Weight Loss Surgery Cookbook For Dummies book cover

Weight Loss Surgery Cookbook For Dummies

By: Brian K. Davidson and Sarah Krieger Published: 11-30-2016

Get empowered to safely keep the weight off after surgery

If you're reading this, odds are you have made the very important decision to improve your health by undergoing weight loss surgery. Hats off to you—it's no small feat and could very well have saved your life! While your surgeon provided you with the tool to assist you in losing weight, making that tool work is up to you—and that's where this sensitive and authoritative guide comes in.

In Weight Loss Surgery Cookbook For Dummies, 2nd Edition you'll find the fail-safe, easy-to-follow guidance you need to make smart, informed choices as you adopt a healthy eating regimen to your lifestyle. Packed with 100 plus delicious recipes, healthy recommendations, the latest information on grasping the ingredients in your food, expert tips on meal planning and shopping, and so much more, you'll find everything you need to safely keep those pounds coming off post-surgery.

  • Successfully navigate a post-surgery lifestyle
  • Get the lowdown on the latest dietary guidelines
  • Know which foods to buy and how to prepare them
  • Stay on track with meal planning, setting up your kitchen, and more

Losing those initial pounds through surgery is just the first step—and this book helps you make the lifelong lifestyle changes needed to maintain your weight without sacrificing the pleasure of eating delicious food.

Articles From Weight Loss Surgery Cookbook For Dummies

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29 results
Egg Dishes for Your Post Weight Loss Surgery Diet

Article / Updated 02-14-2017

Because eggs are high in protein and can be kept soft, they are an ideal food for someone who's undergone weight loss surgery. Eggs have many different applications, from scrambled eggs to light and airy soufflés. No other food is as versatile or can be so diverse in so many recipes. Egg substitutes are often used to help lower the fat and cholesterol contents of a dish. These products are made mostly of egg whites, which contain a good amount of protein. They're excellent to use in dishes that contain high-fat ingredients, like cheese, to help keep the calories and fat content lower. If you're making scrambled eggs, you can substitute the whites of two eggs for each whole egg. So if you're scrambling four eggs for breakfast, make it healthier by using two whole eggs and four more egg whites. If you want to reduce the cholesterol even more, use one whole egg and six egg whites. After surgery some people have difficulty tolerating eggs. This has a lot to do with the texture: If a cooked egg is too rubbery, like a hardboiled egg, you may have trouble getting it down and keeping it down. Try a fluffy scrambled egg instead. Berry Delicious Egg Custard Stage: Soft Foods Preparation time: 5 minutes Cook time: 35 minutes Yield: 4 servings 1 cup water 2 large eggs 4 teaspoons sugar substitute 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1/4 teaspoon salt 2 cups nonfat evaporated milk 1 cup raspberries 1 cup blueberries 1/4 teaspoon nutmeg Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Pour 1 cup of water into a 9-x-13-inch baking pan and place it to the side. Using nonstick cooking spray, grease an 8-x-8 baking dish. In a small bowl, beat together the eggs, sugar substitute, vanilla, and salt until well blended. Then pour the nonfat evaporated milk into the egg mixture and stir until blended. Mix together the raspberries and blueberries and spread on the bottom of the 8-x-8 pan. Pour the egg custard mixture over the top. Place the 8-x-8 dish into the 9-x-13 pan that's filled with water. (This creates a double boiler and prevents the custard from curdling.) Bake for 35 minutes, or until a knife inserted in the center of the custard comes out clean. After removing the finished custard from the oven, sprinkle the nutmeg on top. Per Serving: Calories 178 (From Fat 28); Fat 3g (Saturated 1g); Cholesterol 111mg; Sodium 326mg; Carbohydrate 24g (Dietary Fiber 3g); Protein 13g; Sugar 21g. Be sure not to use sweetened condensed milk, made by adding a whole bunch of sugar to whole milk and then removing 50 percent of the water. The high added-sugar content can cause dumping syndrome if you have had GBP. Canadian Bacon and Spinach Frittata Stage: Regular Foods Preparation time: 6 minutes Cook time: 25 minutes Yield: 8 servings 12 large eggs 8 ounces Canadian bacon, cut into 1/4-inch cubes and cooked 1/2 cup chopped green onions 1/2 teaspoon paprika 1/4 teaspoon garlic powder 1/4 teaspoon dried mustard 1/4 teaspoon salt 1/4 teaspoon black pepper 2 cups fresh baby spinach 1 cup shredded lowfat sharp cheddar cheese Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Spray a 9-x-9-inch baking dish with nonstick spray. In a large mixing bowl whisk eggs for 2 minutes. Add the Canadian bacon, green onions, and spices and mix well. Pour the mixture into the baking dish and top with baby spinach and cheddar cheese. Bake for 25 minutes, or until the center of frittata is firm. Let cool for 5 minutes before cutting. Per Serving: Calories 175 (From Fat 91); Fat 10g (Saturated 4g); Cholesterol 332mg; Sodium 541mg; Carbohydrate 3g (Dietary Fiber 1g); Protein 18g; Sugar 1g.

