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GRE

By: The Experts at Dummies Published: 05-26-2015

The GRE General Test is accepted at more than 3,200 graduate and business schools as well as departments and divisions within these schools. 1,001 GRE Practice Questions For Dummies will focus on question types from the Verbal Reasoning and Quantitative Reasoning sections of the GRE and will provide prompts and guidance for improving skills on the Analytical Writing section of the exam. Every practice problem will include answers and explanations. Every step of every solution will be shown, and the answer explanations will include detailed narratives to walk readers through solving each practice problem. Beyond the Book: With the book purchase, readers will also get access to practice problems online. This content features: 500 practice questions On-the-go access from smart phones, computers, and tablets Customizable practice sets for self-directed study Practice questions categorized as easy, medium, or hard One-year subscription with book purchase.

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1,001 GRE Practice Questions For Dummies Cheat Sheet

Cheat Sheet / Updated 03-27-2016

Getting into the graduate school of your choice is a whole lot easier if you score well on the GRE (Graduate Record Examination). This collection of GRE test-taking tips and key information can help get prepared so that you can perform well on the test, get into graduate school, and achieve your career goals.

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What to Bring and Leave at Home on GRE Test Day

Article / Updated 03-26-2016

The GRE proctors are strict about the items you’re allowed to bring into the testing center. Make sure you come prepared on test day by bringing all of these things: ETS authorization voucher: Bring the verification that you’ve signed up for the exam on this day, at this time, here at this location. If the testing center makes a mistake and loses your reservation, you need to show that you are actually reserved for this time. Comfortable clothes: Testing centers tend to crank up the A/C. The last thing you want is to be shivering during the exam. Wear two layers of long-sleeve clothing, and you can always remove one if you’re warm. Map or directions to the testing center: The GRE is intense enough; let the drive there be easy, especially if your test is in the morning, putting your drive in the midst of rush-hour traffic. You may also want to scope out the area ahead of time and find parking. Photo ID: The GRE testing centers sport some tight security. You may not be allowed to take the test unless you can verify who you are. Water and a snack: Your break is 10 minutes, some of which is spent checking back in when you return from the restroom. You don’t have time to go grab something. Bring water and a snack so you can use your precious few minutes getting refreshed. Some testing centers give you access to your locker during your break, and some don’t. But the proctors always tell you where you can leave your food and water. The GRE proctors are also strict about the items you can’t bring into the testing center. If you have any of these items with you, you’ll be asked to keep them in your locker while taking the exam: Books and study notes: You’re not allowed to use books or notes, so why bring them? Leave them in your car or at home. A student almost had his scores cancelled because he took a text book out of his locker during his break. Fortunately, he didn’t open the book, so he was allowed to keep his scores, which was good, because he had scored well. Cellphone and wallet: Your cellphone and wallet stay in the locker while you’re taking the GRE. Calculator: If you bring a calculator, it too will stay in the locker. The GRE provides a computerized calculator for the Quantitative Reasoning sections, so you don’t need to bring one. Your own scratch paper: The proctors will take away anything you bring and provide their own scratch paper for you to use.

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Your GRE Study Plan

Article / Updated 03-26-2016

Preparing for the GRE can be overwhelming, especially if you haven’t touched the math for years or are rusty with the verbal. It may seem that there’s too much to study, and you’ll never get through it all. The good news is that you mastered these topics at one time: You graduated high school and completed college. You are merely returning to a familiar path. The other good news is that the GRE has a specific, limited scope of material that it asks about. For example, on the quantitative side, you’ll see plenty of square roots but never a cube root. The math questions you see in 1,001 GRE Practice Questions For Dummies are based exactly on this scope of material. Learn to answer these math questions, and you’ll be prepared for the real thing. On the verbal side, the GRE uses many of the same vocab words over again. Learn those words in 1,001 GRE Practice Questions For Dummies and you’ll know a lot of the words on the exam. You won’t know them all, but you’ll know enough to do well.

