Samsung Galaxy S10 For Dummies book cover

Samsung Galaxy S10 For Dummies

By: Bill Hughes Published: 05-29-2019

The bestselling guide to your new Samsung 

This book documents all the features and capabilities of Samsung Galaxy S10 device, approaching them from the point of view of a user who is intimidated by the technology and baffled by the documentation and online support that comes with the phones. All aspects of the suite of devices are covered, from setup and configuration, to extensive use of the phone features and capabilities:  texting, e-mailing, accessing the Internet, maps, navigation, camera and video, social networking, taking pictures, watching movies, downloading apps, synching with a PC, and expanding the phone's potential with new software releases.

The accessible and fun writing style provides clear direction and doesn't hinder the book's important content and coverage. Readers will keep this book close by, referring to it often as they explore the features of their new Samsung Galaxy S10 smartphone. 

  • Navigate your phone
  • Use mobile data technology
  • Send and receive messages
  • Have fun with apps 

If you’re baffled by the documentation and online support that comes with your phone, your solution is here!

Articles From Samsung Galaxy S10 For Dummies

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Samsung Galaxy S10 For Dummies Cheat Sheet

Cheat Sheet / Updated 03-28-2022

Your Samsung Galaxy S10 smartphone allows you to do many of the same things as previous versions of the Galaxy. You can change the font size for texting conversations and take selfies. You can also access Galaxy applications while you’re talking on the S10. Use this Cheat Sheet as a handy reference for some of its popular functions.

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How to Use Samsung Pay on the Galaxy S10

Article / Updated 10-15-2019

The first step in the process is to make sure that you have Samsung Pay on your Galaxy S10. As cool as this app is, there are many options to this technology, and your carrier may have preferred to not have it preloaded. No problem. You can download applications from the Play Store. The Samsung Pay logo is seen here. It is easy to confuse Samsung Pay and Google Pay. These are two different applications. Google Pay is nice, but it does not have the Magnetic Secure Transmission capability that allows you to use mobile payments at many more retailers. The app page description is shown here. When you tap Install, you get the image on the right. The Samsung Pay app works a little different than most other apps. The first time you open Samsung Pay, you will be given information on how to use it and be asked to put in your credit card information (in a very convenient way, by the way) and asked all kinds of permissions and agreements. Once you have given all this information, Samsung Pay waits patiently at the bottom of your home pages, ready to meet your payment needs with nothing more than a quick swipe from the bottom of the screen. Most people would simply not use this app if they had to go digging through their screens to find the app. This way, you do not have to search to find the app and wait for it to come up. The following figure shows the Home screen with the Samsung Pay launch button sitting at the bottom ready to appear with a quick flick. The launch button is also there on the Lock screen, so you don’t even need to unlock your phone because you’ll be using the exact same security steps before you can use your credit card. How to set up Samsung Pay When you open the Samsung Pay app, you’re greeted with a series of pages before you get to the Home screen seen in the following figure. These pages include marketing introductions (which you don’t need because you read this article), permissions and agreements (which you should give if you want to move forward), and some pages that verify that Samsung Pay can work on your phone. The app wants to make sure that your phone has the right parts (your Galaxy S10 does, but that is not the case for every Android phone) and that you are in one of the 24 countries where Samsung Pay is accepted. You’re set if you’re in the United States, Canada, Puerto Rico, or China. You’re out of luck if you’re in, say, Yemen. Being in these countries is important for this app because each country has its own set of laws for payments, and Samsung may not have all the arrangements in place if you are not in one of these countries. New countries will be added as quickly as possible. Read the agreements. In all likelihood, they are the same kind of agreements that exist in the fine print in your existing credit card and every time you sign your name to a credit card charge slip that affirms you won’t pull any shenanigans. The next part of the initial setup process is to step through how you want to set up security. You have two security options when you are making a transaction: using your fingerprint or entering a PIN. There are a few scenarios where using a Samsung Pay PIN rather than a fingerprint might make sense. In most cases, using your fingerprint is exceptionally convenient. If you’ve already set biometric security options up in your phone, you see the following screen. If you haven’t set these up yet, the Samsung Pay application will walk you through the steps to do so. It’s quick and easy. The next step is to enter your credit card information. When you tap the link that says Add Payment Card, you will be taken to a screen that lets you take an image of your credit card. The left image is when the screen first comes up and the right image is when you have the desired credit card in the viewfinder. The app then interprets the information on the front of your credit card and populates as many screens as possible with your credit card information. It will ask you to fill out the form seen in the following figure if it can’t figure out the information on your card or the information is on the reverse side of the card. Not every company that offers credit cards is signed up with Samsung Pay. You can check the Samsung website or tap the link in the figure to check before you proceed. Otherwise, just go ahead and see whether things go through. Tap Next, and Samsung Pay will seek to confirm things with your credit card company. This does not cost you anything. It just wants to make sure that when you do make a charge, everything will flow smoothly. One of the things the company will want to verify is that you are authorized to use that credit card. This means that either you need to be the primary cardholder or you need to coordinate with that person. Keep in mind that scanning your fingerprint and tapping your phone on a credit card reader has the same legal implications as actually signing a credit slip. When the credit card company verifies that everything is on the up and up, you get an acknowledgement like the one shown. How to use Samsung Pay First, pick something to buy at a store. Have a clerk ring it up and tell him you will pay with a credit card. Swipe the screen upward. You see the screen seen here. Enter your fingerprint by pressing the icon, and you see a screen similar to the one shown here. As seen in the figure, you should either hold your phone against where the credit card reader would read the magnetic stripe or where there is the contactless payment system logo if it is available. The semicircle above your signature will start counting down, and your phone will vibrate to let you know that it is transmitting. You will hear a beep if it all goes through. If it fails for some reason, you can try again simply by reentering your security option. This process works with the vast majority of credit card readers. This does not work well, however, with credit card readers where you insert your card into the machine and pull it out quickly. This type of reader is mostly used on gasoline pumps. Sorry. How to manage Samsung Pay As long as you pay your credit card bills and keep your credit card account at the bank, this app is relatively self-sufficient. Still, you will need to access the app settings from time to time. You get there by tapping the Samsung Pay logo on the app screen. To add a new credit or debit card, tap the Add link. Adding a second card is easy, and the images will stack up when above each other on this page. The quick launch link brings up whatever card is on the top. If you want to change to use a different credit card, you can flip through the options. You tap the three dots to get a pop-up for the settings of Samsung Pay and select Settings. The settings page is shown in the following figure. If you want to change the settings for or delete a credit card, all you have to do is tap on the Manager Favorite Cards link. All the information associated with that card will appear in the screen. Enjoy your spending!