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Wake Up Your Bariatric Pouch Gently

Article / Updated 02-14-2017

Getting your post bariatric surgery pouch ready to take on the day is not easy for some. So begin with a few sips of warm liquid such as decaf coffee, herbal tea, or warm water to allow the pouch to relax and get ready to start taking in breakfast. Fruit is about 80 percent water, so it's easy to eat. In addition, it's loaded with vitamins and minerals. Fruit doesn't provide protein, though, which is where yogurt comes in. Yogurt is a good choice for breakfast because it's fast and easy to punch up with added flavors. Even most people with lactose intolerance can eat yogurt without discomfort. Be sure to look at the labels and buy nonfat yogurt or light yogurt. Light yogurt is usually fat free and has less sugar because artificial sweetener is added. Of course, nonfat yogurt is also fat free, but it has added sugar. The nutrition facts tell you how many grams of sugar are in a serving. Lactose, or milk sugar, is naturally occurring and doesn't cause problems with dumping syndrome; the added sugars are the ones that create problems. To see if the yogurt has added sugar, check if sugar or fructose appears in the list of ingredients. Spicy Pumpkin Yogurt Stage: Smooth foods Preparation time: 5 minutes Yield: 2 servings 1 cup light vanilla yogurt 1/2 cup canned pumpkin 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon 1⁄8 teaspoon allspice 1⁄8 teaspoon ground ginger 1⁄8 teaspoon nutmeg Sugar substitute to taste 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1/2 teaspoon liquid butter extract Combine all ingredients. Chill until ready to serve. Per Serving: Calories 90 (From Fat 0); Fat 0g (Saturated 0g); Cholesterol 0mg; Sodium 70mg; Carbohydrate 16g (Dietary Fiber 3g); Protein 5g; Sugar 10g. You can substitute the light yogurt with plain nonfat yogurt or nonfat Greek yogurt. You can mix this up the night before and stick it in the refrigerator for a grab-and-go breakfast. Triple Berry Yogurt Parfait Stage: Soft foods Preparation time: 5 minutes Yield: 1 serving 4 medium strawberries, tops removed, chopped 2 tablespoons blueberries 2 tablespoons raspberries 1 or 2 packets sugar substitute, or to taste 1/4 teaspoon vanilla extract 1/2 cup light vanilla yogurt In a small bowl mix the berries, sugar substitute, and vanilla. Place half the yogurt in the bottom of an 8-ounce glass. Add half the berry mixture over the yogurt. Layer the remaining yogurt and berries. Per Serving: Calories 110 (From Fat 0); Fat 0g (Saturated 0g); Cholesterol 0mg; Sodium 65mg; Carbohydrate 22g (Dietary Fiber 3g); Protein 4g; Sugar 14g. Substitute the light yogurt with plain nonfat yogurt or nonfat Greek yogurt. Although this recipe may seem high in sugar, the sugar naturally occurs from the fruit and yogurt, not from added sugars. Berries and natural sugars are usually well tolerated after surgery, so you can enjoy this appealing recipe with strawberries, blueberries, and raspberries layered with creamy yogurt. If you make the berry mixture a day in advance, it becomes more syrupy.

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Cooking and Consuming Meat after Weight Loss Surgery

