Office For Seniors For Dummies book cover

Office For Seniors For Dummies

By: Faithe Wempen Published: 01-12-2022

Send emails, stay on top of your finances, and manage your everyday life with this no-experience-necessary Office 2021 handbook

Microsoft Office offers huge benefits to people of all ages. The popular software suite has always made creating to-do lists, sending emails, drafting documents, and processing spreadsheets a breeze, and the updates and upgrades found in Office 2021 make those tasks even easier.

Office For Seniors For Dummies offers step-by-step instructions to learn every part of Office 2021, including Word, Excel, and PowerPoint. This trusted guide starts at the very beginning, showing you how to start each application and understand the interface. It walks you through the most commonly used functions of each program and explains how to apply it in your everyday life. Written in large, crystal-clear type and full of helpful images and screenshots, the book also demonstrates how to:

  • Stay in touch with friends and family using Office 2021's built-in communications tools, including Outlook
  • Keep your finances up to date with functional spreadsheets in Excel
  • Take advantage of existing Office templates for things like budgets, letters, faxes, and more

You don't have to be a computer scientist to get the most out of Office 2021. Let this handy guide clarify and demystify some of the most practical and user-friendly applications available today.

Articles From Office For Seniors For Dummies

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23 results
Office 2021 For Seniors For Dummies Cheat Sheet

Cheat Sheet / Updated 12-07-2021

After you discover keyboard shortcuts in Office, you’ll wonder how you ever functioned without them. Keyboard shortcuts make common tasks faster and easier. By pressing a key combination, you can duplicate many of the most commonly used commands and tasks. Some of the keyboard shortcuts are the same across multiple applications, whereas others are specific to a particular application.

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How to Move and Copy Content in Office 2019

Article / Updated 03-04-2019

For large-scale editing (such as whole paragraphs and pages of text) of Office 2019 Files, you can easily move or copy text and graphics within the same application (even between different data files) or from one application to another. For example, suppose you want to create some slides for a presentation you’re giving at a club meeting. You could write the outline in Word, and then copy the text over to PowerPoint to dress up with graphics and animation. Here are two ways of moving and copying in Office 2019: Drag and drop: Use the mouse to drag selected text or graphics from one location to another. To drag and drop between applications, both application windows must be visible onscreen at once. You may need to move and resize windows to make that happen. To move a window, drag its title bar. To resize a window, drag the bottom-right corner of the window. If it won’t resize, it’s probably maximized; click the Restore button to un-maximize it and make it resizable. The Clipboard: Cut or copy the content to the Clipboard (a temporary holding area in Windows), and then paste it into a different location. Dragging and dropping within a document: If you’re dragging and dropping content within a document but the source and the destination locations are too far apart to see at the same time, you might want to open another window that contains the same file, and then scroll them to two different spots. To do this in Word, Excel, or PowerPoint, choose View → Window →  New Window. Because you need to be able to see both the starting and ending points at the same time, you might have to arrange and resize some windows onscreen. If you open a new window with View →  Window →  New Window, the second window will have the same name but will have a number appended to it, such as Budget.xlsx:2. The second window is an alternate view of the first; any changes made in one are reflected in the other. Dragging and dropping between documents: Open both documents at the same time. You must be able to see both the starting and ending points at the same time, so you might have to arrange and resize some windows onscreen. You aren’t limited to copying content between documents in the same application. That is, you can copy from Word to Word, Word to PowerPoint, and so on. The image below shows an example of copying content from a Word document to an Excel spreadsheet. To make a copy of the selected text or graphic using drag-and-drop, hold down Ctrl while you drag. You’ll notice as you drag that the mouse pointer shows a tiny plus sign, indicating that you’re making a copy. If setting up the display so that both the source and the destination appear onscreen at once is awkward, you’re better off using the Clipboard method of moving content. This method places the source material in a hidden temporary storage area in Windows, and then pastes it from there into the destination location. Because the Clipboard is nearly universal, you can use it to move or copy data from (almost) any application to any other application, even non-Microsoft programs. For example, you could copy text from Word and paste it into a graphics program such as Photoshop, and it would appear there as a graphic. Or you could copy spreadsheet cells from Excel and paste them into a website–building application such as Dreamweaver, and the cells would appear there as a web table. The three Clipboard operations in Office 2019 are Cut, Copy, and Paste. To move something: Use Cut and then Paste. To copy something: Use Copy and then Paste. Moving or copying via the Clipboard method is always a two-step process. The table below summarizes the ways of issuing the Cut, Copy, and Paste commands. The Home tab’s Clipboard group on the Ribbon provides buttons for the commands, but you can also use keyboard or mouse methods if you find them easier. Ways to Cut, Copy, and Paste in Office 2019 Command Keyboard Method Mouse Method Ribbon Method Cut Ctrl+X Right-click and choose Cut Home →  Clipboard →  Cut Copy Ctrl+C Right-click and choose Copy Home →  Clipboard →  Copy Paste Ctrl+V Right-click and choose Paste Home →  Clipboard →  Paste If you use the Ribbon buttons frequently for Cut, Copy, and Paste, consider adding them to the Quick Access toolbar so you can get to them without having to switch to the Home tab.