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The Google Play Store: The Mall for Your Samsung Galaxy S10

Article / Updated 10-15-2019

The Play Store is set up and run by Google, mainly for people with Android phones. Adding an app to your phone is similar to adding software to your PC. In both cases, a new app (or software) makes you more productive, adds to your convenience, and/or entertains you for hours on end — sometimes for free. Not a bad deal. There are some important differences, however, between installing software on a PC and getting an app on a cellphone: Smartphone apps need to be more stable than computer software because of their greater potential for harm. If you buy an app for your PC and find that it’s unstable (for example, it causes your PC to crash), sure, you’ll be upset. If you were to buy an unstable app for your phone, though, you could run up a huge phone bill or even take down the regional cellphone network. Can you hear me now? There are multiple smartphone platforms. These days, it’s pretty safe to assume that computer software will run on a PC or a Mac or both. On the other hand, because of the various smartphone platforms out there, different versions within a given platform aren’t always compatible. The Play Store ensures that the app you’re buying will work with your version of phone. How to get to the Google Play Store You can access the Play Store through your Galaxy S10 phone’s Play Store app or through the Internet. The easiest way to access the Play Store is through the Play Store app on your Galaxy S10 phone. The icon is shown in the following figure. If the Play Store app isn’t already on your Home screen, you can find it in your Apps list. To open it, simply tap the icon. When you tap the Play Store icon, you’re greeted by the screen looking something like what is shown. As new apps become available, the highlighted apps will change, and the Home page will change from one day to the next. In addition, the good folks at Google spend a lot of time thinking about what is the best way to help the hundreds of millions of Android users find the best application from the selection of 3.5 million apps. This is no small task. Some of those users are very experienced and know just what they want. Others are walking in the door for the first time while still others are just coming to browse and see whether anything strikes their fancy. The goal for Google is to make every user who comes in find what they want. The goal in this book is to give you enough information so that you can be comfortable downloading your first app and then comfortable finding other interesting apps as you become more familiar with the layout. What’s available: shopping for Android apps The panorama that exists for the Google Play home page is very extensive. You can swipe to the right a long way and you can swipe down dozens of levels. Do not be surprised if you open up the Play Store home page one day and find that it has a completely different layout. Google tries different formats from time to time to solve one problem or another and keep things fresh. The chances are good that the lower level categories are still there, and you can find what you are looking for, even if the structure described is no longer exactly accurate. The preceding figure shows several top-level categories (plus a few more that are off to the right): Home: This is a catch-all category. It includes the apps for productivity, information, social connection, or enjoyment. Games: Games are applications in which you’re are an active participant. Movies & TV: The Google Play Store is a great source for video entertainment. Music: Likewise, the Google Play Store is a great source for audio entertainment. Books: This is the section for audiobooks and e-books. Audiobooks are the smartphone version of books on tape, where a person reads you the book. E-books allow you to use your smartphone as an e-reader. Newsstand: This section is where you can subscribe to your favorite newspaper, magazine, or other periodical. Navigating the Google Play home page When you’ve decided that you want to look at apps, you see the following options when you tap the link for one of the top-level categories: Top Charts: These are the best-selling apps. This is often a good indication that you may want to give it a try. Family: If you’re looking for apps suitable for kids, go here. Categories: This option takes you to a hierarchy of application types that is useful if you already know what you want to add. There is more on these different categories later in this chapter. Editors’ Choice: While relying on sales volumes in Top Charts is one way to find apps you may find valuable, this section is curated, hopefully with people who think like you. Early Access: Let’s say that you’ve reviewed 3.4 million apps, and you just haven’t found the right one for you. You can look at the apps that have just been added to the Google Play virtual shelves by accessing this section. These are the newest apps in the store. Google is doing its best to help you find the app you need among its inventory of hundreds of thousands of choices. Today’s version of the Play Store has a link called Categories where you can start digging by app type. Art & Design: These apps let you exercise the powerful graphics process to make some cool images, from the abstract to the practical, such as floorplans. Augmented Reality: These apps give you the chance to use your camera lens and see things that are not there (in a good way). Auto & Vehicles: We love our cars. These apps help you buy them for less, enjoy them more, and enjoy them for a longer time. Beauty: These apps offer tips and techniques on how to look that much better. Comics: These apps are meant to be funny. Hopefully, you find something that tickles your funny bone. Communication: Yes, the Galaxy S10 phone comes with many communications apps, but these Play Store apps enhance what comes with the phone — for example, tools that automatically send a message if you’re running late to a meeting or text you if your kids leave a defined area. Dating: This the modern way to meet that special someone, or at least someone more interesting that Saturday night TV. Education: To quote Emil Faber, “Knowledge is good.” Entertainment: Not games per se, but these apps are still fun: trivia, horoscopes, and frivolous noisemaking apps. (These also include Chuck Norris facts. Did you know that Chuck Norris can divide by 0?) Finance: This is the place to find mobile banking apps and tools to make managing your personal finances easier. Food & Drink: Here is the place to find the best restaurants and obtain the best recipes. Health & Fitness: This is a category for all apps related to mobile medical apps, including