Article / Updated 02-14-2017

After your successful weight loss surgery, you need to eat foods that are high in protein but are easy for you to digest. Foods containing the highest quality protein are beef, chicken, turkey, lamb, eggs, cheese, pork, seafood, fish, shellfish, veal, and liver. Every ounce of these high-quality protein foods has 6 to 8 grams. A 3-ounce piece of chicken breast, for example, contains 21 grams of protein. Processed meats, however, such as hot dogs, bologna, salami, liverwurst, deviled ham, and others, are not high-quality protein foods. A 2-ounce hot dog, for instance, contains only 5 to 7 grams of protein. In addition, processed meats contain large amounts of fillers such as sugar and starches that may possibly cause dumping syndrome. They're also high in fat and sodium. Some of these foods have a rubbery texture that increases the chances of sticking. You can eat deli meat, but only sparingly because of the high sodium content, and choose meats that are highest in protein, such as turkey breast, ham, and top round roast beef. Other foods high in protein include dairy products, such as cheese and milk. One 8-ounce glass of milk, for instance, may have as much as 13 grams of protein. Eggs are also high in protein, with 6.5 grams. Eggs can be fried, hard-boiled, poached, scrambled, or prepared as omelets or egg salad, but you may find that certain preparation methods work better than others for you. Everyone is different, so while a hard-boiled egg may work for you, it may not work for your friend. Beef For easier consumption, beef should be cooked medium to rare. Medium is a warm, pink center, and rare is a cool, red center. When overcooked, beef loses its moisture and becomes tough, chewy, and nearly impossible for the gastric bypass patient to swallow. Ground beef also becomes difficult to digest if overcooked. As a rule, ground beef should be cooked until it turns gray, not brown. Dry heat cooking methods are recommended for all cuts of beef. If moist cooking methods are used, such as stewing or braising, expensive cuts of meat are necessary and should be cooked at low temperatures for prolonged periods of time, up to eight hours, to ensure tenderness. Poultry After surgery, you may find that when eating poultry, you prefer dark meat (legs and thighs) to white pieces (breast and wings) because the darker pieces contain more moisture and are easier to chew and swallow. However, this doesn't mean that white poultry can't be eaten, only that it has to be prepared and cooked differently to maintain moisture. When preparing white poultry, thinner cuts are better, preferably only about a quarter of an inch thick. The thickness of the meat can be adjusted by using a meat cleaver to tenderize the piece. You can also ask the butcher to slice the raw breast meat into 1/4-inch slices. Dry heat cooking methods are recommended for poultry. For thinner cuts (1/4-inch thick), sautéing is best. To sauté poultry, meat should be cooked for a minute and a half on each side in a preheated large skillet over medium-high heat. If the poultry isn't cooked through in 3 minutes, the pan wasn't hot enough or the meat was too thick. The number one reason why white-meat poultry is often too dry to eat is because it's overcooked. For thicker pieces of poultry, such as a whole bird or large cuts, rotisserie cooking, roasting, grilling, and baking are appropriate dry heat cooking methods. Cook white-meat poultry until it reaches an internal temperature of 165 degrees, and dark meat to 185 degrees. Cooking to a higher temperature than necessary dries out the poultry, and lower temperatures may leave the poultry partially uncooked. Leaving the skin on the poultry while cooking helps with flavor and moisture, but you shouldn't eat it. Skin is fat, and if consumed, you won't have enough room left in your pouch to eat the proper amount of protein. Marinating poultry in acidic marinades helps tenderize the chicken while adding flavor. And remember that leftover poultry can be used for cold salads. Pork, lamb, and liver Pork, lamb, and liver are excellent protein sources and most tender when cooked in dry heat. Pork and lamb are good meats to marinate and can be cut up and used in stir-fries or placed on skewers and grilled over medium-low heat. Both American lamb and New Zealand lamb can be found in most supermarkets and some restaurants. American sheep are fed grains, whereas New Zealand sheep eat grass. For this reason, New Zealand lamb sometimes tastes gamy and is not as sweet or tender as American lamb. Beef and chicken liver are very soft and can be made into fresh liver pâté or sautéed and seasoned. However, liver is very high in cholesterol, so consume in moderation. Lamb, liver, and pork can be used in any recipe where beef or poultry is recommended. Fish and seafood Fish (from fresh water or the sea) and shellfish such as shrimp, lobster, scallops, oysters, clams, and crab are excellent sources of protein that you will probably find easy to consume after weight loss surgery. Fish and seafood is best eaten fresh. Fish that has been frozen has less moisture and flavor. However, beware of fresh fish that smells fishy. Good fresh fish and seafood has almost no smell at all. Don't purchase or consume smelly or slimy fish. Fish and shellfish may be cooked using moist or dry cooking methods, but moist methods tend to keep the fish and seafood moist while cooking. A popular cooking method for fish is poaching, which is submerging it into a flavored liquid, such as white wine infused with dill, and cooking just below the simmering point (approximately 185 degrees). Poaching is a quick and healthy way to infuse flavor into the fish and shellfish. Other popular cooking methods include grilling, sautéing, and broiling. Most cooked fish and shellfish can be used the next day for cold salad preparations.

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Shopping Smart Aisle by Aisle After Your Weight Loss Surgery