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How to Align and Indent Paragraphs in Word 2019

Article / Updated 03-01-2019

In Word 2019, you can format entire paragraphs to reduce the monotony of your formatting tasks. Paragraphs are the building blocks of Word documents. Every time you press Enter, you create a new paragraph in a Word document. You can see the paragraph markers (which don’t print) by clicking the Show/Hide button on the Word 2019 Home tab (in the Paragraph group). This button toggles on/off the display of hidden characters such as spaces, paragraph breaks, line breaks, and tabs. The image below shows a document with the display turned on. Some folks find seeing these characters very distracting. However, showing them can be very helpful when you’re trying to make sure you have only one space between words, or when you accidentally press the Tab key and make text skip like this — and then fix it. Each paragraph in Word has a horizontal alignment, which determines how each line aligns between the right and left margins. The default is left alignment, where each line begins at the left margin. Left alignment is appropriate for most situations; the text in most books is left-aligned. The alternatives are Right alignment: Each line ends at the right margin. You might use this to right-align the date in some styles of business letters. Center alignment: Each line is centered evenly between the margins. You might want to center your name and address on stationery you create. Justified: Each line has additional space added to it as needed so that it begins at the left margin and ends at the right margin. With justified alignment, all lines of the paragraph except the last one are spaced that way; the final line of the paragraph is left-aligned. If the paragraph consists of only a single line, it is left-aligned. Newsletter text is often justified, making for a tidier-looking page. The image below shows some examples of the four types of alignment for a Word document. To change one paragraph’s alignment, move the insertion point into it, or select any (or all) text within it. Then click the paragraph alignment button you want. To apply a different alignment to multiple paragraphs at once, select multiple paragraphs (or any part of them). Then click the paragraph alignment button you want. By default, each paragraph starts in relation to the right and left margins, depending on what alignment you choose for your Word documents. For example, a left-aligned paragraph starts at the same position as the left margin, like this text. Sometimes you might want to indent one or more paragraphs, though: that is, shift their position in relation to the left and/or right margins. For example, in some styles of correspondence, it’s customary to indent the first line of each paragraph by one-half inch (or five spaces). Or, when citing a quotation, it’s common to indent a paragraph by one-half inch at both the right and the left. Indenting almost always involves shifting the edge of a paragraph inward toward the center of the page, but it is possible to have negative indents, by using negative numbers to specify the indentation amount. Some people call these “outdents,” but that’s just a made-up word. Here are the possible types of indents in Word. First-line indent: Only the first line of the paragraph is indented. Hanging indent: Every line of the paragraph except the first one is indented. Left indent: All lines of the paragraph are indented in relation to the left margin. Right indent: All lines of the paragraph are indented in relation to the right margin. For a simple left indent, use buttons on the Home tab (Paragraph group): Increase Indent and Decrease Indent. Each time you click one of those buttons, it changes the left indent for the selected paragraph(s) by 0.5.” If you want to specify the amount of indent or if you want to apply an indent to the right side, use the Indent controls on the Word 2019 Layout tab. (Check here to see more of the Word 2019 ribbon.) You can increment the amount of indent up or down in the Left and Right text boxes. If you want a special indent (hanging or first-line), use the Paragraph dialog box. To do so, follow these steps: Select the paragraph(s) to which the setting should apply. On the Home or the Layout tab, click the small icon in the bottom right of the Paragraph group. In the Paragraph dialog box that opens, enter values in the Left and/or Right text boxes as desired to create overall indents for the paragraph(s). (Optional) If you want a special type of indent (such as hanging, or first-line), open the Special drop-down list and make your selection. Then enter the amount of the special indent in the text box to the right. In the image above, for example, a hanging indent has been set of 0.9”. That means all lines except the first one will be left-indented by 0.9”. Click OK. The indent settings are applied.

