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SAT

By: Ron Woldoff Published: 08-29-2016

1,001 SAT practice questions—at your fingertips

Setting your sights on college? Ready to take the SAT? Get a head start on a high score with 1,001 SAT Practice Questions For Dummies. Inside, you'll find 1,001 practice questions on everything you'll encounter on the SAT. All of the question types and formats are here, so you can study, practice, and increase your chances of scoring higher on the big day.

Whether you're cramming on the go, pulling an all-nighter, or making useful time of study hall, 1,001 SAT Practice Questions For Dummies gives you the practice you need to prepare for that all-important exam day. So roll up your sleeves, put your nose to the grindstone, and get the confidence to perform your very best.

  • Includes free, one-year access to practice questions online
  • Offers 1,001 SAT practice questions—from easy to hard
  • Tracks your progress, so you can see where you need more help and create your own question sets
  • Provides detailed, step-by-step answers and explanations for every question

Approach the SAT with confidence. Everything you need to succeed is a page away.

Articles From SAT

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38 results
38 results
SAT Writing Practice Problems: Parallel Structure, Agreement, and Tense

Article / Updated 01-29-2017

The SAT Writing and Language section contains several questions related to parallel structure—that is, whether the parts of a sentence doing a particular job are grammatically consistent. For example, a subject and verb must agree by both being single or plural, and verb tense must also be consistent. In the following practice questions, you have to decide whether the verbs are agreeing in number with the nouns they describe. Practice questions Question 1 is based on the following information. The following passage is an excerpt from A Practical Guide to Scientific Data Analysis, by David J. Livingstone (Wiley-Blackwell). Perhaps one of the most familiar concepts in statistics (1) are the frequency distributions. A plot of a frequency distribution is shown in Figure 2.1, where the ordinate (y-axis) represents the number of occurrences of a particular value of a variable given by the scales of the abscissa (x-axis). Regarding the underlined passage A. NO CHANGE B. are frequency distributions C. is the frequency distribution D. DELETE the underlined portion Question 2 is based on the following information. The following passage is an excerpt from Biology For Dummies, by Rene Fester Kratz, PhD, and Donna Rae Siegfried (Wiley). In the inner membranes of the mitochondria in your cells, hundreds of little cellular machines are busily working to transfer energy from food molecules to ATP. The cellular machines are called electron transport chains, and they're made of a team of proteins that (2) is seated in the membranes transferring energy and electrons throughout the machines. Regarding the underlined passage A. NO CHANGE B. sits C. has been seated D. are seated Answers and explanations The correct answer is Choice (C). "One . . . is" is correct. The correct answer is Choice (B). "A team . . . sits" is correct and more concise than "A team . . . that is seated."

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SAT Writing Practice Problems: Logic and Organization

Article / Updated 01-29-2017

Some questions on the SAT Writing and Language section will test your logic and organizational skills. You will have to decide whether a passage has expressed the idea in the best way possible. In the following practice questions, you first have to select the best sentence that links two other sentences, and then decide on the best location to insert a supporting quotation. Practice questions Questions 1 and 2 are based on the following information. The following passage is an excerpt from Sherlock Holmes For Dummies, by Steven Doyle and David A. Crowder (Wiley). The public was wildly enthusiastic about Sherlock Holmes, but one man didn't share that feeling. Incredibly, it was Arthur Conan Doyle himself. He had greater ambitions in mind as a writer; he believed he'd make his mark in literature by writing historical novels. (1) Doyle began to see the detective as an impediment to his work instead of as a part of it. . . . (A) Doyle never realized how popular Sherlock Holmes was until he killed him. (B) "I was amazed at the concern expressed by the public," he wrote in his autobiography. (C) "They say a man is never properly appreciated until he is dead, and the general protest against my summary execution of Holmes taught me how many and numerous were his friends." At this point, the authors want to add a sentence to set up the public's response to Holmes's death later in the passage. Which choice most effectively does this? A. The public enjoyed both Sherlock Holmes and Professor Moriarty, the supervillain who would take his life. B. Reichenback Falls was soon to occupy a place in Holmes's history and the public mind. C. The public, however, wanted more Sherlock Holmes. D. Though Doyle enjoyed writing about Sherlock Holmes, he wanted something more. The authors are considering adding this quote from Doyle as an example of the public's response to Holmes's death: "'You Brute!' was the beginning of the letter which one lady sent me. . . ." Where in this paragraph should this sentence be added? A. Before Sentence A B. After Sentence A C. After Sentence B D. After Sentence C, continuing the quote from Doyle Answers and explanations The correct answer is Choice (C). This sentence clearly describes what the public wants, which sets up the public's reaction later in the passage. Choice (A) is wrong because it doesn't state that the public wanted more, simply that they enjoyed the character. It's the wanting more that caused the public reaction. The correct answer is Choice (D). After Sentence C, continuing the quote from Doyle The specific example properly follows Doyle's description of the general protest.

