Office For Seniors For Dummies book cover

Office For Seniors For Dummies

Author:
Faithe Wempen
Published: January 12, 2022

Overview

Send emails, stay on top of your finances, and manage your everyday life with this no-experience-necessary Office 2021 handbook

Microsoft Office offers huge benefits to people of all ages. The popular software suite has always made creating to-do lists, sending emails, drafting documents, and processing spreadsheets a breeze, and the updates and upgrades found in Office 2021 make those tasks even easier.

Office For Seniors For Dummies offers step-by-step instructions to learn every part of Office 2021, including Word, Excel, and PowerPoint. This trusted guide starts at the very beginning, showing you how to start each application and understand the interface. It walks you through the most commonly used functions of each program and explains how to apply it in your everyday life. Written in large, crystal-clear type and full of helpful images and screenshots, the book also demonstrates how to:

  • Stay in touch with friends and family using Office 2021's built-in communications tools, including Outlook
  • Keep your finances up to date with functional spreadsheets in Excel
  • Take advantage of existing Office templates for things like budgets, letters, faxes, and more

You don't have to be a computer scientist to get the most out of Office 2021. Let this handy guide clarify and demystify some of the most practical and user-friendly applications available today.

Send emails, stay on top of your finances, and manage your everyday life with this no-experience-necessary Office 2021 handbook

Microsoft Office offers huge benefits to people of all ages. The popular software suite has always made creating to-do lists, sending emails, drafting documents, and processing spreadsheets a breeze, and the updates and upgrades found in Office 2021 make those tasks even easier.

Office For Seniors For Dummies offers step-by-step instructions to learn every part of Office 2021, including Word, Excel, and PowerPoint. This trusted guide starts at the very beginning, showing you how to start each application and understand the interface. It walks you through the most

commonly used functions of each program and explains how to apply it in your everyday life. Written in large, crystal-clear type and full of helpful images and screenshots, the book also demonstrates how to:
  • Stay in touch with friends and family using Office 2021's built-in communications tools, including Outlook
  • Keep your finances up to date with functional spreadsheets in Excel
  • Take advantage of existing Office templates for things like budgets, letters, faxes, and more

You don't have to be a computer scientist to get the most out of Office 2021. Let this handy guide clarify and demystify some of the most practical and user-friendly applications available today.

Office 2021 For Seniors For Dummies Cheat Sheet

After you discover keyboard shortcuts in Office, you’ll wonder how you ever functioned without them. Keyboard shortcuts make common tasks faster and easier. By pressing a key combination, you can duplicate many of the most commonly used commands and tasks. Some of the keyboard shortcuts are the same across multiple applications, whereas others are specific to a particular application.

Articles From The Book

21 results

General Microsoft Articles

How to Move and Copy Content in Office 2019

For large-scale editing (such as whole paragraphs and pages of text) of Office 2019 Files, you can easily move or copy text and graphics within the same application (even between different data files) or from one application to another. For example, suppose you want to create some slides for a presentation you’re giving at a club meeting. You could write the outline in Word, and then copy the text over to PowerPoint to dress up with graphics and animation. Here are two ways of moving and copying in Office 2019:

  • Drag and drop: Use the mouse to drag selected text or graphics from one location to another.

    To drag and drop between applications, both application windows must be visible onscreen at once. You may need to move and resize windows to make that happen. To move a window, drag its title bar. To resize a window, drag the bottom-right corner of the window. If it won’t resize, it’s probably maximized; click the Restore button to un-maximize it and make it resizable.

  • The Clipboard: Cut or copy the content to the Clipboard (a temporary holding area in Windows), and then paste it into a different location.
  • Dragging and dropping within a document: If you’re dragging and dropping content within a document but the source and the destination locations are too far apart to see at the same time, you might want to open another window that contains the same file, and then scroll them to two different spots. To do this in Word, Excel, or PowerPoint, choose View → Window →  New Window. Because you need to be able to see both the starting and ending points at the same time, you might have to arrange and resize some windows onscreen.

If you open a new window with View →  Window →  New Window, the second window will have the same name but will have a number appended to it, such as Budget.xlsx:2. The second window is an alternate view of the first; any changes made in one are reflected in the other.

  • Dragging and dropping between documents: Open both documents at the same time. You must be able to see both the starting and ending points at the same time, so you might have to arrange and resize some windows onscreen.

    You aren’t limited to copying content between documents in the same application. That is, you can copy from Word to Word, Word to PowerPoint, and so on. The image below shows an example of copying content from a Word document to an Excel spreadsheet.

To make a copy of the selected text or graphic using drag-and-drop, hold down Ctrl while you drag. You’ll notice as you drag that the mouse pointer shows a tiny plus sign, indicating that you’re making a copy.

If setting up the display so that both the source and the destination appear onscreen at once is awkward, you’re better off using the Clipboard method of moving content. This method places the source material in a hidden temporary storage area in Windows, and then pastes it from there into the destination location. Because the Clipboard is nearly universal, you can use it to move or copy data from (almost) any application to any other application, even non-Microsoft programs. For example, you could copy text from Word and paste it into a graphics program such as Photoshop, and it would appear there as a graphic. Or you could copy spreadsheet cells from Excel and paste them into a website–building application such as Dreamweaver, and the cells would appear there as a web table. The three Clipboard operations in Office 2019 are Cut, Copy, and Paste.
  • To move something: Use Cut and then Paste.
  • To copy something: Use Copy and then Paste.

Moving or copying via the Clipboard method is always a two-step process.