calorie counters, fitness tracking, and tools to help manage chronic conditions, such as diabetes. Lifestyle: This category is a catchall for apps that involve recreation or special interests, like philately or bird-watching. Maps & Search: Many apps tell you where you are and how to get to where you want to go. Some are updated with current conditions, and others are based on static maps that use typical travel times. Multimedia: The Galaxy S10 comes with music and video services, but nothing says you have to like them. You may prefer offerings that are set up differently or have a selection of music that isn’t available elsewhere. News & Weather: You’ll find a variety of apps that allow you to drill down until you get just the news or weather that’s more relevant to you than what’s available on your extended Home screen. Productivity: These apps are for money management (such as a tip calculator), voice recording (such as a stand-alone voice recorder), and time management (for example, an electronic to-do list). Reference: These apps include a range of reference books, such as dictionaries and translation guides. Think of this section as similar to the reference section of your local library or bookstore. Shopping: These apps give you rapid access to mobile shopping sites or allow you to do automated comparison shopping. Social: These are the social networking sites. If you think you know them all, check here just to be sure. Of course, you’ll find Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and Pinterest, but you’ll also find dozens of other sites that are more narrowly focused and offer apps for the convenience of their users. Software Libraries: Computers of all sizes come with software libraries to take care of special functions, such as tools to manage ringtones, track app performance, and protect against malware. Sports: You can find sports sites to tell you the latest scores and analyses in this part of the Play Store. Themes: Your phone comes with color schemes, or This part of the Play Store offers a broader selection. Tools: Some of these apps are widgets that help you with some fun capabilities. Others are more complicated and help you get more functionality from your phone. Travel: These apps are useful for traveling, including handy items, such as currency translations and travel guides. Then there are the curated categories, which change over time. The Google Play Store does its best to keep these categories fresh and customized for your needs and tastes. The Play Store’s algorithms aren’t always perfect. For some reason, they keep showing me curated apps related to fashion, personal hygiene, and self-grooming. This has to be a mistake. Many of your favorite websites are now offering apps that are purpose-built for your phone. You can use the full site with your high-resolution screen or use the mobile version. An alternative is to download the app for that website, and it will present the information you want from that website on your phone in a way that is even easier to access. In fact, when you enter a website, your phone will look to see if you have the corresponding app. If so, you phone automatically opens the app for you. Cool! Navigating the Google Play games page There are lots and lots of options for entertainment in this section, which you access by tapping the Games link shown in the preceding figure. They’re categorized as follows: For You: This is Google, so they have computers that take what they know about you so far and make a list of what may appeal to you based on that information. Top Charts: As with apps, these are the best sellers among games. It’s a good place to start. New: This is like Early Access for apps, but for games. Premium: These are the games that you can use for a price. Some are one-time fees; others involve ongoing charges. The benefit of paying for some game titles is that you don’t have to ignore ads. In other cases, the free games offer you just a taste of what you would get, and all the really cool things are only available when you pay the piper. Categories: This option takes you to a hierarchy of application types — useful if you already know what you want to add. I offer more info on the different categories later in this chapter. Family: This is an entire section for games to keep the kids happy. Your Galaxy S10 phone takes interactive gaming to a new level. Games in this section of the Play Store fall into the following categories: Arcade & Action: Think of games that are based on what you find in arcades: shooting games, racing games, and other games of skill and/or strategy. Brain & Puzzle: Think crossword puzzles, Sudoku, and other word or number games. Cards & Casino: You can find an electronic version of virtually every card or casino game. (If you know of any game that’s missing, let me know so that I can write the app and sell it to the three people who play it.) Casual: This crossover category includes simpler games, some of which are also arcade, action, or cards, but are distinguished by the ease with which you can pick them up, play them, and then put them down. Solitaire may be the most widespread example of a casual game. Educational: Who says games can’t be educational, too? That would not include anyone who has browsed this section! Music: Here are the music-based games you were looking for. Racing: Who needs one of those game consoles to race cars when you have your S10? Role Playing: This is the place to look if you want an immersive game that will take you to a new world. Sports: You can find sports sites to tell you the latest scores or find you fantasy sports leagues. Strategy: If you want to find how clever you are (or aren’t), strategy games are for you. Think chess or bridge, but on your S10. Trivia: What was the name of the high school in Welcome Back, Kotter? Which is larger: the moon or Pluto? If these questions capture your imagination, this is your new favorite category. Travel: These apps are useful for traveling, including handy items, such as currency translations and travel guides. Below the subcategories are rows of curated game categories. If you find a row that you like, you can start scrolling to the right to see the options within that curated category. Hopefully, the curator thinks like you do and can offer you lots of suggestions. This is particularly handy if you’re not sure what you want. Free apps are great. But don’t be afraid of buying any apps that you’re going to use frequently. Apps usually cost very little, and the extra features may be worth it. Some people have an irrational resistance to paying $1.99 monthly for something they use all the time. Frankly, this is a little silly. Let’s all be rational and be willing to pay a little bit for the services we use.