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SAT Writing Practice Problems: Vocabulary in Context

Article / Updated 01-29-2017

You'll encounter a few vocabulary-in-context questions in the SAT Writing and Language section. As in the following practice questions, you'll have to decide on the best word to use based on the surrounding text. Practice questions Question 1 is based on the following information. The following text is an excerpt from Dendroclimatic Studies: Tree Growth and Climate Change in Northern Forests, by Rosanne D'Arrigo, Nicole Davi, Gordon Jacoby, Rob Wilson, and Greg Wiles (Wiley-Blackwell). The research described (1) here in adheres to the basic principles of dendrochronology, as outlined in introductory and general texts by Stokes and Smiley (1968), Fritts (1976), Schwein- gruber (1988), Cook and Kairiukstis (1990), Speer (2012), and others. Regarding the underlined passage A. NO CHANGE B. herein C. heron D. heroine Question 2 is based on the following information. The following passage is an excerpt from Sherlock Holmes For Dummies, by Steven Doyle and David A. Crowder (Wiley). In the timeline of the Sherlockian (2) cannon, Sherlock Holmes was officially dead from 1891 to 1894. In reality, ten years passed before Doyle decided to officially reverse the death sentence and bring Holmes back to life. Regarding the underlined word A. NO CHANGE B. canon C. maxim D. axiom Answers and explanations The correct answer is Choice (B). As used, herein is one word meaning "here in this writing." The other answer choices don't fit: here in isn't the proper use of words in this context, heron is a large bird, and heroine is a female hero. The correct answer is Choice (B). The definition of canon is "a collection of sacred books." The other words have meanings that don't fit: cannon is a weapon, and maxim and axiom both refer to a truth that is self-evident.

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SAT Writing Practice Problems: Grammar and Punctuation

Article / Updated 01-29-2017

As you'd expect, the SAT Writing and Language section contains several questions that test your knowledge of grammar or punctuation. For each of the following practice questions, you need to read a brief passage, and then decide whether an underlined word or phrase is correct. Practice questions Question 1 is based on the following information. The following passage is an excerpt from 35 Seasons of U.S. Antarctic Meteorites (1976–2010): A Pictorial Guide to the Collection, edited by Kevin Righter, Catherine Corrigan, Timothy McCoy, and Ralph Harvey (Wiley-Blackwell). In the audience sat William A. Cassidy, of the University of Pittsburgh. Bill Cassidy wrote later that, on hearing that report, a comic-strip light-bulb appeared in his mind with a message reading: "Meteorites are concentrated on the ice!" Cassidy expected the whole room to be excited, but looking around he found the audience looking as comatose and glassy-eyed (1) that audiences sometimes do. I was chairing the session that evening, but I was much too preoccupied with keeping the speakers more or less on schedule to be having any eureka experiences. Regarding the underlined word A. NO CHANGE B. as C. the way D. which Question 2 is based on the following information. The following passage is an excerpt from Sherlock Holmes For Dummies, by Steven Doyle and David A. Crowder (Wiley). The public was wildly enthusiastic about Sherlock Holmes, but one man didn't share that feeling. Incredibly, it was Arthur Conan Doyle himself. He had greater ambitions in mind as a (2) writer but he believed he'd make his mark in literature by writing historical novels. Doyle began to see the detective as an impediment to his work instead of as a part of it. Regarding the underlined passage A. NO CHANGE B. writer; C. writer, D. writer and Answers and explanations The correct answer is Choice (B). "Looking as comatose and glassy-eyed as audiences sometimes do" is correct. The correct answer is Choice (B). The semicolon correctly joins the two complete sentences.

