Windows 10 All-in-One For Dummies book cover

Windows 10 All-in-One For Dummies

Published: January 27, 2021

Overview

Dig into the ins and outs of Windows 10  

Computer users have been “doing Windows” since the 1980s. That long run doesn’t mean everyone knows the best-kept secrets of the globally ubiquitous operating system. Windows 10 All-in-One For Dummies, 4th Edition offers a deep guide for navigating the basics of Windows 10 and diving into more advanced features.  

Authors and recognized Windows experts Ciprian Rusen and Woody Leonhard deliver a comprehensive and practical resource that provides the knowledge you need to operate Windows 10, along with a few shortcuts to make using a computer feel less like work. 

This book teaches you all about the most important parts of Windows 10, including: 

  • Installing and starting a fresh Windows 10 installation 
  • Personalizing Windows 10 
  • Using Universal Apps in Windows 10 
  • How to control your system through the Control Panel in Windows 10 
  • Securing Windows 10 against a universe of threats 

Windows 10 All-in-One For Dummies, 4th Edition is perfect for business users of Windows 10 who need to maximize their productivity and efficiency with the operating system. It also belongs on the bookshelf of anyone who hopes to improve their general Windows 10 literacy, from the complete novice to the power-user. 

Dig into the ins and outs of Windows 10  

Computer users have been “doing Windows” since the 1980s. That long run doesn’t mean everyone knows the best-kept secrets of the globally ubiquitous operating system. Windows 10 All-in-One For Dummies, 4th Edition offers a deep guide for navigating the basics of Windows 10 and diving into more advanced features.  

Authors and recognized Windows experts Ciprian Rusen and Woody Leonhard deliver a comprehensive and practical resource that provides the knowledge you need to operate Windows 10, along with a few shortcuts to make using a computer feel less like work. 

This book teaches you all about the most important parts of Windows 10, including: 

  • Installing and starting a fresh Windows 10 installation 
baseline; user-select: text; -webkit-user-drag: none; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: transparent; cursor: text; overflow: visible;">Personalizing Windows 10 
  • Using Universal Apps in Windows 10 
  • How to control your system through the Control Panel in Windows 10 
  • Securing Windows 10 against a universe of threats 
  • Windows 10 All-in-One For Dummies, 4th Edition is perfect for business users of Windows 10 who need to maximize their productivity and efficiency with the operating system. It also belongs on the bookshelf of anyone who hopes to improve their general Windows 10 literacy, from the complete novice to the power-user. 

    Windows 10 All-In-One For Dummies Cheat Sheet

    Adjusting to a new operating system, whether you're upgrading from an old version of Windows to Windows 10 or you've purchased a new machine running Windows 10, isn't an easy thing to do. In this cheat sheet, you'll find out what you should do right away, what you shouldn't do, and how to find the features you're used to. You also will find some tips for keeping your sanity while adjusting to your new operating system.

    Articles From The Book

    5 results

    Windows 10 Articles

    How to Use Event Viewer in Windows 10

    Every Windows 10 user needs to know about Event Viewer. Windows has had an Event Viewer for almost a decade. Few people know about it. At its heart, the Event Viewer looks at a small handful of logs that Windows maintains on your PC. The logs are simple text files, written in XML format. Although you may think of Windows as having one Event Log file, in fact, there are many — Administrative, Operational, Analytic, and Debug, plus application log files.

    The Event Viewer logs

    Every program that starts on your PC posts a notification in an Event Log, and every well-behaved program posts a notification before it stops. Every system access, security change, operating system twitch, hardware failure, and driver hiccup all end up in one or another Event Log. The Event Viewer scans those text log files, aggregates them, and puts a pretty interface on a deathly dull, voluminous set of machine-generated data. Think of Event Viewer as a database reporting program, where the underlying database is just a handful of simple flat text files.

    In theory, the Event Logs track "significant events" on your PC. In practice, the term "significant" is in the eyes of the beholder. Or programmer. In the normal course of, uh, events, few people ever need to look at any of the Event Logs. But if your PC starts to turn sour, the Event Viewer may give you important insight to the source of the problem.

    How to find the Event Viewer

    Follow these steps:
    1. Click in the Search field in the bottom left corner of your screen. Search for Event Viewer. Click on Event Viewer in the search results.