Article / Updated 02-14-2017

Smart eating for your post bariatric surgery requires smart shopping. This means purchasing foods that are healthy, convenient, and good, which can take a little time and may make you feel totally overwhelmed. You will need to compare items and make notes. To make shopping easier, as you prepare the meals you have on your weekly menu, make notes of brands you like. You may find that other people in your family are willing to help out with the weekly shopping if you have a detailed list complete with brand names. The best buys for your nutritional buck are nutrient-rich foods. These are foods that give you a lot of nutrition for fewer calories. It often has nothing to do with how much a food costs. Even though many fast foods and processed foods are inexpensive, they cost you a lot in terms of health and weight gain. When grocery shopping for nutrient-rich foods, follow these tips: Look for foods that are as close to their original form as possible. The more foods are processed, the more vitamins and minerals have been stripped out of them. They also often lack the fiber of their less-processed counterparts. Look for foods that are in season. Strawberries in December are going to be expensive and probably not very good. Buy frozen or wait until June. Look for locally grown foods. Fruits and vegetables that have been shipped across the country have lost many of their nutrients en route. When was the last time you visited your local farmers market? Not only is it fun, but you can't get better vegetables and locally produced products. Visualize your grocery store. What do you see around the outside edge of the store? Generally, it's produce, dairy, meats, and frozen foods. Now visualize what you see in the middle. That's where you find chips, cookies, soda pop, and processed foods. Get the drift? Focus most of your shopping around the edge of the store and shop smart on the inside aisles. In general Buy foods that are the least processed you can find. Shop with a list. Don't shop when you're hungry. If possible, shop alone. Focusing on healthy foods and buying just what you need is easier without the influence of a spouse or child with a sweet tooth. Just because a food claims to be a healthy choice, doesn't always mean it is. The fronts of boxes and packaging are meant to sell items to consumers. You have to read labels! Produce When it comes to buying produce, knock yourself out! Just don't get carried away. Purchase only what you need and will eat for the week. Experimenting with fruits and vegetables you haven't tried before may introduce you to a new favorite healthy food. Look for seasonal and locally grown foods. Some produce is good eaten raw, and you can keep an eye out for produce packaged in microwavable bags to let you quickly cook vegetables for a side. Don't forget about frozen fruit and vegetables. These items can be useful later in the week when you may have eaten the fresh produce you purchased. Try to buy produce in a variety of colors — green, red, yellow, orange, and yellow. The more color you incorporate, the more vitamins, minerals, and fiber you give your body (without many calories!). Avocados are a great source of monounsaturated fats, which are heart healthy. They're also loaded with calories, so eat smart. One-eighth of an avocado is 45 calories (the same as a teaspoon of oil). Meat, poultry, and seafood Meat, poultry, and seafood are generally along the back wall of the grocery store. Look for the words round or loin (tenderloin, ground round, sirloin) when purchasing meat. These terms indicate lean cuts of meat. Fish is always a good option unless it's breaded or fried. Fatty fish (salmon and mackerel) are particularly good for you because of the omega-3 fatty acids, which are healthy fats. Go ahead and purchase poultry with the skin. It retains more moisture if cooked with the skin on. Just be sure to pull it off before eating. When purchasing ground turkey, be sure to get ground turkey breast. Some ground turkey has the skin and dark meat ground into it. Meat and fish in pouches or cans are a real time saver. They also tend to be lower in sodium than deli meats. Remember that you can also get protein from beans, tofu, and dairy like cottage cheese. Dairy The dairy aisle can be confusing. What exactly is lowfat? Is butter better than margarine? Follow these tips: Look for cheese and cream cheese that has less than 75 calories and 6 grams of fat per serving. Look for trans-fat-free margarine to use on a daily basis. You can use butter occasionally, but do it sparingly. Drink 1-percent or fat-free milk. If you're used to whole milk, this may take a little getting used to, but hang in there and it will grow on you. When buying yogurt, look for the fat-free variety with no added sugar. Greek yogurt is a great product, having twice the protein of other yogurts. It can also be used in the place of sour cream in many dishes. Grains and cereals Grains and cereals can be very confusing. How can sugary cereals be whole grain? Are all breads labeled whole wheat healthy? The truth about whole grain is really pretty simple. When purchasing bread, crackers, English muffins, pastas, and cereals, look for products that say 100% whole grain or 100% whole wheat. If a loaf of bread just says whole wheat, it's white bread with caramel coloring added to it. And sugary cereals labeled whole grain may have a little whole grain but the majority is still made of white flour. 100% is the key that ensures you'll get some good vitamins and minerals as well as fiber. If in doubt, look at the ingredients. If you see the word enriched, put it back! Center aisle staples Thought you should focus on the perimeter of the store, you have to forge into the center aisles for some foods. Many of the fats are located in the center aisles. Since oils, salad dressings, and condiments comprise much of the fat in a typical diet, knowing what you're buying is particularly important. Buy regular salad dressings with no more than 100 to 150 calories per 2-tablespoon serving. And remember that you don't have to eat 2 tablespoons; 1 is often sufficient. If you have GBP, you may get dumping syndrome from eating full-fat salad dressings. Reduced-fat dressings should have no more than 100 calories per 2 tablespoons. It's still important to measure. If you must use mayo, look for reduced-fat or fat-free versions. If you only like full fat or the salad dressing kind, measure it carefully and use sparingly. Use olive oil, peanut oil, and canola oil when you can in place of other oils. These oils are healthy, but still loaded with calories, so use sparingly! Remember that trans fats are bad for you. Even though the label may say trans fat free, look for the word hydrogenated in the ingredients. If you see this word, put it back! What about canned goods? They can be great timesavers. Contrary to what many people believe, they can also be very healthy. Vegetables for canning are picked at their peak and processed quickly; they aren't sitting on a truck for days at a time. However, canned beans, soups, and vegetables can be high in sodium. When possible, buy reduced-sodium brands. Rinse canned beans and vegetables and add back a little water before heating to serve. Doing so greatly reduces the sodium content. Purchase canned fruits that are canned in their own juice or water (not syrup). Focus on broth-based soups instead of cream-based soups. They are much lower in calories and fat. Homemade soups are super easy to make yourself and let you control the sodium and calories. You can put all the ingredients in a crockpot before you leave the house in the morning and have soup ready when you come home. Frozen foods Frozen fruits and vegetables are a great go-to food for those nights when you get in late and need to put a healthy supper on the table quickly. Like canned vegetables, these frozen alternatives can be very healthy. Avoid any that are breaded or have cream or cheese sauce on them. A plethora of frozen dinners are on the market. Many of them claim to be healthy, and some actually are. The trouble is that many are often too low in calories and pasta heavy to be satisfying, sometimes having less than 200 calories and leaving you hungry later. When checking the ingredients in a frozen meal, apply the same principles to frozen dinners that we applied to your menu. Does it have protein, whole grains, vegetables, fruit, a little fat (usually not a problem), and lowfat or fat-free dairy? If you're lucky, a typical frozen meal may have whole grains, a dab of vegetables, and a little protein. You can always pump up the calories and nutrition by adding a salad or another vegetable, a piece of fruit, and 30 minutes after the meal, a glass of milk. Look for meals that have 200 to 300 calories, less than 5 grams of saturated fat, less than 600 milligrams of sodium, and more than 15 grams of protein. Don't forget to watch the sugar! Manufacturers sneak it into everything — ketchup, spaghetti sauce, bread, salad dressings, peanut butter, and the list goes on and on. You have to look at the ingredients and look for words that indicate sugar, like dextrose, cane syrup, high fructose corn syrup, honey, and so on. If one of these words appears in the first three ingredients, avoid that food.