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Put Bixby to Work on Your Samsung Galaxy S10

Article / Updated 10-15-2019

So, how does Samsung Bixby work? Say, you want to call someone. In the old days, high-end mobile phones would require you to train the voice-recognition software to understand the basics of how you speak. No more. Just tell Bixby who you want to call, by pressing and holding the Bixby button on the left side of your phone and saying, “Call Bill.” Be ready. In just a moment, your Samsung Galaxy S10 calls Bill. It’s that easy. However, if you know several people named Bill, your phone asks you (in a semi-pleasant voice) which “Bill” you want to call. You may have heard of “Siri” on the iPhone. Siri responds to questions you ask it. The Bixby app is the same idea, except it responds to the name “Bixby.” After you teach Bixby your voice with a few basic commands, all you have to do is say, “Hi, Bixby.” If you want to call Bill Boyce, a person from your contact list, say “Hi, Bixby. Call Bill Boyce.” Within a moment, his phone rings. How to set up Bixby for your voice From the Bixby Settings page, scroll down to Voice Wake-up and toggle the button to on. The screen shown in the following figure appears. When you’re ready, tap the Bixby logo. You’ll be asked to say “Hello, Bixby” a few times, as well as a few other phases. Then it’s ready to go. You simply say, “Hi, Bixby” followed by your request. Dictating a text with Bixby To send a text, say the words, “Hi, Bixby. Send a text.” Done. The text screen pops up. Bixby asks you, “Who would you like to message?” Give the name. It looks up their number from your contact list. I say, “Ludwig van Beethoven.” Bixby then asks you for your message. Go ahead and say what you would have typed. Bixby then converts your words into a message. It displays what it thinks you said in a box, as shown. Read it before you send it. If it is correct, just say “Send” and off it goes. If it’s incorrect, you can say “Cancel,” and it won’t send that message. You can then try again. It’s that easy. Give it a try! Tasks you can do with Bixby Texting is a straightforward example, but it is just one of the tasks Bixby can do for you. You can ask Bixby to do all kinds of things on your phone. Some examples include Telling you the time Setting an alarm Turning Wi-Fi on or off Telling you the weather forecast Setting a countdown timer Recording your voice Opening an app Playing a playlist Adding an appointment to your schedule Finding a local restaurant, store, or public location Navigating to an address or location All you need to do is ask, and Bixby does a good job finding what you want. Here is the best way to learn what Bixby can do: Ask Bixby, “What services do you offer?” The screen shown here appears. Each app comes with a suggestion under the app name. For example, the app suggests what you can do, such as “Send birthday flowers.” You can learn more when you tap the 1-800-Flowers.com link. A complete list of apps is shown here. This list is impressive. Most applications have a pretty good list of commands. The following figure shows a more modest list of options for the Calculator app, to give you a sense of what’s there. Go ahead and try some math problems to get the hang of it. Who knew math would be so easy? (And to think Mr. McCrea said that we wouldn’t always have a calculator when we needed it.) All this talking and calculating has made me a little hungry, but not too hungry that I can’t ask Bixby, “Hi, Bixby. Where is the closest McDonald’s using Google Maps?” Bixby comes back with some options, as shown. Then you can ask it for directions to the McDonald’s you choose. This request causes Bixby to hand you over to your preferred navigation application, bringing up a screen like the one shown. You could also use other apps, such as Yelp, if you prefer getting information other than just location. For example, if you want to find the best Italian restaurant in Seattle, just ask and you see the following screen. Now all you need to do is drive there safely and enjoy!