      The Event Viewer appears.

    2. On the left, choose Custom Views and, underneath that, Administrative Events.

      It may take a while, but eventually you see a list of notable events like the one shown.

    3. Don't freak out.

      Even the best-kept system boasts reams of scary-looking error messages — hundreds, if not thousands of them. That's normal. See the table for a breakdown.

      Events are logged by various parts of Windows.

    Other logs to check out

    The Administrative Events log isn't the only one you can see; it's a distillation of the other event logs, with an emphasis on the kinds of things a mere human might want to see.

    Other logs include the following:

    • Application events: Programs report on their problems.

    • Security events: They're called "audits" and show the results of a security action. Results can be either successful or failed depending on the event, such as when a user tries to log on.

    • Setup events: This primarily refers to domain controllers, which is something you don't need to worry about.

    • System events: Most of the errors and warnings you see in the Administrative Events log come from system events. They're reports from Windows system files about problems they've encountered. Almost all of them are self-healing.

    • Forwarded events: These are sent to this computer from other computers.

    Windows 10 Articles

    How to Install a Second Internal Hard Drive on Your Windows 10 Device

    You probably know how easy it is to install an external hard drive on a Windows 10 PC. Basically, you turn off the Windows 10 computer, plug the USB or eSATA cable into your computer, turn it on … and you’re finished. But, what if you need to install a second internal hard drive on your Windows 10 device? Installing a second internal hard drive into a Windows 10 PC that’s made to take two or more hard drives is only a little bit more complex than plugging an external drive into your USB port. Almost all desktop PCs can handle more than one internal hard drive. Some Windows 10 laptops can, too.

    Yes, external hard drive manufacturers have fancy software. No, you don’t want it. Windows already knows all the tricks. If you install one additional hard drive, internal or external, you can set up File History. Install two additional drives, internal or external, and you can turn on Storage Spaces. None of the Windows 10 programs need or want whatever programs the hard drive manufacturer offers.

    If you need help, the manufacturer’s website has instructions. Adding the physical drive inside the computer case is really very simple — even if you’ve never seen the inside of your computer — as long as you’re careful to get a drive that will hook up with the connectors inside your machine. For example, you can attach an IDE drive to only an IDE connector; ditto for SATA.

    Here’s how to install a second internal hard drive on a Windows 10 computer:
    1. Turn off your PC. Crack open the case, put in the new hard drive, attach the cables, and secure the drive, probably with screws. Close the case. Turn on the power, and log in to Windows.
    2. Right-click in the lower-left corner of the screen, and choose Disk Management. The Disk Management dialog box appears.
    3. Scroll down the list, and find your new drive, probably marked Unallocated. The new drive is identified as Disk 0.
    4. On the right, in the Unallocated area, tap and hold down or right-click, and choose New Simple Volume. The New Simple Volume Wizard appears.
    5. Tap or click Next. You’re asked to specify a volume size.
    6. Leave the numbers just as they are — you want to use the whole drive — and tap or click Next. The wizard asks you to specify a drive letter. D: is most common, unless you already have a D: drive.
    7. If you really, really want to give the drive a different letter, go ahead and do so (most people should leave it at D:). Tap or click Next. The wizard wants to know whether you want to use something other than the NTFS file system or to set a different allocation unit. You don't.
    8. Tap or click Next; then tap or click Finish. Windows whirs and clunks, and when it’s finished, you have a spanking new drive, ready to be used.

    If you have three or more drives in or attached to your PC, consider setting up Storage Spaces. It’s a remarkable piece of technology that’ll keep redundant copies of all your data and protect you from catastrophic failure of any of your data drives.