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What to Expect When You Take the GRE

Article / Updated 03-26-2016

The GRE is a computerized test taken at a local testing center. Other test-takers may also be there, working on the GRE or a different exam, but you’ll be in a booth, immersed in your own test. Lasting up to four hours, the GRE is a marathon, challenging your stamina as well as your skills. The following table outlines the sections of the GRE, including the number of questions and time limits of each. The essays are always first, but the other sections can be in any order. Section Number of Questions Time Allotted Analyze an Issue 1 essay 30 minutes Analyze an Argument 1 essay 30 minutes Verbal Reasoning 20 questions 30 minutes Break — 10 minutes Quantitative Reasoning 20 questions 35 minutes Verbal Reasoning 20 questions 30 minutes Quantitative Reasoning 20 questions 35 minutes Unscored Verbal or Quantitative Reasoning 20 questions 30 or 35 minutes Possible Unscored Research Section 20 questions 30 or 35 minutes Total testing time About 4 hours

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Algebra Problems on the GRE — Strategies and Practice Questions

Article / Updated 03-26-2016

The algebra problems on the GRE Math test may include linear equations, coordinate geometry, and quadratic equations. If you're fresh out of math class, you'll probably be fine going through these quickly. If it's been a few years since you've done any algebra, you may want to work the questions carefully. Students who take the GRE tend to make the following mistakes: Mistakes in simple math, such as not placing the decimal point correctly Mistakes in working the problem, such as multiplying exponents when they should be adding them Not knowing how to work a certain math problem, such as setting up an equation Here are some practice questions for you to try. Practice questions Using the following figure, find the equation of the line in this diagram. The nth term of a sequence is given by Find the term of the sequence that is equal to 4. A. The third term B. The fifth term C. The seventh term D. The eighth term E. The tenth term Answers and explanations C. First, find the slope: Next, find the y-intercept, y-intercept = –4, for the line y = mx + b. The equation for this line is The correct answer is Choice (C). C. The seventh term This quadratic equation can be factored into (n – 7)(n + 3) = 0, which has solutions of n = 7 or n = –3. Because n can't be negative, n = 7. The correct answer is therefore Choice (C).

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Argument Analysis on the GRE — Strategies and Practice Questions

Article / Updated 03-26-2016

When you tackle an Argument Analysis question on the GRE, your job is to identify whether the author has done a sufficient job of presenting and supporting his position. Graduate schools expect you not only to read with understanding but also to scrutinize the information and argument presented and sort logic that is reasonable from logic that is not. Each Argument Analysis question consists of a short argument followed by one question and five answer choices. You may strengthen the argument, weaken the argument, or discern the roles of highlighted sentences within the argument. When you answer an Argument Analysis question, be prepared to Identify the premise and conclusion of the argument. Find the hidden assumption. Spot weaknesses in supporting details. Explore logical fallacies. Use the process of elimination. These passages use a lot of flawed logic, so watch out for arguments that do the following: Rely on circular reasoning, in which a premise supports itself Assume erroneous cause-and-effect arguments, where two independent events are described as one having caused the other Use sweeping generalizations, in which something that has an effect in one context will have the same effect in another The following sample passage and question will test your analytical skills. Sample passage Read the following passage and then answer the question. The organic food movement was designed to provide healthier food options without the use of pesticides or unnatural substances, such as growth hormones. The high prices of organic foods deter many people from being able to experience these positive attributes of food. Manufacturers say the cost of certifying their produce as organic is high. Part of this financial burden must fall to the consumers. If the government provided financial assistance to these producers, more people could lead healthier lives. Sample question Select the sentence that best supports the assumption of the argument. A. If the government provided financial assistance to these producers, more people could lead healthier lives. B. The organic food movement was designed to provide healthier food options without the use of pesticides or unnatural substances, such as growth hormones. C. Part of this financial burden must fall to the consumers. D. The high prices of organic foods deter many people from being able to experience these positive attributes of food. E. Manufacturers say the cost of certifying their produce as organic is high. Answer and explanation D. The high prices of organic foods deter many people from being able to experience these positive attributes of food. If more people were able to lead healthier lives by eating organically, and if that ability were supported by the government to lower the price of organic foods, then the only thing keeping people from eating organic foods is the price. Which sentence provides the best restatement of this idea? Choice (A) is the assumption (if the government provided financial assistance to these producers, more people could lead healthier lives), so it does not support itself. Choices (B), (C), and (E) all provide facts about the issue related to organic food consumption — the organic food movement was designed to provide healthier food options without the use of pesticides or unnatural substances, such as growth hormones; part of this financial burden must fall to the consumers; and manufacturers say the cost of certifying their produce as organic is high — but only Choice (D) gives the reason why these foods are not being consumed. Thus, Choice (D) provides the appropriate evidence to support the assumption.