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Your Video Options on the Samsung Galaxy S10

Article / Updated 10-15-2019

The Play Music app allows you to play music files on your Samsung Galaxy S10. Similarly, you use the Video Player app to play video options. The Video Player is in your Application list and might even be on your home page. In most ways, playing videos is the same as playing audio with some exceptions: Many people prefer to buy music, but renting is more typical for videos. Video files are usually, but not always, larger. Otherwise, as with music files, you can acquire videos for your phone from an online video store — and you need to have an account and pay for the use. In addition, you can download video files to your phone, and the Video Player will play them like a DVD player. There is a great selection of videos on the Google Play Store and Amazon Prime Video. Each of these has great video selections that you can rent or buy. The following figure shows the Home screens for the Google Play Store and Amazon Prime Video. Using the three screens If you have a subscription to Amazon Video, I hereby grant you permission to watch any and all of the Amazon Video options on your Galaxy S10 (once you sign in and comply with all the terms and conditions set forth by Amazon). Once you install the Amazon Prime Video app from the Play Store, sign in with the email and password associated with your account, and all the content is there for you to stream. It is that simple. If you don’t believe me, give it a try. If you take a look at the Amazon Prime Video home page on the Internet, seen in the following figure, it shows your options for access to the content to which you subscribe. The original term for this was called serving the three screens. Three screens referred to in the strategy included your television at home, your PC or laptop, and your smartphone. The idea is that you get one subscription and have access to the same content and, importantly, can pick up where you left off. So, if you’re watching a video on your television, you can pick up where you left off on your smartphone. Amazon Prime Video is taking this one step further to ensure as many of its subscribers as possible have access. If you have a Smart TV that has an Internet connection, the chances are that Amazon Prime Video will run on the TV. If you have an old and/or a dumb TV, you can get Amazon through streaming media players, game consoles, set-top boxes, or Blu-ray players. Amazon is not the only organization to do this. Many cable companies offer this kind of solution, as do many of the video subscription services. The mainstream video services compete with having a broad range within their libraries that seek to appeal to as many customers as possible. Keep in mind that there are specialty video providers that offer curated videos for their subscribers. For example, TeacherTube is a site dedicated to K-12 education, as seen in the following figure. If we continue down this path further, there are a great number of options for online education. Many of these sites do not consider themselves to be video aggregators, but that’s exactly what happens when they take recorded lectures and provide them to students. The best-known online education service is the University of Phoenix. There are dozens more online universities. Education is just one curated video service. Others exist for videos of Bollywood movies, British sitcoms, Portuguese game shows, and many other art forms. How to view your own videos You can watch any video you’ve shot on your phone. From the Google Play application, scroll over to the Personal Video section. Your phone can show the following video formats: MPEG-4, WMV, AVI/DivX, MKV, and FLV. To play your video, simply tap the name of the file. The app begins showing the video in landscape orientation. The controls that pop up when you tap the screen are similar to the controls of a DVD player. The reality of virtual reality Video games can be immersive, and a good movie can really suck you into its reality. The idea of virtual reality is to take this one step further. The basic idea behind virtual reality is to create a simulated world by having you wear a pair of goggles and presenting images that change the screen based upon movements of your head and body. We can explore the concept by taking it in steps. At the most basic level, you can use your phone with a pair of virtual reality goggles. Samsung is offering virtual reality goggles that are designed to work with your Galaxy S10. What you do is insert your Galaxy S10 into the goggles. Then you use the little remote next to the goggles to navigate to the application. The remote is very convenient because, without it, the only way to communicate with the screen is by turning your head to commands and then holding it there for a few seconds. That little device allows you to navigate the screen while the phone is inserted in the goggles. What happens is that your field of view is entirely taken up by the screen of your Galaxy S10. Imagine the most basic scenario, where the camera on the back of your phone shows you what is in front of you. This kind of experience is more or less comparable to using a pair of eyeglasses. When you walk forward, things come closer. When you look down, you see the floor. When you turn your head to the right or the left, you see things that were not in your range of vision. So far, this is not very interesting. So, let’s take it up a level. Now let’s let your phone and all its processing capacity and intelligence tell you what you’re looking at. You turn your head, and you see a picture. Presto chango, you see a little pop-up next to the picture that tells you that this is a print of Edward Hopper’s The Nighthawks. You look out the window, and a pop-up appears with current weather conditions and a forecast for today. Now you take your virtual reality goggles to the grocery store. As you get your cart, a familiar face comes up and starts talking. For the life of you, you cannot remember who this person is or how you know him. In just a moment, the face recognition system recognizes this person, and a pop-up identifies that this person is your old neighbor Bif Wellington. After chatting, you walk the store aisles looking for deals. You get a pop-up letting you know when this grocery is giving you a good deal on Honeycrisp apples, or if you can get them cheaper at the other store. This capability is called augmented reality. Let’s take it up another notch. Imagine a world where, instead of seeing a slightly modified version of your reality, you are transported to a beach. You can look around and see palm trees and jungles behind you. Why stay earthbound? You are virtually transported to the space around Mars. As you look around, it is as if you are there on Mars. The following figure looks like two images of the same planet. When your phone is inserted in the goggles, you get a 3-D image of the planet. You can also look around and navigate throughout the solar system. Trust me, this is a lot more convenient than space travel. Why stay in the mainstream opinion of what is reality? Now we can all have an “Alice through the Looking Glass” experience. You can grow and shrink and see all kinds of unusual visions which are limited by your imagination. There are some very, very cool demonstrations that leverage the capabilities of your phone. The Samsung offering comes at a great price compared to some of the other options out there. For that matter, you may have received the Samsung virtual reality goggles for free for preordering your phone. There are additional VR applications and content in the Play Store. This is a rapidly changing area of the Play Store where new content is constantly being added. Be sure to check the Play Store regularly. This should make your friends who own iPhone technology suitably jealous. What needs to happen is further application development to really take us to where this technology can go. Some of us unfortunately have the unpleasant experience of what is called virtual-reality sickness. This is similar, but not identical, to seasickness and car sickness. The most common symptoms are nausea and headaches. If this happens to you, some of the medicines that help seasickness may help you avoid this unpleasant sensation. Some say it also helps to be seated when using virtual reality. Plus, symptoms tend to diminish over time as your brain gets used to this experience. If the symptoms are too severe, virtual reality may just not be for you.

