Related Infographics: Telling a Relevant Tale

By Justin Beegel, MBA, The Infographic World Team

You may not wish to rush into production with an extremely timely infographic. After all, that’s a major commitment of resources. Instead, maybe you want to take a news event, find a somewhat related topic, and develop an infographic inspired by the news event.

When choosing these tangentially related topics, explore potentially unseen or previously unconsidered aspects of an event. Use the news event as a point of departure, allowing your topic to have a life of its own while still retaining a sense of timeliness.

In other words, don’t take on the news event directly. Take a different view of it. Broad ideas in this vein include

  • The business of <fill in the blank>

  • <fill in the blank> around the world

  • The evolution of <fill in the blank>

    • By state

    • And kids

    • And elderly people

  • The future of <fill in the blank>

Approaches like this allow you to take advantage of the built-in popularity of current events while expanding the overall lifespan of your infographic. You’ll get the best of both worlds, giving your infographic a ready-made audience in the short term and allowing the audience to continue building even after the immediate interest fades.

You don’t have to even mention the news event in your infographic in many cases. Otherwise, you run the risk of the piece immediately becoming outdated in the case of rapidly developing news. The ideal approach is to make the infographic appear as though it were planned all along and is simply benefitting from fortuitous timing.