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SAT Reading Practice Problems: Interpreting Visual Elements

Article / Updated 01-29-2017

Some questions on the SAT Reading Comprehension exam will ask you to interpret a chart, graph, or diagram—usually in passages dealing with science and history. The following practice questions are based on a figure extracted from a scientific passage. Practice questions Questions 1 and 2 are based on the following information. Study the figure and answer each question based on information stated or implied in the figure. According to the figure, the number of volcanic eruptions in 2050 will probably be A. close to 80 B. close to 60 C. close to 40 D. close to 20 What is a drawback of the data collected in the figure? A. Certain islands may not have been included each year. B. Earthquakes may have been counted as eruptions. C. The definition of an eruption has changed. D. Past eruptions may not have been reported. Answers and explanations The correct answer is Choice (A). Continue the line upward and to the right. The point that is above 2050 is to the right of where the number of eruptions would show 80. The correct answer is Choice (D). Although it's possible that the number of eruptions has increased almost each year, it's not likely that the number of eruptions was close to zero before 1800.

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SAT Reading Practice Problems: Vocabulary in Context

Article / Updated 01-29-2017

Vocabulary-in-context questions are usually pretty straightforward on the SAT Reading Comprehension exam. As in the following practice questions, you read a passage, and then identify the meaning of a selected word in the context of the passage. Note: the following are excerpts from passages; actual passages are much typically longer. Practice questions Read the passage and answer Question 1 based on information stated or implied in the passage. The following passage is an excerpt from Introverts For Dummies, by Joan Pastor, PhD (Wiley). If your child is far more advanced than other kids her age, her school may suggest moving her up an extra grade. But be aware that gifted innies who are way ahead of the pack intellectually may still need to be around same-age peers to learn social skills. So if this option comes up, consider your child's overall social and intellectual development and ask yourself if she's truly ready to study — and play — with older children. As used here, "pack" most nearly means A. a group of dogs B. a group of kids C. prepare for a trip D. worn on one's back Read the passage and answer Question 2 based on information stated or implied in the passage. The following passage is an excerpt from Clinical Anatomy For Dummies, by David Terfera, PhD, and Shereen Jegtvig, DC, MS (Wiley). Just past the point where the nerve roots merge, each spinal nerve divides into a posterior ramus and an anterior ramus. The posterior ramus innervates the skin and deep back muscles, and the anterior ramus innervates the rest of the trunk and the extremities. The rami (like the spinal nerves) are mixed (contains both sensory and motor fibers). The recurrent meningeal branch of the spinal nerves innervates most of the vertebral column; however, the zygapophysial joints are innervated by the medial branches of the posterior rami. In context, the word "mixed" means A. diverse B. combined C. assorted D. hybrid Answers and explanations The correct answer is Choice (B). The child is "ahead of the pack" intellectually because she's more gifted than the other kids. The correct answer is Choice (B). The word refers to the rami containing both (a combination of) sensory and motor fibers. Choice (A) is wrong because diverse refers to the inclusion of all facets. Choice (C) is wrong because assorted refers to a variety. Choice (D) is wrong because hybrid refers to a single item that is a result of two.

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SAT Reading Practice Problems: Inference Questions

