Customer Experience For Dummies
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What is customer service efficiency? How can you determine what “efficient customer service” is? In order to answer these questions, first you need to define what customer service efficiency looks like.

Consider several key questions in evaluating how efficient your organization is with respect to effective customer service:

  • How efficiently your customers access your products and services — is it easy, simple, fast, error free, user friendly, and cordial?

  • How efficiently your company processes information, related to:

    • Order fulfillment, delivery, confirmation, and tracking

    • Customer information — buying tendencies, interests

    • Self help, Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

    • Response to questions, inquiries

  • How efficiently your company tracks and executes change management of:

    • Customer and market desires, new requirements

    • Product and services — changes in design, development, creation, provision, delivery, and effectiveness

  • How efficiently your company manages financial aspects, such as:

    • Billing — is it easy, simple, fast, error free?

    • Customer accounts — tracking, reporting, customer access

One common way to determine efficiency in customer service is to look at how easy it is for customers to find and buy your products and services, and contact you if they have any questions. In other words, how easy are you to reach?

Another way to determine efficiency is to look at how easily customers can locate, purchase, confirm, track, receive, and complete their orders without any assistance. How well can they find answers to key questions regarding your products and services totally by themselves at their convenience, not just during normal business hours?

Of course, when customers do contact you, another measure of efficiency is to determine how well you respond to them in terms of timeliness, accuracy, and issue resolution.

Becoming customer-centric is a process that requires focus, effort, and action in certain strategic areas.

About This Article

This article is from the book:

About the book authors:

Roy Barnes is one of the leading authorities on customer experience design and performance management. He has more than 25 years of experience delivering world class results in both the for-profit and nonprofit sectors. Bob Kelleher is the founder of The Employee Engagement Group, a global consulting firm that works with leadership teams to implement best-in-class leadership and employee engagement programs. He is the author of Louder Than Words and Creativeship, as well as Employment Engagement For Dummies. Kelleher is also a thought leader, keynote speaker, and consultant.

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