cut into 1-inch cubes 1 cup low-sodium canned stewed tomatoes Directions Roll the beef cubes in the flour. In a large saucepan over medium heat, heat the canola oil. Add the beef and sauté a few pieces of beef at a time. When all the beef has been browned, add the garlic and stir. Pour the boiling water to the pan. Add the Worcestershire sauce, salt, and pepper. Lower the heat, cover, and let simmer for 1-1/2–2 hours or until the meat is very tender. Add the onion, carrots, potatoes, and tomatoes. Let simmer about 30 minutes until all vegetables are just tender. Transfer to a serving bowl and serve. Per serving: Choices/Exchanges 1 Starch, 1 Nonstarchy Vegetable, 3 Lean Protein, 1/2 Fat; Calories 260 (from Fat 70); Fat 8g (Saturated 2.2g, Trans 0.3g); Cholesterol 60mg; Sodium 120mg; Potassium 740mg; Total Carbohydrate 21g (Dietary Fiber 3g; Sugars 5g); Protein 24g; Phosphorus 245mg. Spicy Turkey Chili Preparation time: About 10 minutes Cook time: 50 minutes Servings: 6 Serving size: 1 cup Ingredients 2 onions, chopped 2 garlic cloves, minced 1/2 cup chopped green bell pepper 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil 1 pound lean ground turkey breast meat 2 cups cooked (not canned) kidney or pinto beans 2 cups canned tomatoes with liquid 1 cup low-sodium chicken broth 2 tablespoon chili powder 2 teaspoons cumin Freshly ground black pepper Directions In a large saucepan, sauté the onion, garlic, and green pepper in the oil for 10 minutes. Add the turkey, and sauté until the turkey is cooked, about 5–10 minutes. Drain any fat away. Add the remaining ingredients, bring to a boil, lower the heat, and simmer uncovered for 30 minutes. Add additional chili powder if you like your chili extra spicy. This chili tastes great with fresh-baked corn muffins. Per serving: Choices/Exchanges 1 Starch, 2 Nonstarchy Vegetable, 3 Lean Protein; Calories 240 (from Fat 45); Fat 5g (Saturated 0.9g, Trans 0.0g); Cholesterol 45mg; Sodium 200mg; Potassium 790mg; Total Carbohydrate 24g (Dietary Fiber 7g; Sugars 5g); Protein 27g; Phosphorus 310mg. Manhattan Clam Chowder Preparation time: About 10 minutes Cook time: 1-1/2 minutes Servings: 8 Serving size: 1 cup Ingredients 3 medium carrots, peeled and coarsely chopped 3 large white or russet potatoes, peeled and coarsely chopped 4 celery stalks, coarsely chopped 2-1/2 cups minced clams, drained 2 cups canned tomatoes, slightly crushed 1/2 teaspoon dried thyme or 1 teaspoon minced fresh thyme Freshly ground black pepper Directions Add all the ingredients to a large stockpot. Cover and let simmer for 1-1/2 hours. Taste and add a dash of salt if needed. Serve hot. Try serving this chunky chowder with hot sourdough bread for a great flavor and texture combo. Per serving: Choices/Exchanges 1 Starch, 1 Nonstarchy Vegetable, 1 Lean Protein; Calories 150 (from Fat 10); Fat 1g (Saturated 0.1g, Trans 0.0g); Cholesterol 35mg; Sodium 180mg; Potassium 790mg; Total Carbohydrate 21g (Dietary Fiber 3g; Sugars 4g); Protein 15g; Phosphorus 220mg.

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Can Diabetics Eat Fruit?

Article / Updated 06-14-2018

Fruits are a healthy food choice for people with diabetes. Fruits contain carbohydrate and affect your blood glucose, so be sure to account for them in your meal plan. But they’re also full of fiber and nutrients that a health body needs. If you have a sweet tooth, great news: A serving of fruit is a wonderful alternative to heavier desserts and sugary treats. The best fruit choices for people with diabetes are fresh, canned, and frozen fruits without added sugars. When shopping for canned fruits, look for options that are packed in juice or light syrup. Here are just a few examples of the many fruits you can enjoy: Apples Apricots Avocados Bananas Blackberries Blueberries Cherries Grapefruit Grapes Kiwi Mangoes Melon (cantaloupe, honeydew, watermelon) Oranges Papaya Peaches Pears Pineapple Plums Raspberries Strawberries Dried fruits such as cranberries, dates, figs, and raisins are another option for people with diabetes. They make a handy and tasty snack. But dried fruits are usually high in sugar, so the serving sizes are small. Dried fruits are just concentrated versions of fresh fruits — think about the size of a raisin compared to a grape, or a prune compared to a plum. So, watch your portions if you choose to add dried fruits to your diet.

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