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How to Insert Cover Pages and Other Building Blocks in Word 2019

Article / Updated 03-01-2019

Word 2019 has all the tools you need to present a professional and modern document. Many different Word document types can benefit from a good-looking cover page: a committee report, a proposal for a home business, or a family album. Word offers a large gallery of sample cover pages that you can insert in your document and then customize. Cover pages are automatically placed at the beginning of the Word document, before the current first page. You don’t have to position the insertion point at the beginning of the document before you insert them. To insert a cover page, follow these steps: Choose Insert → Pages → Cover Page. A palette of cover page samples appears. Click the cover page you want to insert. It is placed at the beginning of the document. Fill in the placeholders on the cover page as desired. To delete a cover page, choose Insert → Pages → Cover Page → Remove Current Cover Page. Cover pages are just one of several types of preformatted sample content that Word collectively calls building blocks. The page numbering samples are building blocks, as are preformatted headers and footers. To see all the building blocks that Word offers in one convenient place, choose Insert → Text → Explore Quick Parts → Building Blocks Organizer. This opens the Building Blocks Organizer dialog box. From here, you can browse the various types of content and insert anything you find that looks interesting. Some of the content types include equations, tables, text boxes, and watermarks. Check out the rest of the Word 2019 ribbon.

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A Quick Tour of Outlook 2019 Mail

Article / Updated 03-01-2019

Many people use Outlook 2019 for the mail feature. After you configure Outlook for email, take a quick look around the Outlook interface as it pertains to email. Check out the following features: Navigation pane: This pane shows different things, depending on the part of Outlook you’re working with. When working with mail, it shows the Mail Folders list. You can move to a different folder by clicking its name here. Inbox: Whatever folder is selected on the Mail Folders list appears here. In the image above, that’s the Inbox. New mail arrives in the Inbox, so it’s the folder you work with most of the time. Reading pane: Whatever email message is selected in the Inbox appears here in preview. That way, you don’t have to open each message (by double-clicking it) to see what it contains. By default, the Reading pane appears to the right of the Inbox. You can have it appear below the Inbox window, though; choose View → Reading Pane → Bottom. The Navigation pane and Reading pane can be turned on or off from the View tab. Also on the View tab you can turn the To-Do bar or the People pane on and off. (Neither of these are on by default.) Navigation buttons: At the bottom of the Navigation pane are a series of buttons for moving to different parts of the Outlook program. The leftmost one (the envelope) represents Mail, in which you are now working. The others shown above, from left to right, are Calendar, People, and To-Do List. To access additional icons, click the ellipsis (…) for a pop-up menu of the other areas: Notes, Folders, and Shortcuts. Check out these Outlook 2019 keyboard shortcuts to speed things up.

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How to Create and Categorize Notes in Outlook 2019