Article / Updated 01-29-2017

The SAT Reading Comprehension exam often contains inference questions, where you make certain conclusions based on what you've read. After reading the following passage, you'll have to infer the author's opinion about a topic discussed in the passage, and also identify the sentence from the passage that best explains your conclusion. Reading Passage Questions 1 and 2 are based on the following information. Read the passage and answer each question based on information stated or implied in the passage. The following passage is an excerpt from GRE For Dummies, 8th Edition, by Ron Woldoff and Joe Kraynak (Wiley). A key study has shown that the organic matter content of a soil can be altered to a depth of 10 cm or more by intense campfire heat. As much as 90 percent of the original organic matter may be oxidized in the top 1.3 cm of soil. In the surface 10 cm, the loss of organic matter may reach 50 percent if the soil is dry and the temperature exceeds 250 degrees. (1) The loss of organic matter reduces soil fertility and water-holding capacity and renders the soil more susceptible to compaction and erosion. Sandy soils attain higher temperatures and retain heat longer than clay soils under similar fuel, moisture, and weather conditions. From this standpoint, it is desirable to locate campgrounds in an area with loam or clay-loam soil. Sandy soils are less susceptible to compaction damage, however, and are more desirable for campgrounds from this standpoint. (2) A water-repellent layer can be created in a soil by the heat from the campfire. This condition was noted only in sandy soils where the temperature remained below 350 degrees during the campfire burn. Campfires often produce temperatures above this level. By comparison, forest fires are a shorter-duration event, and soil temperatures produced are more likely to create water repellency-inducing conditions. The greater extent of forest fires makes them a more serious threat than campfires in terms of causing soil-water repellency. If the soil remained moist for the duration of the campfire, the increased heat capacity of the soil and heat of water vaporization kept the soil temperature below 100 degrees. (3) At this temperature, little loss of organic matter occurred, and no water repellency was created. For areas where the soil remains very moist, campfires probably have little effect on the soil properties. Studies show that softwood fuels burn faster and produce less heat flow into the soil than do hardwood fuels under the same conditions. Elm and mesquite were the hottest burning and longest lasting fuels tested. In areas where some choice of fuels is available, the use of softwood fuels should be encouraged in an effort to minimize the effect of campfires on soil properties. By restricting the fire site to the same area, the effects of campfires on the soil in a campground can be lessened, even if permanent concrete fireplaces are not installed. In this manner, any harmful effects are restricted to a minimum area. If campfires are allowed to be located at random by the user, the harmful effects tend to be spread over a larger part of the campground. The placement of a stone fire ring in the chosen location is one way to accomplish the objective. (4) These data support the decision to install permanent fireplaces in many areas and to restrict the use of campfires elsewhere in the park. This eliminates the harmful effects of campfires on the soil and allows the campground to be located on sandy soil with low compactibility and good drainage. Practice questions The authors would be most likely to agree with which of the following? A. Campfires should be banned as destructive to campground soil. B. Organic matter decreases soil erosion. C. Clay-loam soil is preferable to sandy soil for campsites. D. Campfires will not burn in areas with moist soil. Which sentence best supports the answer to the preceding question? A. Sentence 1 ("The loss . . . erosion.") B. Sentence 2 ("A water-repellent . . . campfire.") C. Sentence 3 ("At this temperature . . . created.") D. Sentence 4 ("These data . . . the park.") Answers and explanations The correct answer is Choice (B). The last sentence of the first paragraph states that the loss of organic matter reduces water-holding capacity and renders the soil more susceptible to erosion. Choice (A) is wrong because the authors support controlling campfires, not banning them. Choice (C) is wrong because the discussion is on the campfires, not the campsites. Choice (D) is wrong because campfires do burn on moist soils. The correct answer is Choice (A). This sentence states that the loss of organic matter makes the soil more susceptible to erosion.

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SAT Reading Practice Problem—Main Theme of a Passage

Article / Updated 01-29-2017

The SAT Reading Comprehension exam contains several passages that you will have to read. In some cases, you will have to determine the main or general theme that the writer is trying to convey. After you read the following passage, the practice questions will ask you to identify the main theme, and also point out which sentence best expresses this idea. Reading Passage Questions 1 and 2 are based on the following information. Read the passage and answer each question based on information stated or implied in the passage. The following passage is an excerpt from Introverts For Dummies, by Joan Pastor, PhD (Wiley). Fifty percent of gifted kids are introverts. And three-quarters of "supergifted" kids — children with IQs above 160 — are innies. (1) You'd think these brilliant kids would flourish in school, but frequently, they don't. Instead, they may spend hours bored to tears as their teachers go over material they already know. They may also get into trouble for ignoring classroom assignments and pursuing their own interests instead. Worse yet, these children's remarkable talents often go undeveloped. That's why smart parents often seek better options for them. If you think your introverted child is gifted, ask for a professional evaluation by a psychologist. If testing confirms your opinion, ask your school what services it offers for gifted children. (2) Some schools have excellent programs for very bright children, while others fall far short. If your child's current school can't fully meet her needs, explore other options. (3) Some communities have magnet schools specifically designed for gifted children. Your child may also enjoy a math, science, or arts camp during the summer. And museums, nature centers, and recreation centers frequently offer programs that will excite your innie. Additionally, consider supplementing your child's education with online courses on her favorite topics. Often, these courses allow students to learn at their own pace, so instead of twiddling her thumbs while she waits for her classmates to catch up, your child can go full steam ahead. The Khan Academy (www.khanacademy.org) and other free online educational sites can also be great resources. If your child is far more advanced than other kids her age, (4) her school may suggest moving her up an extra grade. But be aware that gifted innies who are way ahead of the pack intellectually may still need to be around same-age peers to learn social skills. So if this option comes up, consider your child's overall social and intellectual development and ask yourself if she's truly ready to study — and play — with older children. Another issue to keep in mind is that the higher a child's IQ is, the greater the chances are that the child will also have a learning disability. If your child is gifted but still struggles in some areas, make sure you explore this possibility. Practice questions The main theme that Pastor describes in the passage is that gifted, introverted children A. could excel in the academic setting provided by almost any school B. should avoid online distractions from true academic discourse C. could benefit from advancing an extra grade to be with peers at their intellectual level D. could perform extremely well in the right academic setting Which choice provides the best evidence for the answer to the preceding question? A. Sentence 1 ("You'd think . . . they don't.") B. Sentence 2 ("Some schools . . . fall far short.") C. Sentence 3 ("Some communities . . . children.") D. Sentence 4 ("her school . . . grade.") Answers and explanations The correct answer is Choice (D). The passage recommends seeking schools that have programs for gifted children. Choice (A) is wrong because some schools fall short. Choice (B) is wrong because the passage recommends Khan Academy. Choice (C) is wrong because the passage recommends children stay with their own age group and avoid advancing a grade unless they're emotionally ready. The correct answer is Choice (C). You're looking for a sentence that supports the idea that gifted children could perform extremely well in the right academic setting. The correct answer tells you that some schools are specifically designed for gifted children.