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The Maps App on Your Samsung Galaxy S10

Article / Updated 10-15-2019

Having a map on your phone is a very handy tool. At the most basic level, you can ask your phone to show you a map for where you plan to go. This is convenient, but only a small part of what you can do. With the right Android applications, your Galaxy S10 phone can do the following: Automatically find your location on a map. Give directions to where you want to go. As you drive, using historical driving times. As you drive, using real-time road conditions. While you walk. As you take public transportation. Give turn-by-turn directions as you travel. With two-dimensional representations of the road and intersections. With three-dimensional representations of the roads, buildings, and intersections. Tell others where you are. Use the screen on your phone as a viewfinder to identify landmarks as you pan the area (augmented reality). There are also some mapping applications for the Galaxy S10 for commercial users, such as MyBusVue from Zonar Systems or Live Truck Tracking from Real Green Systems, but I don’t cover them in this book. GPS 101: first things first You can’t talk smartphone mapping without GPS in the background, which creates a few inherent challenges of which you need to be aware. First off (and obviously), there is a GPS receiver in your phone. That means the following: Gimme a sec. Like all GPS receivers, your location-detection system takes a little time to determine your location when you first turn on your phone. Outdoors is better. Many common places where you use your phone — primarily, within buildings — have poor GPS coverage. Nothing is perfect. Even with good GPS coverage, location and mapping aren’t perfected yet. Augmented reality, the option that identifies local landmarks on the screen, is even less perfect. You must be putting me on. Your GPS receiver must be turned on for it to work. Sure, turning it off saves battery life, but doing so precludes mapping applications from working. Keep it on the down-low. Sharing sensitive location information is of grave concern to privacy advocates. The fear is that a stalker or other villain can access your location information in your phone to track your movements. In practice, there are easier ways to accomplish this goal, but controlling who knows your location is still something you should consider, particularly when you have applications that share your location information. Good cellular coverage has nothing to do with GPS coverage. The GPS receiver in your phone is looking for satellites; cellular coverage is based upon antennas mounted on towers or tall buildings. Mapping apps are useful, but they also use more battery life and data than many other applications. Be aware of the impact on your data usage and battery life. Leaving mapping applications active is convenient, but it can also be a drain on your battery and your wallet if you don’t pay attention to your usage and have the wrong service plan. Practically speaking: using Maps The kind of mapping application that’s easiest to understand is one that presents a local map when you open the application. Depending on the model of your phone, you may have a mapping applications preloaded, such as Google Maps, TeleNav, or VZ Navigator. You can find them on your Home screen and in your Application list. It’s not a large leap for a smartphone to offer directions from your GPS-derived location to somewhere you want to go in the local area. These are standard capabilities found in each of these applications. This article describes Google Maps and Google Maps Navigation; these are both free and may come preinstalled on your phone. If not, you can download them from the Google Play Store. Other mapping applications that may come with your phone, such as Bing Maps or Waze, have similar capabilities, but the details will be a bit different. Or you may want to use other mapping applications. That’s all fine. In addition to the general-purpose mapping applications that come on your phone, hundreds of available mapping applications can help you find a favorite store, navigate waterways, or find your car in a crowded parking lot. For example, Navigon and Waze offer solutions that base their navigation on real-time traffic conditions and give you turn-by-turn directions using three-dimensional images of the neighborhoods in which you are driving. As nice as mapping devices are, they’re too slow to tell you to stop looking at them and avoid an oncoming car. If you can’t control yourself in the car and need to watch the arrow on the map screen move, do yourself a favor and let someone else drive. If no one else is available to drive, be safe and don’t use the navigation service on your phone in the car. The most basic way to use a map is to bring up the Google Maps application. The icon for launching this app is shown here. The first screen that you see when you tap the Google Maps icon is a street map with your location. The following figure shows an example of a map when the phone user is in the Seattle area. Your location is the blue dot at the center of the map — unless you’re moving, at which point it becomes a blue arrow. The resolution of the map in the figure starts at about one square mile. You can see other parts of the map by placing a finger on the map and dragging away from the part of the map that you want to see. That brings new sections of the map onto the screen. Turn the phone to change how the map is displayed. Depending on what you’re looking for, a different orientation might be