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Vegetable Lasagna: Easy-to-Prepare Family Meal for Weight Loss Surgery Patients

Article / Updated 02-14-2017

Not every meal needs meat, and Vegetable Lasagna is a great vegetarian dish. After your weight loss surgery, you might find it difficult to cook for your family, but you may get the kids to love their vegetables when you prepare them with cheese. After all the vegetables are cut, have the kids layer the cheese and vegetables while you make the sauce. Be sure to let cool for about 10 minutes after baking so the lasagna sets up nice and firm. For dessert, try Chocolate and Strawberry Layered Pudding. Menu: Vegetable Lasagna Garlic breadsticks Chocolate and Strawberry Layered Pudding See the following table for serving sizes: WLS Patient Kids Age 2 to 8 Older Kids and Adults Vegetable Lasagna 1/2 to 1 cup 1/4 to 1/2 cup 1 to 2 cups Garlic Breadsticks 1/4 to 1/2 breadstick 1/2 to 1 breadstick 1 to 2 breadsticks Chocolate and Strawberry Layered Pudding 1/4 to 1/2 cup 1/4 to 1/2 cup 1/2 to 1 cup Milk No beverages with meals! 1/2 to 3/4 cup 1 cup Vegetable Lasagna Stage: Soft foods Preparation time: 15 minutes Cook time: 45 minutes Yield: 8 servings 2 cups part-skim ricotta cheese 1 large egg 1 teaspoon dried Italian seasoning 2 large, fresh yellow summer squash, sliced into 1/4-inch rounds 2 large, fresh zucchini, sliced into 1/2-inch rounds 4 cups fresh baby spinach, stems removed 3 cups Cheese Sauce (see the following recipe) Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Using nonstick cooking spray, grease a 9-x-13 baking dish. In a small mixing bowl, combine ricotta cheese, egg, and Italian seasoning and mix well. Place half of the summer squash on the bottom of the pan to form a single even layer. Spread half the ricotta cheese mixture over the summer squash. Top the cheese with an even layer of half the spinach. Layer half the zucchini on top of the spinach. Repeat the layers of yellow squash, cheese, spinach, and zucchini with the remaining quantities of each. Pour cheese sauce over the top of the lasagna. Place in the preheated oven and bake uncovered for 45 minutes. Cheese Sauce 1/4 cup butter 2 cloves garlic, minced 1/2 cup all-purpose flour 1 teaspoon salt 1/2 teaspoon black pepper 3 cups nonfat milk 1 cup shredded lowfat sharp cheddar cheese Melt butter in a medium pot over medium-high heat. When it’s fully melted, add the garlic and sauté for 30 seconds. Add the flour to the pot and whisk until it forms a paste. Add salt and pepper; stir for 1 minute. Very slowly add about 1 cup of the milk, whisking constantly. When the flour mixture is smooth, add the remaining 2 cups of milk and bring to a simmer. This may take up to 5 minutes, but continue stirring constantly to keep the milk from burning to the bottom of the pan. When the mixture comes to a simmer, turn the heat down to medium low and stir in the cheddar cheese. When the cheese melts, remove the pot from heat. Per Serving:Calories 260 (From Fat 110); Fat 12g (Saturated 7g); Cholesterol 60mg; Sodium 570mg; Carbohydrate 21g (Dietary Fiber 3g); Protein 17g; Sugar 9g. Chocolate and Strawberry Layered Pudding Stage: Regular foods Preparation time: 15 minutes Chill time: 1 hour Yield: 4 servings 2 cups nonfat milk One 1-ounce package sugar-free, fat-free instant chocolate pudding mix 1 teaspoon almond extract 8 whole strawberries, stems removed, rinsed, and cut in half 1 cup light whipped topping Pour the milk into a large bowl. Add the pudding mix and almond extract and beat with a wire whisk for 2 minutes or until well blended. Let stand 5 minutes. Layer an 8-ounce glass with 1/4 cup of pudding. Add 2 strawberry halves. Repeat both layers and top with 1/4 cup whipped topping. Repeat the layers for three additional glasses. Refrigerate for 1 hour before serving. Per Serving: Calories 118 (From Fat 20); Fat 2g (Saturated 2g); Cholesterol 3mg; Sodium 142mg; Carbohydrate 18g (Dietary Fiber 1g); Protein 5g; Sugar 10g. For a change, you can use sliced bananas instead of strawberries. Either way, you'll make this recipe again and again.

