How to Devise a Landing-Page Strategy for Your Facebook Ads - dummies

How to Devise a Landing-Page Strategy for Your Facebook Ads

By John Haydon

If you’re familiar with online marketing, you understand the importance of making a good first impression with your Facebook ad link. Your landing page (as it’s known in advertising) is the page that opens when users click your ad. It can be an internal Facebook Page or an external website. All engagement begins on the landing page.

Successful landing pages provide an easy path to conversion, or realizing your goal. A conversion can include capturing user data via an input form, driving membership for your Page, getting people to sign a petition, or simply making a sale. Regardless of your objective, if your landing page doesn’t deliver the desired result, your campaign is worthless.

Facebook allows you to create ads that link to an internal Facebook location or an external website (URL).

Landing on a Facebook location

As a best practice when running a Facebook Ad campaign, link your ads to an internal Facebook location as opposed to an external website. For internal Facebook Ads, you can link to a Facebook Page, a Facebook Page update, an app Page, or an event Page.

If you’re advertising a Facebook Page, you can send users to a customized landing tab within your Page. Here is the Post Planner landing page, which features a live training session.

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The bottom line is to bring visitors to your Facebook Page, where they’re just one click away from becoming fans. Because you have access to your fans’ profiling data, your fan base can become an extremely valuable marketing asset.

Keep these three things in mind to increase conversions on your custom tab:

  • Include only one call to action. Present users too many options, and they’re less likely to take the action you want them to take. If you want them to join an email list, don’t also ask them to follow you on Twitter.

  • Use as few words as possible. Most of the time, you should be able to cut your copy by 50 percent, which is easy to do when you think about what users need to know versus information that’s peripheral to that action. If users are entering their email addresses as a way to join a contest, for example, email them later with the less-important details about that contest.

  • Measure conversions. If you’re focusing on acquiring emails on your custom tab, make sure that you create a unique web form for the tab. Most quality email marketing services allow you to track how many people are joining a list via each web form.

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Landing on a website

Facebook allows you to refer your ad visitors to an external web address (URL), provided that it adheres to the Facebook’s advertising policies and guidelines.

Linking to an outside website offers you greater control of your landing page’s content, technology, and design. You may already have a finely tuned landing page that you prefer to drive ad traffic to, regardless of where the traffic originated, and you can employ much more sophisticated web analytics on your site than are presently available on Facebook.

Because ads can be purchased on a CPC basis, you can opt to pay only when a user clicks through to your Page, regardless of whether it’s an internal Facebook Page or a page on an outside website.

Making sure that your website is responsive

On a responsive website, the content (pages, text, videos, and photos) automatically resizes in response to the particular device that a viewer is using. Any website that you can easily view on both a mobile device and a web browser is responsive.

These days, having a responsive design is more important than ever, and it will continue to be important as an increasing percentage of Facebook users access the site on their mobile devices. Currently, more than 75 percent of the 1.3 billion Facebook users access the site from a mobile device each month.

If a user clicks over to your website and it isn’t responsive, he will be more likely to leave your website instead of buying your product or service, or joining your email list.