By Marsha Collier

Please credit any website and the person behind the post when you share the content. You can generally do so by including a link back to the original posting of the content, or in the case of Twitter, thank the person who originally posted it.

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When you want to link to a YouTube video, you can type the @ (at-sign) before you type the name you want to credit. When you do that on Facebook, the names of your friends show up in a drop-down menu.

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When you see the person’s name you want to include, click it, and the full name appears in your post. Doing this also causes the post to appear on your friend’s Timeline page. It’s what the kids call giving a little Facebook love.

Suppose you want to share a video elsewhere online. Besides mentioning the original poster by name in your blog text, you can include the name in the keywords area of your blog. And when you do, the credit gets back to him or her through Google+.

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When you’re looking around on the web, you’ll no doubt see a Creative Commons license badge on independent websites. Creative Commons is a nonprofit organization that works to increase the amount of content “in the commons — the body of work that is available to the public for free and legal sharing, use, repurposing, and remixing.”

When you see a Creative Commons license icon, click it, and you’ll be brought to a page where the actual license appears. This license tells you if there are any restrictions about the content that you may want to share.

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The Creative Commons license is represented by three basic icons; the license details are based on the order in which the icons appear. The following list outlines a simple shortcut to the Creative Commons license rules.

The Attribution icon means you may distribute, remix, tweak, and build upon the work, even commercially, as long as you credit the original creation:

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The Share Alike icon means you may distribute, remix, tweak, and build upon the work, even commercially, as long as you credit the original creation, with this caveat: You credit and license new creations under the identical terms:

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The No Derivatives icon means you may redistribute, commercially and non-commercially, as long as the work is passed along unchanged and in whole, with credit to the author:

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The Non-Commercial icon means you may remix, tweak, and build upon the work non-commercially only.

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The Non-Commercial — Share Alike icon means you may remix, tweak, and build upon the work non-commercially, as long as you credit and license new creations under the identical terms. You can download and redistribute the work as is, but you can also translate, make remixes, and produce new creations based on the work”

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The Non-Commercial — No Derivatives icon: This license is often called the free advertising license because it allows download of works and sharing as long as the distributor credits and links back to the original. The work can’t be changed in any way or used commercially.

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