Article / Updated 03-01-2019

Lots of people use sticky notes to create reminders for themselves of bits of information: everything from website passwords to memorable quotations. Outlook 2019 includes Notes, which are the electronic equivalent of these sticky notes. You can store anything you want on a note, but they are best used for small bits of data, like reservation confirmation codes or membership ID numbers. You can leave a note open (as long as Outlook is open) so that you will be reminded every time you see it, or you can close the note so that it isn’t in your way. To create a note, follow these steps: Display the Notes section of Outlook. To do so, click the More icon (…) in the lower-left corner of the window, and on the menu that appears, click Notes. Choose Home → New Note or press Ctrl+N. A new blank note appears. Check out these other Outlook 2019 keyboard shortcuts. In the new blank note that appears, type whatever you want. The first few words of the first line will appear as an icon title, so try to be descriptive there. Unless, of course, you’re trying to camouflage information, like a password; then you might want some misleading text as the first line. One clever user keeps her passwords in a note that is titled Family Birthdays, thinking that someone snooping to steal her passwords would not care about family birthdays and would pass that by. Close the note by clicking the X button in its upper-right corner. It’s saved automatically. Here are some handy Outlook note tips: To reopen a note: Double-click it. It remains open until you close it, or until you exit Outlook. To move a note: Drag it around by its title bar (the colored bar at the top of it), placing it anywhere onscreen, even outside boundaries of the Outlook window. It stays there until you close Outlook. To edit a note: Open it and edit away. To change the size of the note: Click on and drag its lower-right corner. To delete a note: Select it and do one of the following: Choose Home → Delete, press the Delete key on the keyboard, or right-click the note and choose Delete from the menu that opens. Just like with a deleted contact, a deleted note is moved to the Deleted Items folder. To retrieve a deleted note, open the Mail section of Outlook, display the contents of the Deleted Items folder, find the note, and drag it onto to the Notes icon in the lower-left corner of the window. You can also right-click it, choose Move to Folder, and then specify where you want to move it. How to categorize your Outlook notes Because a note is such a multipurpose item, you might find it useful to create categories to differentiate one type of note from another. By assigning a color to a note, you can indicate what type of information it contains. For example, you might choose to make financial notes green and make family notes blue. To assign a color category to a note Right-click the note and choose Categorize. A menu of color choices appears. Click the desired color. If your primary/default email account is of the IMAP type, you won’t be able to use categories. If you don’t see Categorize on the right-click menu, that’s why. If you have used this category before, you are done at this point. The note’s icon and background turn that color. However, the first time you use a certain color, the Rename Category dialog box opens, so you can assign a name. Outlook doesn’t affix any special meaning to a color; you do that on your own. If prompted, change the name in the Name box. Then click OK. If you want to rename a category, you can do so by following these steps: Choose Home → Categories → All Categories. The Color Categories dialog box opens. Click the desired category and click Rename. The name becomes editable. Type the new name and press Enter. Notice in the image above that you can also create and delete categories and change the color assigned to a category. (This might be useful, for example, if you wanted to change the color used to represent a certain category but you didn’t want to lose the category information already assigned to existing notes.) You can have up to 25 categories. A note can have multiple categories assigned to it. Each category is an on/off toggle for each note. A note’s icon shows only the color for the category last assigned to it, but it still retains its other categorization too. To remove a category from a note, select the note, click Home → Categorize, and click the category to toggle off for that note. The categories are also shared by the Calendar and Tasks features in Outlook. As you are creating categories, think about how you might like to categorize appointments and events too.

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How to Print Your Outlook Calendar

Article / Updated 02-28-2019

With an Outlook calendar, you can have your cake and eat it, too. You can not only have an electronic calendar, but also a paper one. Just print your Outlook calendar! You can print your Outlook calendar in Day, Week, Work Week, or Month view, for whatever date ranges you like. To print your Outlook 2019 calendar, follow these steps: Display the calendar. Choose File → Print or press Ctrl+P. Check out these other Outlook 2019 keyboard shortcuts. The Print options appear. Check the printer name under the Printer heading. If it’s not correct, click the current printer name to open a list of available printers and choose a different printer. In the Print What area, click the style you want. Not only can you choose from a variety of daily, weekly, and monthly calendars, but you can choose from a couple of other views that are for printing only: Tri-fold Style: Creates a compact calendar that shows your daily calendar, your Tasks list, and your weekly calendar, all in a format that you can easily fold for carrying in a pocket or envelope. Calendar Details Style: Creates a listing of all the events on your calendar for the day, including all details stored about each one. Click Print Options. The Print Options dialog box opens. In the Number of Copies field, enter the number of copies you want. (1 is the default.) In the Print Range area, enter the starting and ending dates for the printout. If you specify that you want to print only a few days, but you choose Month view to print, Outlook prints the entire month (or months, if the chosen dates span two months). The same goes for weeks. If you specify only one day to print but print Week view, Outlook prints the entire week. Click Print. The calendar prints.

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How to Add Contacts in Outlook 2019

