Steve Kaelble

Articles From Steve Kaelble

3 results
3 results
How Organizations Combat Unconscious Bias in Their Hiring Practices

Article / Updated 12-15-2022

You make your best hiring decisions when you use objective data about a job candidate’s thinking style, behavioral traits, and interests. Sure, a candidate’s experiences and how they perform in interviews are meaningful, but those aspects are far more prone to unconscious bias. To ensure you and your organization align with industry best practices, a validated hiring and selection tool with data-driven insights is essential. Just know that you may be a bit biased, and it’s likely you’re not even aware of some of your biases. Pretty much everyone has what are known as unconscious biases — stereotypes and attitudes that are impacted by past experiences, even things people have forgotten. In the context of hiring and selection, unconscious bias can lead your organization to inadvertently overlook great candidates. It can also derail efforts to create a diverse and equitable workforce. What is unconscious bias? Unconscious bias refers to automatic associations anyone may make involving characteristics such as race, age, gender, disability, height, weight, accent, beliefs derived from prior experiences, even college attended — and how those associations impact interactions with others in those groups. Confirmation bias: The tendency to see information as validating a preexisting belief Affinity bias: The tendency to favor individuals who share your beliefs, experiences, or appearance Halo/horns effect: The tendency to take a look at just one specific trait and end up seeing the person’s overall character as positive or negative These biases may be hidden so well in a person’s automatic actions that they’re not easy to even recognize, much less do something about. But unconscious biases get in the way of hiring diverse, qualified candidates. How to reduce the bias Bias isn’t inherently right or wrong — it’s a normal part of the way our brains interpret patterns and associations. But you need to pay more attention to what your unconscious brain is up to. Many companies offer workforce training on recognizing and dealing with biases. To create a more inclusive and welcoming environment, it’s vital for everyone on the team to be aware of their own biases and work to keep them from impacting how they interact with colleagues and customers. Training and other awareness-raising efforts are not a complete solution, however. There may also be structural issues that open the door to bias. Hiring processes are among those corporate structures that enable bias. How prevalent is unconscious bias? Research and surveying by PXT Select reflect just how prominent this issue is. In one survey, about nine out of ten respondents identified hiring and selection as the number-one organizational process that could be affected by unconscious bias. Recruitment, promotion, and succession planning are potential trouble spots, too, along with interviewing and résumé screening. That’s why it’s so important to create structured, data-driven hiring processes. That includes always using clearly defined hiring criteria, tapping into assessments and other rich sources of data, conducting structured interviews, and including interviewers with diverse backgrounds. Structured processes help hiring managers select the best candidates and reduce the impact of unconscious bias. For example, the data-focused assessments provided through PXT Select yield numerical projections about candidate job fit, steering clear of potentially biased judgments. They also allow interviewers to prepare in a structured manner that’s less likely to be impacted by bias. How do I learn more about unconscious bias? To learn more about how to combat bias in the hiring process, download our free e-book Hiring Successfully For Dummies, PXT Select Special Edition.

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The Secret to Avoiding a Hiring Disaster: Job Fit

Article / Updated 12-15-2022

Making the right hiring choice is essential for your organization because making the wrong one can be downright disastrous. What is job fit? Your goal should be to hire the right person for the job to be done — this concept is known as job fit. Job fit is the ideal approach for selecting a candidate and includes matching their skills and personal characteristics to those needed to excel at a particular job. Without job fit, it is much less likely the person will find the job fulfilling. When a person is not fulfilled in their role, it leads to disengagement, low satisfaction, poor performance, and ultimately, turnover. What is the cost of a bad hire? The cost of hiring poorly can be staggering. The U.S. Department of Labor estimates that the cost of a bad hire could amount to 30 percent of a first-year salary. For managerial roles, that cost could be up to 50 percent. A bad hire may mean mediocre job performance, poor productivity, or low accuracy. Add in the time wasted on onboarding and coaching the bad hire, plus the cost of onboarding a replacement. You may also see negative impacts on relationships with clients and brand reputation. A bad hire can also torpedo employee engagement, which, in turn, can lead to costly turnover of other key contributors. How is the job fit approach different than traditional approaches? Hiring is more of a guessing game if you’re going about it with inadequate data. If you’re counting on the traditional tools of a résumé and an interview or two, you’re likely to end up relying too much on intuition. The job-fit approach is your ticket to hiring confidently. Seeking job fit means exploring each candidate’s innate talents, behavioral tendencies, and interests in the context of the job for which they’re being considered. You’re exploring: Whether the candidate can do the job How well the candidate will do the job Whether the candidate will enjoy the job All of these job-fit factors can actually be measured more objectively than you may realize. That’s the approach taken through the PXT Select solution. How can you achieve job fit? The process of achieving job fit begins with creating a performance model for the job. A performance model is a picture of the ideal candidate, setting targets for measurable characteristics of thinking style, behavioral traits, and interests. Then you assess each applicant through computerized adaptive testing (CAT). That results in fit scores to all of the areas spelled out in the performance model, as well as an overall fit percentage to the role. How will obtaining job fit help me? You can imagine how valuable this kind of data can be in comparing one candidate to another. It also can help you find a better role for a candidate who is great in many ways but not the best fit for a particular job. The PXT Select reports also help during the interview process by generating suggested questions based on the candidates’ responses. Through job fit, not only are you better equipped to replicate your top talent, but you also gain insights for discovering the next generation of leaders. Employee retention, talent mobility, promotions, and business succession all are selection processes, and job fit can facilitate these processes. Developing existing talent is particularly important in times of labor shortages. The more your organization looks inward for talent, the more successful you’ll be in any labor marketplace. Job fit is a powerful tool to enable that success. How can I learn more about job fit? To read more about job fit, replicating top talent, and finding the next generation of leaders for your organization, download Hiring Successfully For Dummies, PXT Select Special Edition.