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Seafood Quiche: Easy-to-Prepare Family Meal for Weight Loss Surgery Patients

Article / Updated 02-14-2017

Eggs are great, but adding veggies and seafood makes them irresistible. After you've had weight loss surgery, this crustless quiche is perfect for breakfast, brunch, or a light dinner. Have the kids mix all the ingredients and pour it into a prepared casserole pan. While the quiche is baking, start preparing your fresh fruit salad and set the table for a family meal. Menu: Crustless Seafood Quiche Fresh fruit salad Whole-wheat toast See the following table for serving sizes: WLS Patient Kids Age 2 to 8 Older Kids and Adults Crustless Seafood Quiche 1/2 cup 1/4 to 1/2 cup 1 cup Fresh Fruit Salad 2 to 4 tablespoons 1/4 to 1/2 cup 1/2 to 1 cup Whole-Wheat Toast 1/2 to 1 slice 1/2 to 1 slice 1 to 2 slices Milk No beverages with meals! 1/2 to 3/4 cup 1 cup Crustless Seafood Quiche Stage: Regular foods Preparation time: 15 minutes Cook time: 30 minutes Yield: 6 servings 4 large eggs, whisked 1 cup fat-free sour cream 1 cup part-skim ricotta cheese 1/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese 1 teaspoon onion powder 1 teaspoon nutmeg 1 cup shredded pepper jack cheese 4 ounces crabmeat, canned or fresh 4 ounces cooked bay shrimp 6 large mushrooms, thinly sliced 1 tablespoon chopped green onion 1 teaspoon lemon juice Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Spray an 8-x-8 baking dish with nonstick cooking spray. In a medium mixing bowl, combine eggs, sour cream, ricotta, Parmesan, onion powder, and nutmeg and whisk for 2 minutes or until smooth. In a small mixing bowl, combine jack cheese, crab, shrimp, mushrooms, green onions, and lemon juice and mix well. Spread seafood mixture evenly into the baking dish. Pour the egg mixture over the seafood mixture. Place the dish in the oven and bake for 30 minutes, or until a knife inserted in center comes out clean. Let stand 5 minutes before serving. Per Serving:Calories 273 (From Fat 128); Fat 14g (Saturated 8g); Cholesterol 234mg; Sodium 418mg; Carbohydrate 9g (Dietary Fiber 0g); Protein 25g; Sugar 4g. Shredded cooked chicken can be substituted for seafood. Though egg substitute can be used in many recipes, it's not a good option here because egg yolks are needed to bind the quiche. White eggs or brown? It doesn't matter! Eggshell color has nothing to do with the nutritional value, flavor, or cooking of the egg. The color of the shell comes from the breed of chicken laying the egg. White-feathered chickens with white ear lobes lay white-shelled eggs, and hens with red feathers and red ear lobes lay brown eggs.

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Broccoli Cheese Soup: Easy-to-Prepare Family Meal for Weight Loss Surgery Patients

Article / Updated 02-14-2017

This soup is a crowd pleaser and a good fit for most ages and tastes and can help make a great meal after your successful weight loss surgery. Make a double batch and enjoy for a few meals throughout the week. Menu: Broccoli Cheese Soup Whole-grain crackers Sliced apples with cinnamon See the following table for serving sizes: WLS Patient Kids Age 2 to 8 Older Kids and Adults Broccoli-Cheese Soup 1/2 to 1 cup 1/2 to 1 cup 1 to 2 cups Whole-grain crackers 1/2 ounce, crushed 1 ounce serving 1 to 2 ounces Sliced apples with cinnamon 1/4 cup 1/4 to 1/2 cup 1 cup Milk No beverages with meals! 1/2 to 3/4 cup 1 cup Broccoli Cheese Soup Stage: Soft or regular foods Preparation time: 10 minutes Cook time: 20 minutes Yield: 4 servings 1 large shallot, minced 1 tablespoon butter 1 large head broccoli or 1 pound fresh or frozen broccoli, chopped into 1- inch pieces 2 cups vegetable or chicken stock 1/4 teaspoon salt 1 large Russet potato, cubed 1/2 cup nonfat milk 1/2 cup shredded lowfat cheddar cheese In a large soup pot, add the shallot and butter on medium heat. Stir until softened. Add the broccoli, stock, salt, and potato. Simmer 15 minutes or so until broccoli softens. Turn off the heat and add the milk. With a handheld blender, blend until smooth. Stir in the cheese with a wooden spoon or spatula until melted. Per serving: Calories 150 (From Fat 41); Fat 5g (Saturated 3g); Cholesterol 11mg; Sodium 773mg; Carbohydrate 20g (Dietary Fiber 4g); Protein 10g; Sugar 4g.