The table below summarizes the ways of issuing the Cut, Copy, and Paste commands. The Home tab’s Clipboard group on the Ribbon provides buttons for the commands, but you can also use keyboard or mouse methods if you find them easier.

If you use the Ribbon buttons frequently for Cut, Copy, and Paste, consider adding them to the Quick Access toolbar so you can get to them without having to switch to the Home tab.

General Microsoft Articles

How to Align and Indent Paragraphs in Word 2019

In Word 2019, you can format entire paragraphs to reduce the monotony of your formatting tasks. Paragraphs are the building blocks of Word documents. Every time you press Enter, you create a new paragraph in a Word document. You can see the paragraph markers (which don’t print) by clicking the Show/Hide button on the Word 2019 Home tab (in the Paragraph group). This button toggles on/off the display of hidden characters such as spaces, paragraph breaks, line breaks, and tabs. The image below shows a document with the display turned on.

Some folks find seeing these characters very distracting. However, showing them can be very helpful when you’re trying to make sure you have only one space between words, or when you accidentally press the Tab key and make text skip like this — and then fix it.

Each paragraph in Word has a horizontal alignment, which determines how each line aligns between the right and left margins. The default is left alignment, where each line begins at the left margin. Left alignment is appropriate for most situations; the text in most books is left-aligned. The alternatives are
  • Right alignment: Each line ends at the right margin. You might use this to right-align the date in some styles of business letters.
  • Center alignment: Each line is centered evenly between the margins. You might want to center your name and address on stationery you create.
  • Justified: Each line has additional space added to it as needed so that it begins at the left margin and ends at the right margin. With justified alignment, all lines of the paragraph except the last one are spaced that way; the final line of the paragraph is left-aligned. If the paragraph consists of only a single line, it is left-aligned. Newsletter text is often justified, making for a tidier-looking page.
The image below shows some examples of the four types of alignment for a Word document. To change one paragraph’s alignment, move the insertion point into it, or select any (or all) text within it. Then click the paragraph alignment button you want. To apply a different alignment to multiple paragraphs at once, select multiple paragraphs (or any part of them). Then click the paragraph alignment button you want. By default, each paragraph starts in relation to the right and left margins, depending on what alignment you choose for your Word documents. For example, a left-aligned paragraph starts at the same position as the left margin, like this text. Sometimes you might want to indent one or more paragraphs, though: that is, shift their position in relation to the left and/or right margins. For example, in some styles of correspondence, it’s customary to indent the first line of each paragraph by one-half inch (or five spaces). Or, when citing a quotation, it’s common to indent a paragraph by one-half inch at both the right and the left.

Indenting almost always involves shifting the edge of a paragraph inward toward the center of the page, but it is possible to have negative indents, by using negative numbers to specify the indentation amount. Some people call these “outdents,” but that’s just a made-up word.

Here are the possible types of indents in Word.
  • First-line indent: Only the first line of the paragraph is indented.
  • Hanging indent: Every line of the paragraph except the first one is indented.
  • Left indent: All lines of the paragraph are indented in relation to the left margin.
  • Right indent: All lines of the paragraph are indented in relation to the right margin.
For a simple left indent, use buttons on the Home tab (Paragraph group): Increase Indent and Decrease Indent. Each time you click one of those buttons, it changes the left indent for the selected paragraph(s) by 0.5.” If you want to specify the amount of indent or if you want to apply an indent to the right side, use the Indent controls on the Word 2019 Layout tab. (Check here to see more of the Word 2019 ribbon.) You can increment the amount of indent up or down in the Left and Right text boxes. If you want a special indent (hanging or first-line), use the Paragraph dialog box. To do so, follow these steps:
  1. Select the paragraph(s) to which the setting should apply.
  2. On the Home or the Layout tab, click the small icon in the bottom right of the Paragraph group.
  3. In the Paragraph dialog box that opens, enter values in the Left and/or Right text boxes as desired to create overall indents for the paragraph(s).
  4. (Optional) If you want a special type of indent (such as hanging, or first-line), open the Special drop-down list and make your selection. Then enter the amount of the special indent in the text box to the right. In the image above, for example, a hanging indent has been set of 0.9”. That means all lines except the first one will be left-indented by 0.9”.
  5. Click OK. The indent settings are applied.

General Microsoft Articles

How to Insert Cover Pages and Other Building Blocks in Word 2019

Word 2019 has all the tools you need to present a professional and modern document. Many different Word document types can benefit from a good-looking cover page: a committee report, a proposal for a home business, or a family album. Word offers a large gallery of sample cover pages that you can insert in your document and then customize.

Cover pages are automatically placed at the beginning of the Word document, before the current first page. You don’t have to position the insertion point at the beginning of the document before you insert them.

To insert a cover page, follow these steps:
  1. Choose Insert → Pages → Cover Page. A palette of cover page samples appears.
  2. Click the cover page you want to insert. It is placed at the beginning of the document.
  3. Fill in the placeholders on the cover page as desired.
To delete a cover page, choose Insert → Pages → Cover Page → Remove Current Cover Page. Cover pages are just one of several types of preformatted sample content that Word collectively calls building blocks. The page numbering samples are building blocks, as are preformatted headers and footers. To see all the building blocks that Word offers in one convenient place, choose Insert → Text → Explore Quick Parts → Building Blocks Organizer. This opens the Building Blocks Organizer dialog box. From here, you can browse the various types of content and insert anything you find that looks interesting. Some of the content types include equations, tables, text boxes, and watermarks.

Check out the rest of the Word 2019 ribbon.