Article / Updated 02-28-2019

Outlook refers to the information you store about people and organizations as contact information, and stores it in a folder called Contacts. To access the Contacts folder, click the Contacts icon (which looks like two people) in the bottom-left corner of the Outlook window. The Contacts folder shows each contact that you’ve entered into Outlook 2019. Although the image above shows several contacts, you don’t have any when you start out. You must enter each one individually. To store someone’s contact information, follow these steps: From the Contacts window, click the New Contact button in the upper-left corner. A new Untitled – Contact window appears. In step 1, you can also choose Home → New Contact or press Ctrl+N to start a new contact. Check out these other Outlook 2019 keyboard shortcuts. Fill in the information you want to store for the person or organization. You can fill in as much or as little as you like. The more complete you make an entry for a person, the more helpful Outlook can be. However, it takes more time to enter all the details required for a complete record than to just enter a name and email address. None of the fields are mandatory. Click the Save & Close button on the Ribbon. The contact is added to your Contacts list. Here are some tips to consider when you’re entering contact information in Outlook 2019: Whatever you type in the Full Name field replaces Untitled in the dialog box’s title bar immediately. In the File As field, specify how this entry is alphabetized. The default is by last name, so it reverses whatever you put in the Full Name field. For example, if you enter John Doe in the Full Name field, the File As appears as Doe, John. For people’s names, this is usually the best way to go. For a company name (such as ACME Corporation), though, you probably don’t want it alphabetized as Corporation, ACME. To fix that, open the File As drop-down list and choose ACME Corporation. If you enter a company name (in the Company field), even more choices are available from the File As list. For example, you can choose to alphabetize by the company name rather than the individual, and to put the individual or company name in parentheses, like these: ACME Corporation (Doe, John) Doe, John (ACME Corporation) You can store multiple email addresses for the same person. Notice that Email isn’t just a field label, but also a drop-down list. Open the list and choose Email 2, Email 3, and so on for additional addresses. All Phone Numbers fields also have drop-down lists associated with their labels. You can store four phone numbers for a person, and you can choose which labels each of those will carry. For example, you could assign the label Mobile to one of the phone numbers. You can have three addresses for a person: Business, Home, and Other. Switch between them with the drop-down list in the Addresses section. When you enter an address but don’t enter it in proper mailing format (address, city, state, and zip code), a dialog box will prompt you to fill those in. This is for your own protection: to make sure every address you enter is usable. Use the Notes pane to store any additional information about the person that doesn’t match up with any of the fields. The default fields that appear are called the General fields. There are more fields available. On the Contact tab, in the Show group, click Details to see others. To customize how your Contacts appear, choose from sets of fields other than the defaults.

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How to Avoid Frauds, Scams, and Viruses in Outlook 2019

Article / Updated 02-28-2019

For many, Outlook is their primary email application. As such, it presents a high threat for frauds, scams and viruses. You might have heard horror stories about people whose computers became infected with viruses, worms, and all sorts of other nasty things, and who had to pay a lot of money to get it cleaned up — if they could. These stories are real, and so is the threat. However, you can do some very basic things to minimize your exposure to such risks. First, these are the threats to Outlook 2019: Spoofing/phishing: These legitimate-looking email messages contain bogus links to websites that can trick you into providing confidential information, such as passwords and bank account data. Thieves then use this information to steal your identity and empty your bank accounts. Viruses: These executable files (that is, program files) do destructive things to your computer, such as delete files or corrupt a disk. Watch out for files with an .exe Worms: These program files or scripts use your computer to send out mass-mailings of spam without your knowledge or consent. Exploits: These program files or scripts target weaknesses in your computer’s security to use it to send out spam or do other harmful things. These usually come from hidden utilities built into some websites. Spyware: These hidden programs spy on your usage habits (including passwords you type, in some cases) and report them back to their owner via the Internet. Adware: These hidden programs pop up ads on your screen, or change the behavior of your web browser to display its own ads. Unwanted search toolbars: These add-on toolbars replace your default search tools with the search database sponsored by a certain company, so that the results of your searches bring up their sponsored sites. Those are the threats you face. Now, look at how to face them down. Here are the top ten tips: Windows comes with a basic antivirus program (Windows Defender), but you might want to get a more full-featured one that includes email scanning. Two of the most popular are Symantec (Norton) Antivirus and McAfee VirusScan. Most full-featured antivirus programs include incoming and outgoing email scanning. Keep that feature turned on. It will protect you from most viruses and worms attached to emails. If you get an email with an attachment, be suspicious of it. Do not open the attachment until you verify the following: Is the attachment from someone you know? Were you expecting a file from that person? If the answer to either question is No, contact the person who sent it to you and find out what it is before you open it. Never open any attachments that have any of these extensions (file types): EXE, COM, BAT, VBS. If you get an email with an attachment with a ZIP extension, be extra suspicious. (A ZIP file contains other files.) One common worm infection distributes itself in a ZIP file that’s marked as an online greeting card, for example. If you get an email message that appears to be from your bank or a government office, be very suspicious. Most banks and government offices don’t do important business via email. Instead, go directly to the organization’s website by typing its address into your web browser. Whatever you do, do not click the link in the message. If you get an email message that appears to be from PayPal or eBay, be suspicious. These companies do sometimes send out legitimate emails, but phishing sites often impersonate those sites. Go directly to PayPal or eBay via your web browser; do not click the links in the emails. If a message from PayPal or eBay doesn’t address you by name, it’s more likely to be a fake. However, this isn’t a reliable way to tell. If you’re not sure about a link in an email, point the mouse pointer to the link. A ScreenTip appears showing the actual address that the link is pointing to. If it doesn’t match the text on the link, it’s probably a fake. Some unwanted search toolbars trick you into installing them as you install other software. You can usually get rid of them via Control Panel in Windows. (Right-click Start and click Control Panel and then under the Programs heading, click Uninstall a program. Scroll through the list of installed programs there and look for anything with toolbar in the name — and remove it. The Yahoo! and Google toolbars are okay to keep; these are legitimate. They’re optional, however, and a lot of people find that proprietary toolbars of any kind just gunk up their browser interface.