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How to Hire Top Performers

Article / Updated 12-15-2022

The basic aim of the hiring process is to find and select the best fit for the job to be done — a concept known as job fit. Job fit is determined by how closely an individual’s innate talents, behavioral tendencies, and interests align with those predictive of success in a particular role. Essentially, job fit helps you determine if someone can do the job and if they will find fulfillment in the job. But before you can know for sure if they can do the job or if they will find it fulfilling, you need to identify what talents, behaviors, and interests are typical for success in that role. What you really need to accomplish this is a performance model. What is a performance model? The performance model is your recipe for hiring successfully and avoiding all the adverse outcomes that result from a bad hire. The performance model outlines the most desirable traits, which are then used to compare against candidates for the job. There are a few ways to create performance models, but perhaps the most important is the alignment of key stakeholders in the organization on what they need to see from this job What does a performance model measure? A résumé and an interview can inform you about a candidate’s background and experience. What’s missing, though, is objective data indicating how well an individual can do a job and how fulfilling it will be for them. That’s where your performance model steps in, helping you tie individual performance to business strategy by spelling out the required thinking style, behavioral traits, and interests. What cognitive characteristics are assessed through the performance model? Thinking style measures four cognitive characteristics: Verbal skill gauges how a person communicates with others. Verbal reasoning gets into how the person uses words to create relationships between concepts, process messages, and draw conclusions. Numerical ability has to do with numerical calculations. Numerical reasoning explores how a person uses numbers and calculations to solve problems. What behavioral traits are assessed through the performance model? Behavioral traits indicate what a candidate is like on the job. The PXT Select, for example, measures nine behaviors and delivers a fit score comparing how closely aligned a candidate is to the role. Behavioral scales are specific to each job because job requirements are unique and may require a person to lean more one way or the other in one or more of the following areas: Pace: Steady or urgent Assertiveness: Unassuming or forceful Sociability: Reserved or outgoing Conformity: Strong-willed or compliant Outlook: Skeptical or trusting Decisiveness: Deliberate or bold Accommodation: Steadfast or agreeable Independence: Reliant or autonomous Judgment: Intuitive or factual Why are a person’s interests important to factor in the performance model? Interests are also an essential component of the performance model. Interests help predict motivation and potential satisfaction with a given job. The more the person’s interests align with the job’s requirements, the more they will enjoy it. This is critical because we know that people who are happier in their jobs are more productive, more effective, and more engaged. The PXT Select approach considers six interests to help determine job fit: creative, enterprising, financial/administrative, people service, mechanical, and technical. How to build a performance model You can build a performance model by assessing your existing top performers in the role to identify what makes them stars. You then use what you learned from the data to hire others with similar DNA. Building performance models this way is referred to as replicating or cloning top performers. Replicating top performers is among the most effective methods of building performance models because it uses people in the role within the organization who are experiencing success. If you don’t have a big enough sample size of existing stars in that role or you’re recruiting for a completely new position, it isn’t a problem. PXT Select has a library of performance models for many different roles created using O*NET occupational data and other proven methods for creating customized models. How to use assessment results to find the right candidate After you have the performance model to find who you’re looking for, the next step is to assess candidates and identify the best fit. Assessment results offer objective data on how each candidate fits the job requirements and how they compare with one another. Still, selection assessments should never be used as your only tool for hiring. An individual’s prior experience and how they present themselves in the interview should be given equal consideration in any hiring decision. An effective selection tool should also give hiring managers resources and information to enhance and assist during the interview process. PXT Select reports provide you with suggested interview questions to help you focus on areas where things may not be so straightforward or other challenge areas identified in the data. The bottom line is that a performance model is the best way to compare candidates consistently, helping you make unbiased and equitable hiring decisions. PXT Select goes even further by providing you tools (unique reports) for onboarding, coaching, and even up-skilling (sales and leadership) your workforce. How can I learn more about performance models and hiring top talent? To learn more, download Hiring Successfully For Dummies, PXT Select Special Edition.

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