easier. Changing map scale A resolution of one square mile will work, under some circumstances, to help you get oriented in an unfamiliar place. But sometimes it helps to zoom out to get a broader perspective or zoom in to find familiar landmarks, like a body of water or a major highway. To get more real estate onto the screen, use a pinch motion. This shrinks the size of the map and brings in more of the map around where you’re pinching. If you need more real estate on the screen, you can keep pinching until you get more and more map. After you have your bearings, you can return to the original resolution by double-tapping the screen. On the other hand, a scale of one square mile may not be enough. To see more landmarks, use the stretch motion to zoom in. The stretch motion expands the boundaries of the place where you start the screen. Continue stretching and stretching until you get the detail that you want. The following figure shows a street map both zoomed in and zoomed out. The map on the left is zoomed in in Satellite view. The map on the right is zoomed out in Terrain view. The app gives you the choice of Satellite view or Terrain view by tapping the menu button, the three parallel lines, on the top-left corner of the map. This brings up a pop-up menu similar to the one shown. Bring up the Satellite view by tapping Satellite. You get the Terrain view by tapping Terrain. You can also bring up other views that are useful to you, including transit routes and bicycling paths. If you’re zooming in and can’t find where you are on the map, tap the dot-surrounded-by-a-circle icon. It moves the map so that you’re in the center. Finding nearby services Most searches for services fall into a relatively few categories. Your Maps application is set up to find what you’re most likely to seek. By tapping the Local Services icon at the bottom of the page, you’re offered a quick way to find the services near you, such as restaurants, coffee shops, bars, hotels, attractions, ATMs, and gas stations, as shown here. Not only that, it is aware of the time of day. There are different suggestions during breakfast time than in the evening. Just scroll down and tap one of the topical icons, and your phone performs a search of businesses in your immediate area. The results come back as a regular Google search with names, addresses, and distances from your location. An example is shown here. In addition to the location and reviews, the search results include icons and other relevant information: Directions: Tap the car icon to get turn-by-turn directions from your location to this business. Call: Tap this to call the business. Save: Tap the star to set this place as one of your favorites. Website: Tap this to be taken to the website for this business. Share Place: Tap the Share Place icon, and you’re presented with lots of ways to tell your friends, family, co-workers, and the world about this wonderful place. More options, which include Street View: See the location in Google Street View. Street View shows a photo of the street address for the location you entered. Hours: If this establishment has shared its hours of operation, you can find them here. Menu: If this establishment has shared its menu, you can find it here. Reviews: This includes all kinds of information about what people have experienced this location. More: Run another Google search on this business to get additional information, such as reviews from other parts of the web. But let’s say you show up, and the line is out the door. It happens. All you need to do is tap the street address, and the local map will appear as shown. This map tells you all the locations around you so you can find another option. How to get and use directions You probably want to get directions from your map application. I know I do. You can get directions in a number of ways, including: Tap the Search text box and enter the name or address of your location — for example, Seattle Space Needle or 742 Evergreen Terrace, Springfield, IL. Tap the Explore icon, tap the Attractions icon, and select your location. Any of these methods lead you to the map showing your location. It might seem intuitive to expect that when you search for a specific attraction (such as the Seattle Space Needle), you get only the Seattle Space Needle. Such a result, however, is sometimes too simple. A given search may have multiple results, such as for chain stores. Google Map gives you several choices, and you may need to choose your favorite. Typically, the app will give you the closest option. To get directions, tap the Directions icon. This brings up the pop-up screen shown. This gives you the options of Driving: Turn-by-turn directions as you drive from where you are to the destination. Public Transportation: This option tells you how to get to your destination by taking public transportation using published schedules. Taxi or Ride Service: This option gives the time if you were to hop a taxi, Uber, or Lyft. Cycling: This option is for the cyclists among us; it includes bike trails in addition to city streets. Walking Navigation: Turn-by-turn directions as you walk to your destination. For each of these options, you can use the options at the bottom of the screen to Get Directions: Sequential directions, as shown in the following figure, but without telling you when to turn. Navigate: Rather than show you a map, this option puts you in a navigation app that monitors where you are as you travel and tells you what to do next.

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The Google Play Store Games Category for Your Samsung Galaxy S10