    Changing Your Windows 10 C: DRIVE

    Whoa, nelly! If you’ve never seen a Windows 10 PC running an SSD (solid-state drive) as the system drive, you better nail down the door and shore up the, uh, windows. Changing your C: drive from a run-of-the-mill rotating platter to a fast, shiny new solid-state drive can make everything work so much faster. Really. Unfortunately, getting from an HDD (hard disk drive) C: to an SSD C: ain’t exactly 1-2-3. Part of the problem is the mechanics of transferring your Windows 10 system from an HDD to an SSD: You need to create a copy (not exactly a clone) that’ll boot Windows. Part of the problem is moving all the extra junk off the C: drive, so the SSD isn’t swamped with all the flotsam and jetsam you’ve come to know and love in Windows. Most of the drive cloning/backup/restore techniques developed over the past decade work when you want to move from a smaller drive to a bigger one. However, replacing your HDD C: drive with an SSD C: drive almost always involves going from a larger drive to a smaller one. LifeHacker has an excellent rundown of the steps you need to take to get your old hard drive removed and have everything copied over to your new SSD, using a backup program called EaseUS Todo Backup Free. A friendly warning, it’s not a simple process.

    OneDrive Articles

    What Is OneDrive?

    OneDrive is an internet-based storage platform with a significant chunk of space offered for free by Microsoft to anyone with a Microsoft account. Think of it as a hard drive in the cloud, which you can share, with a few extra benefits thrown in. One of the primary benefits: OneDrive hooks into Windows 10, at least in fits and starts. Microsoft, of course, wants you to buy more storage, but you're under no obligation to do so.

    How much storage can you get?

    As of this writing, OneDrive gives everyone with a Microsoft account 5GB of free storage, with 50GB for $2/month. Many Office 365 subscription levels provide 1TB (1,024GB) of OneDrive storage, free, for as long as you're an Office 365 subscriber. Microsoft's offers change from time to time, but the general trend is down — prices are going down, fast, and it won't be too long before most online storage approaches free. The free storage is there, regardless of whether you use your Microsoft account to log in to Windows, and even if you never use OneDrive. In fact, if you have a Microsoft account, you're all signed up for OneDrive.

    OneDrive can be confusing

    Many people find OneDrive — at least the Windows 7, 8, and 10 versions of OneDrive — very confusing because, in essence, OneDrive keeps two sets of books. (Windows 8.1 OneDrive, by contrast is quite upfront about the whole process.) In Windows 10's OneDrive, there's the whole OneDrive enchilada stored on the web. But there's a second, shadow, subset of OneDrive folders that are stored on your computer. Some OneDrive users have all their web-based files and folders stored on their computers, and OneDrive syncs the folders quite quickly — what you see in File Explorer is what's stored in the cloud, and vice versa. But other OneDrive users have only some of their OneDrive folders on their computers. File Explorer shows them only this subset of folders and hides all the others that are sitting in the cloud. If you aren't confused, you obviously don't understand.

    What OneDrive does for you

    OneDrive does what all the other cloud storage services do — it gives you a place to put your files on the internet. You need to log in to OneDrive with your Microsoft account (or, equivalently, log in to Windows with your Microsoft account) to access your data. If you log in to a different Windows 10 computer using the same Microsoft account, you have access to all your OneDrive data through the web but, surprisingly, not necessarily through File Explorer. In fact, if you look only at Windows File Explorer, you might not even know what data is sitting in your OneDrive storage. This is one of the most confusing and dangerous parts of Windows 10. Realize that Windows File Explorer, when looking at OneDrive, is lying to you. File Explorer offers a very simple process for copying files from your computer into OneDrive, as long as you want to put the file in a folder that's visible to File Explorer. File Explorer lets you move files in the other direction, from OneDrive storage on to your local hard drive, but again you must be able to see the file or folder in File Explorer before you can move it. You can share files or folders that are stored in OneDrive by sending or posting a link to the file or folder to whomever you want. So, for example, if you want Aunt Martha to be able to see the folder full of pictures of Little Billy, OneDrive creates a link for you that you can email to Aunt Martha. You can also specify that a file or folder is Public, so anyone can see it. To work with the OneDrive platform on a mobile device, you can download and install one of the OneDrive programs — OneDrive for Mac, OneDrive for iPhone, iPad, or Android. The mobile apps have many of the same problems that you find in File Explorer in Windows 10. In Windows 10, you don't need to download or install a special program for OneDrive — it's already baked into Windows. If you have the program installed, OneDrive syncs data among computers, phones, and/or tablets that are set up using the same Microsoft account, as soon as you connect to a network. If you change a OneDrive file on your iPad, for example, when you save it, the modified file is put in your OneDrive storage area on the Internet. From there, the new version of the file is available to all other computers with access to the file. Ditto for Android devices.