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Troubleshooting Mail Setup Problems in Outlook 2019

Article / Updated 02-28-2019

Each email service has its own quirks in how the account has to be set up in Outlook 2019 (or any mail program) to properly send and receive. Outlook 2019 can automatically detect the settings in many cases, but it can’t always detect every service correctly. If Outlook 2019 wasn’t able to successfully send a test message, you need to do some troubleshooting. Don’t panic, though. It’s not that difficult. If you get stuck, you can always call your ISP’s tech support line and get help. If you’re using a web-based email provider, it might not work with Outlook. Some services have workarounds that you can follow to make them work in Outlook; check the tech support section at the website where you get your web-based mail to see whether there is anything you can do. To troubleshoot mail problems, make sure you have the following information handy. If you don’t have it, contact your ISP. It might also be available on the ISP’s website. Your email address and password: You probably have this already from your earlier attempt. The incoming and outgoing mail server addresses: They both might be the same. If you’re using a web-based email provider, it might not work with Outlook. Some services have workarounds that you can follow to make them work in Outlook; check the tech support section at the website where you get your web-based mail to see whether there is anything you can do. The incoming and outgoing mail server port numbers. (Don't worry about what a port is. It’s not important for end-users to understand ports. Just get the numbers.) Information about what encryption method should be used, if any. Information about whether your incoming mail server requires logon using Secure Password Authentication (SPA) or not. (Again, don’t worry about what this is; just get a yes or no answer on it.) Information about whether your outgoing mail server requires authentication: And if so, whether the outgoing server requires a different username and password than your regular one. Armed with all that information, do the following to troubleshoot mail setup in Outlook 2019: Choose File →  Account Settings → Account Settings. The Account Options dialog box opens. Click the email account you want to troubleshoot and then click Repair. The same Outlook dialog box appears. Click Advanced Options. Doing so causes a check box to appear. Click to mark the Let Me Repair My Account Manually check box. Click Repair. An Account Settings dialog box opens. Check all the information in the dialog box to make sure that it matches the information you have about your mail account. Account type: Outlook chose this automatically for you when you set up the account initially. It appears in the heading at the top of the dialog box; here it’s IMAP, for example. User name: Your email address. Password: Your account password. Server: This is that mail server address mentioned earlier. You get this from your Internet service provider (ISP). There may be separate mail server addresses for incoming and outgoing email. Port: This number also comes from your ISP. Encryption method: This information also comes from your ISP. Require logon using Secure Password Authentication (SPA): Your ISP will tell you whether you need to mark this check box. You can’t change the account type. If it’s wrong, you will need to delete that account from Outlook and set it up again, as if it were a new account. Then when setting it up anew, click Advanced Options and then mark the Let Me Set Up My Account Manually check box. Doing so opens an extra setup screen on which you can change the account type. Click Outgoing Mail. The incoming mail settings are hidden, and the outgoing ones appear. Check all the information in the dialog box to make sure that it matches the information you have about your mail account. Server: This is the outgoing mail server address. You get this from your Internet service provider (ISP). Port: This number comes from your ISP. Encryption method: This information also comes from your ISP. Server timeouts: The default is 1 minute. If you get server timeout messages when you try to check your email in Outlook because your mail server is really slow to respond, you can increase this value. Require logon using Secure Password Authentication (SPA): Your ISP will tell you whether or not you need to mark this check box. My Outgoing (SMTP) Server Requires Authentication: Your ISP will tell you what setting to use. Click Repair. Outlook tests the new settings and tries to send a test email message. If you see the message Account Successfully Repaired, you’re good to go. If not, contact your email service provider’s tech support and find out what setting you need to change to make it work.

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