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Geometry Problems on the GRE — Strategies and Practice Questions

Article / Updated 03-26-2016

The geometry problems on the GRE Math test may include basic shapes and 3-dimensional shapes. If you're fresh out of math class, you'll probably be fine going through these quickly. If it's been a few years since you've done any geometry, you may want to work these questions carefully. Students who take the GRE tend to make the following mistakes: Mistakes in interpreting the question, such as using the wrong line or angle measures Mistakes in working the problem, such as applying the wrong formula Not reading the question carefully, and missing what they must actually look for The following practice questions will test your skills at dealing with both a simple shape and a 3-dimensional shape. Practice questions Find the area. A. 17 cm B. 23 cm C. 33 cm D. 60 cm E. 66 cm Based on this diagram, calculate the total surface area of the cylinder. Answers and explanations C. The area is found by using the formula Substitute the values from the diagram into the formula: The area is 33 centimeters, Choice (C). A. Use the formula for surface area of a cylinder: The correct answer is Choice (A).

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Issue Essay on the GRE — Strategies and Practice Question

Article / Updated 03-26-2016

The GRE begins with two writing assignments, one of which is an Issue Analysis essay. This essay involves 30 minutes of intense writing, and requires you to choose one side of the stated issue and explain your reasoning. When working through the essay, be prepared to do the following: Declare your position and support it with sound reasoning and examples. Communicate clearly, so that your point can be understood by someone who doesn't know the topic. Critically think about how the topic fits in the big picture. Your challenge is to complete a quality essay within 30 minutes. Avoid these common pitfalls: Not clearly describing your point of view (as if assuming the essay grader can also read your mind) Taking too long to think about your topic, then rushing through the writing process and making all kinds of grammatical and spelling errors Getting stuck on the essay and panicking, thus using up all of the energy that you need for the rest of the GRE Essay question Write an essay in response to the following statement. Discuss the extent to which you agree or disagree with the statement. Explain your reasoning in a clear, well-organized essay that supports your position. Consider both sides of the issue when developing your response. It is more advantageous for a small community to allow development of their surrounding wilderness land for economic gain, rather than preserve it for recreational purposes. Answer and explanation The following essay is one possible response to the statement. Review it, and read the notes that follow. To determine which is better for a small community — growth in business and property development or protecting wilderness areas — one has to look at the benefits and losses each scenario brings to the equation. The desire to develop land points to a desire to increase the local economy by promoting business growth and collecting the ensuing additional property taxes. Thus, the issue comes down to which venture is more financially beneficial. If the local economy depends on the recreational tourism, it seems that taking away that attraction is counterproductive to improving revenue to support local citizens. This community may lack certain conveniences, such as large shopping complexes or variety in restaurants or entertainment options. There may also be a dearth of employment opportunities for the local community, leaving families struggling to make ends meet. The benefit of allowing the expansion of businesses and the introduction of mega-stores to solve these issues must be weighed against the losses incurred by the other sector of the economy, which may negate the benefits gained from these actions. This other sector — the wilderness and recreation sector — may lose business and revenue if it no longer has the facilities to attract tourists or conduct their businesses. If there are no tourists, there are no people to book guided tours, buy recreational equipment, and stay in area hotels. The tourists will not be spending money in the restaurants or grocery stores, spending fees to support wilderness and road maintenance, or buying souvenirs to remember their amazing trip. If these businesses are not able to bring in customers, they will be forced to close their doors, fire their employees, and cease their property tax payments. Such an event would have a profound impact on the local economy. If you look at the proposition in this way, the development of land for economic gain is counterproductive if no one will be around to spend money in those businesses. Either way, unemployment and inconvenience remain in the lives of community residents, but only one option provides the best hope. Protecting the core resource that creates the most financial support in the community is the smartest choice. For this town, that resource is the main attraction that keeps tourists coming back: the wilderness. There is guaranteed success of this venture, and this source of revenue should be protected for the betterment of the people. The author uses the technique of restating the issue in a different way before providing an opinion, which allows the reader to understand the writer's perspective. The pros and cons of this issue are thoughtfully presented, and the evidence to support both is clear and organized. The writer presents both points of view without losing the integrity of his opinion. Terms such as "negate" and "counterproductive" show a high level of understanding academic language. The writer's argument is well reasoned and, thus, accessible.