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Chicken Enchiladas: Easy-to-Prepare Family Meal for Weight Loss Surgery Patients

Article / Updated 02-14-2017

Cheesy Chicken Enchiladas are the perfect dish to put on the table for brunch or dinner. And, you can work them into your menu plan after your weight loss surgery. Kids love tacos, so why not introduce them to enchiladas? After making the chicken mixture, have your kids fill and roll the enchiladas. When baked to perfection, let them cool slightly and serve with Black Bean Salsa. Menu: Cheesy Chicken Enchiladas Black Bean Salsa Brown rice See the following table for serving sizes: WLS Patient Kids Age 2 to 8 Older Kids and Adults Cheesy Chicken Enchiladas 1/2 to 1 enchilada 1/2 to 1 enchilada 1 to 2 enchiladas Black Bean Salsa 2 to 4 tablespoons 1/4 to 1/2 cup 1/2 to 1 cup Brown Rice 1 to 2 tablespoons 1/4 to 1/2 cup 1/2 cup Milk No beverages with meals! 1/2 to 3/4 cup 1 cup Cheesy Chicken Enchiladas Stage: Regular foods Preparation time: 10 minutes Cook time: 12 minutes Yield: 6 servings 8 ounces cooked and shredded boneless, skinless chicken breast 1/2 cup shredded lowfat cheddar cheese 1-1/2 cups shredded pepper jack cheese, divided Six 6-inch whole-wheat flour tortillas 1-1/2 cups Enchilada Sauce (see the following recipe) Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F. Using nonstick cooking spray, grease a 9-x-13 baking dish. In a small bowl, combine chicken, lowfat cheddar cheese, and 1/2 cup pepper jack cheese; toss until mixed well. Place 1⁄3 cup of cheese and chicken mixture into the center of one whole-wheat tortilla, tightly roll, and place seam down into the baking dish. Repeat with the remaining five tortillas. Place 1/4 cup of enchilada sauce over each stuffed enchilada and top with the remaining pepper jack cheese. Bake for 12 minutes, or until cheese is melted and bubbly. Enchilada Sauce 1/4 cup vegetable oil 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour 1/4 cup chili powder One 8-ounce can low-sodium tomato sauce 1-1/2 cups water 1/4 teaspoon ground cumin 1/4 teaspoon garlic powder 1/4 teaspoon onion powder In a small pot, heat oil over medium-high heat. When the oil is hot, add the flour and chili powder. Reduce heat to medium and cook until light brown, stirring constantly to prevent the flour from burning. Add the tomato sauce, water, cumin, garlic powder, and onion powder to the pot and stir until smooth. Continue cooking for 10 minutes, or until thickened slightly. Per serving:Calories 370 (From Fat 135); Fat 15g (Saturated 7g); Cholesterol 60mg; Sodium 540mg; Carbohydrate 31g (Dietary Fiber 4g); Protein 25g; Sugar 4g. Black Bean Salsa 1 large tomato, cut into pieces 1 tomatillo, cut into pieces 1/2 small onion, cut into small pieces 4 cloves garlic, peeled and left whole 3 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro 1/2 teaspoon cumin 6 tablespoons fresh lime juice 1 jalapeño pepper, seeded and veins removed 1/2 teaspoon salt 1 cup canned no-salt-added black beans, rinsed and drained Place all ingredients except black beans into a food processor and pulse for 15 seconds. Using a rubber spatula, wipe down the sides of the bowl and pulse for 15 more seconds. Stir in black beans. Serve 1/2 cup black bean salsa with each steak. Per serving: Calories 340 (From Fat 170); Fat 19g (Saturated 7g); Cholesterol 75mg; Sodium 490mg; Carbohydrate 17g (Dietary Fiber 4g); Protein 29g; Sugar 4g.