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SAT Math Problems: Using the Standard Circle Equation

Article / Updated 01-29-2017

If you encounter a question on the SAT Math exam that gives you the equation of a circle, you'll probably need to convert that equation to the standard circle equation. The following practice questions give you the equation of a circle and ask you to find its radius and center. Practice questions Questions 1 and 2 are based on the following information. The equation of a circle in the xy-plane is shown here: x2 + y2 + 6x – 4y = –9 What is the radius of the circle? A. 1 B. 2 C. 3 D. 4 What are the (x, y) coordinates of the center? A. (–3, 2) B. (–2, 3) C. (3, –2) D. (2, –3) Answers and explanations The correct answer is Choice (B). First convert the equation to the standard circle equation: where r is the radius of the circle. From the original equation, start by moving the x's and y's together: The x2 + 6x tells you that (x + 3)2 is part of the equation. FOIL this out to x2 + 6x + 9. However, the x2 + 6x is by itself on the left, so add 9 to both sides of the equation: Also, y2 – 4y tells you that (y – 2)2 is part of the equation, which FOILs out to y2 – 4y + 4. However, the y2 – 4y is by itself on the left, so add 4 to both sides, like this: To convert the circle to its standard form, factor x2 + 6x + 9 into (x + 3)2 and y2 – 4y + 4 into (y – 2)2, like this: Now the circle is in its familiar form, and r2 = 4, so r = 2. The correct answer is Choice (A). First convert the equation to the standard circle equation: where h is the x-coordinate and k is the y-coordinate of the center of the circle. From the original equation, start by moving the x's and y's together: The x2 + 6x tells you that (x + 3)2 is part of the equation. FOIL this out to x2 + 6x + 9. However, the x2 + 6x is by itself on the left, so add 9 to both sides of the equation: Also, y2 – 4y tells you that (y – 2)2 is part of the equation, which FOILs out to y2 – 4y + 4. However, the y2 – 4y is by itself on the left, so add 4 to both sides, like this: To convert the circle to its standard form, factor x2 + 6x + 9 into (x + 3)2 and y2 – 4y + 4 into (y – 2)2, like this: Now the circle is in its familiar form, where h = –3 and k = 2.

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SAT Math Word Problems: Present and Future Values

Article / Updated 01-29-2017

You are almost guaranteed to encounter a word problem on the SAT Math exam that deals with banking; for example, you may be asked to determine the present value of an account based on its future value, or vice versa. The following practice questions require you to build equations to calculate the present value of a savings account. Practice questions The money in a savings account increases 0.6% each month. Which of the following equations shows the present value, PV, of the money in the account based on the future value, FV, after a period of m months? The money in a savings account increases by an annual interest rate of i percent. If the interest accrues monthly, which of the following equations shows the present value, PV, of the money in the account based on the future value, FV, after a period of m months? Answers and explanations The correct answer is Choice (B). Each month, the present value, PV, increases 0.6%, meaning that it's multiplied by 1.006 (because 100% + 0.6% = 100.6%). In the equation, m represents the number of times that the present value is multiplied by 1.006. This gives you the following equation: FV = PV(1.006)m Divide both sides by (1.006)m to get the value of PV. The correct answer is Choice (D). If the annual interest rate is i percent, then it's i/100. Divide this by 12 for a monthly interest rate of i/1,200. Each month, the present value, PV, increases by i/1,200, meaning that it's multiplied by In the equation, m represents the number of times that the present value is multiplied by

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