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Quantitative Comparison Problems on the GRE — Geometry

Article / Updated 03-26-2016

On the GRE Math test, Quantitative Comparison problems cover a wide range of subjects. For example, a geometry question might require you to work with circles, rectangles, triangles, cylinders, or cubes. In a Quantitative Comparison question, the problem lists Quantity A and Quantity B, which can be numbers, variables, equations, words, figures, and so on. Your job is to compare these two quantities and determine whether one is greater, they're equal, or the relationship can't be determined. The following practice questions ask you to compare angles in a triangle and a quadrilateral. Practice questions AC > CB > AB. Which quantity is greater? A: b B: a A. Quantity A is greater. B. Quantity B is greater. C. The quantities are equal. D. It cannot be determined from the information given. ABCD is a quadrilateral. Which quantity is greater? A: Angle D B: 55 degrees A. Quantity A is greater. B. Quantity B is greater. C. The quantities are equal. D. It cannot be determined from the information given. Answers and explanations A. Quantity A is greater. The longest side of a triangle is opposite the largest angle. Hence, b > a > c. Thus, Quantity A is greater, and Choice (A) is the correct answer. C. The quantities are equal. The interior angles of a quadrilateral add up to 360 degrees. We know three angles: Their sum is: Thus, the quantities are equal, Choice (C).

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Word Problems on the GRE — Strategies and Practice Questions

Article / Updated 03-26-2016

The word problems on the GRE Math test may include weighted averages, rate/time/distance, and permutations and combinations. If you're fresh out of math class, you'll probably be fine going through these quickly. If it's been a few years since you've tackled any word problems, you may want to work these questions carefully. Shortfalls in math are in three basic categories. See whether you're prone to one of these in particular: Mistakes in basic math, such as not placing the decimal point correctly Mistakes in working the problem, such as multiplying exponents when you should be adding them Not knowing how to work a certain math problem, such as setting up a probability The following practice questions will test your skills at calculating the weight of a cookie tin and the average donation needed based on existing donations. Practice questions The total weight of a tin and the cookies it contains is 2 pounds. After 3/4 of the cookies are eaten, the tin and the remaining cookies weigh 0.8 pounds. What is the weight of the empty tin in pounds? A. 0.2 B. 0.3 C. 0.4 D. 0.5 E. 0.6 A church was able to raise 75% of the total amount it needs for a new building by receiving an average donation of $600 from each parishioner. The people already solicited represent 60% of all parishioners. If the church is to raise exactly the amount it needs for the new building, what should be the average donation from the remaining people to be solicited? A. $150 B. $250 C. $300 D. $400 E. $500 Answers and explanations C. 0.4 Let the weight of the empty tin = w. The weight of the cookies = (2 – w). One quarter of the cookies weigh One quarter of the cookies + tin = 0.8. The weight of the empty tin is 0.4 pounds, Choice (C). C. $300 Let x be the total number of people the church will ask for donations. People already solicited = 0.6x First, calculate the amount of money already raised: (600)(0.6x) = 360x 360x constitutes 75% of the total amount needed, so 25% = 120x. Next, calculate the average donation needed from the remaining people: The average donation needed from the remaining parishioners is $300, Choice (C).

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