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Bison Sliders: Easy-to-Prepare Family Meal for Weight Loss Surgery Patients

Article / Updated 02-14-2017

Who doesn't love a juicy hamburger? The problem with most burgers is that they're super-sized and loaded with saturated fat, which is difficult to digest for those who've had weight loss surgery. Bring on bison or buffalo mini burgers for the perfect lean protein and size for anyone! Kids who grow up eating meals low in saturated fat are less likely to develop chronic heart disease. Enjoy these flavorful burgers with a side salad of lettuce, grape tomatoes, and sliced cucumbers and a nutritious dessert of Dark Chocolate Sauce with Fruit. Menu: Bison Burgers Nonfat or lowfat milk Dark Chocolate Sauce with Fruit See the following table for serving sizes: WLS Patient Kids Age 2 to 8 Older Kids and Adults Bison burger 1 ounce or 1 to 2 tablespoons chopped 1 to 2 ounces cooked 3 to 4 ounces cooked Whole-grain dinner roll 1/2 of a roll 1 roll 1 roll Nonfat or lowfat Milk No beverages with meals! 1/2 to 3/4 cup 1 cup Dark Chocolate Sauce with Fruit 1 tablespoon sauce, 1/4 cup fruit 2 tablespoons sauce, 1/4 cup fruit 1/4 cup sauce, 1/4 to 1/2 cup fruit Fruit with Dark Chocolate Sauce Stage: Soft or regular foods Preparation time: 5 minutes Cook time: 10 minutes Yield: 8 servings 1 cup cold coffee 1/2 cup unsweetened cocoa 1/2 cup sugar 2 tablespoons cornstarch 1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon almond extract or spearmint extract 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 2 cups fresh cherries, sliced bananas, strawberries, or ripe pear or apple In a medium saucepan, whisk the coffee, cocoa, sugar, and cornstarch until thickened with bubbles starting to form. Remove from the heat and add the extracts. Dip the fruit into warm or chilled sauce. Per Serving: Calories 79 (From Fat 8); Fat 1g (Saturated 0g); Cholesterol 0mg; Sodium 2mg; Carbohydrate 20g (Dietary Fiber 3g); Protein 3g; Sugar 14g.

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Home-Style Meatloaf: Easy-to-Prepare Family Meal for Weight Loss Surgery Patients

Article / Updated 02-14-2017

Meatloaf has been around for many years, but it's still a welcome addition to anyone's menu. This meatloaf recipe still has the beloved ketchup in it, but it's topped with tomato gravy, too. Kids love to work with their hands, and making meatloaf is the perfect opportunity. After having your kids wash their hands, place all the ingredients for the meatloaf into a large bowl and let them mix away. This is a perfect way to introduce different ingredients to your kids, and since they helped, they'll love to eat it. The leftovers make great sandwiches the next day. Menu: Home-Style Meatloaf with Tomato Gravy Corn on the cob Fresh strawberries See the following table for serving sizes: WLS Patient Kids Age 2 to 8 Older Kids and Adults Meatloaf with Tomato Gravy 2 to 3 ounces 1 to 2 ounces 3 ounces Corn on the Cob 1/4 medium ear 1/4 to 1/2 medium ear 1 medium ear Fresh Strawberries 2 to 4 berries 2 to 4 berries 4 to 8 berries Milk No beverages with meals! 1/2 to 3/4 cup 1 cup Home-Style Meatloaf with Tomato Gravy Stage: Regular Foods Preparation time: 15 minutes Cook time: 1-1/2 hours Yield: 8 servings 1 teaspoon olive oil 1 medium onion, diced small 3 cloves garlic, minced 2 teaspoons dried thyme 1/2 teaspoon black pepper 2 pounds lean ground beef 1 cup wheat bran 4 tablespoons ketchup 1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce 1/2 cup finely chopped flat-leaf parsley 2 large egg whites, beaten Tomato Gravy (see the following recipe) Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Coat a 9-x-5-x-3-inch loaf pan with nonstick cooking spray. Heat the olive oil in a medium skillet. Sauté the onion and garlic until translucent but not brown, about 5 minutes. Add the thyme and pepper and sauté for 2 minutes. Remove pan from heat and allow to cool. Combine the ground beef, bran, ketchup, Worcestershire sauce, parsley, and egg whites in a bowl and mix well. Stir in the cooled onion mixture. Fill the loaf pan with the beef mixture. Bake the loaf approximately 1 hour 20 minutes, until the internal temperature of the meatloaf reaches 160 degrees. Top with Tomato Gravy. Tomato Gravy 1 tablespoon canola oil 1 cup chopped onion 1/4 teaspoon black pepper One 16-ounce can no-salt-added tomato purée 1 teaspoon chopped fresh parsley 1/4 teaspoon chopped fresh thyme Heat the oil in a large sauté pan over medium-high heat. Add onion and sauté for 2 minutes. Add black pepper, tomato purée, parsley, and fresh thyme. Bring to a light simmer for 5 minutes, stirring occasionally. Per Serving: Calories 290 (From Fat 130); Fat 15g (Saturated 5g); Cholesterol 75mg; Sodium 210mg; Carbohydrate 16g (Dietary Fiber 5g); Protein 26g; Sugar 6g.

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