Article / Updated 10-15-2019

Games are the most popular kind of download for smartphones of all kinds. The differences between games and Android apps are as follows: If a person likes a game, he or she tends to play it for a while, maybe for a few weeks or even months, and then stops using it. A person who likes an app tends to keep on using it. Games tend to use more of the graphical capabilities of your phone. People who use their phones for games tend to like to try a wide range of games. The fact of the matter is that your Samsung Galaxy S10, with its large Super AMOLED screen and beefy graphics processing unit, makes Android-based games more fun. And because you already have one, maybe you should take a break and concentrate on having fun! The top level the Google Play Store splits offerings into a few categories: Home, Games, Movies & TV, and a few other categories off to the right. We want games. Games that test our skills; games that are fun; games that are cute; games that immerse us in an alternate universe! To get there, tap on the Games button! This brings up the Games page as shown. This section of the store has nothing but games. This section includes everything from simple puzzles to simulated violence. All games involve various combinations of intellect, skill (either cognitive or motor), and role-playing. Let’s do it. The Games Home screen If you scroll around this screen, you see many suggested games. This is shown in panorama in the following figure. If you aren’t sure what games you might like to try, don’t worry: There are lots of options. As you can see, the Games Home screen makes lots of suggestions. Each row takes a different perspective on helping you find a new game. A few of these are board games, strategy games, and action games. They also include games that allow you to play offline without Wi-Fi. Another approach is to choose the Categories options. This will bring up the game categories shown here. The Games Categories tab In the Play Store, games are divided into the following genres: Action: Games that involve shooting projectiles that can range from marshmallows to bullets to antiballistic missiles. They also involve fighting games with every level of gore possible. Adventure: Games that take you to virtual worlds where you search for treasure and/or fight evil. Zombies and vampires are traditional evildoers. Arcade: Game room and bar favorites. Board: Versions of familiar (and some not-so-familiar) board games. Card: All the standard card games are here. Casino: Simulations of gambling games; no real money changes hands. Casual: Games that you can easily pick up and put aside (unless you have and addictive personality). Educational: Enjoyable games that also offer users enhanced skills or information. Music: Includes a wide range of games that involve music in one way or another. These games may include trivia, educational games involving learning music, or sing-a-long songs for kids. Puzzle: Includes games like Sudoku, word search, and Trivial Pursuit. Racing: Cars, go-karts, snowboards, jet skis, biplanes, jets, or spacecraft competing with one another. Role Playing: In a virtual world, become a different version of who you are in real life, be it for better or worse. Simulation: Rather than live in the virtual world of some game designer, create and manage your own virtual world. Sports: Electronic interpretations of real-world activities that incorporate some of the skill or strategy elements of the original game; vary based upon the level of detail. Strategy: Emphasize decision-making skills, like chess; a variety of games with varying levels of complexity and agreement with reality. Trivia: A variety of games that reward you if you know things like the name of the family dog from the TV show My Three Sons. Its name was Tramp, but you knew that already. Word: Games that are universally popular, such as Scrabble. Many games appear in more than one category. Each game has a Description page. It’s similar to the Description page for apps, but it emphasizes different attributes. The following figure is an example Description page. When you’re in a category that looks promising, look for these road signs to help you check out and narrow your choices among similar titles: Ratings/Comments: Gamers love to exalt good games and bash bad ones. The comments for the game shown in the preceding figure are complimentary, and the overall ranking next to the game name at the top suggests that many others are favorable. Description: This tells you the basic idea behind the game. What’s New: This section tells what capabilities have been added since the previous release. This is relevant if you have an earlier version of this game. Reviews: Here is where existing users get to vent their spleen if they do not like the game or brag about how smart they are for buying it ahead of you. The comments are anonymous, include the date the comment was left, and tell you the kind of device the commenter used. There can be applications that lag on some older devices. However, you have the Galaxy S10, which has the best of everything (for now). More Games by Developer: If you have a positive experience with a given game, you may want to check that developer’s other games. The More By section makes it easier for you to find these other titles. Users Also Viewed/Users Also Installed: This shows you the other apps that other people who downloaded this app have viewed or downloaded. These are some apps that you may want to check out. Price: As a tie-breaker among similar titles, a slightly higher price is a final indication of a superior game. And because you’re only talking a few pennies, price isn’t usually a big deal.

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How Mobile Payment and Samsung Pay Work

Article / Updated 10-14-2019

It helps to explain how mobile payments work to see how Samsung Pay helps you. The idea is that you walk up to the checkout stand at a retailer. You swipe your fingerprint on the reader, place your phone near the card reader, and instantly your transaction is done. The receipt prints, and you take your purchase and go on your merry way. The charge shows up on your credit card. Besides a fingerprint, you can enter a four-digit PIN or a quick retinal scan by glancing at your phone. You choose the security option that is most convenient for you, and Samsung makes sure that everything flows securely. All the authorizations were set up when you set up the credit card with Samsung Pay. Really. That’s all there is. It sounds so simple. The interesting thing is that this capability has been around in one form or another for over 20 years. Back in 1997, Mobil gas stations implemented contactless payment with their Speedpass. Users on the system would tap their Speedpass fobs that they would keep on the key ring on the reader installed on the gas pump. Their credit card would be charged for the gas they pumped. Initially, the tap was all that it took to pay for the gas. Later, users needed to add their ZIP code to enhance security. In spite of Mobil’s best efforts, the system had only moderate success. There are a range of reasons, but a major concern was that people were already hesitant to even carry yet another thing. It is the inclusion of some new technology within smartphones that makes it so much more convenient. Visa and MasterCard also tried contactless systems with limited success. One of their major challenges is that not enough credit card readers support the contactless payment system. After years of trying, fewer than 10 percent of all credit card readers as recently as 2015 have this capability. Those readers that do support contactless payment have the logo shown here. The contactless payment approach got a significant boost when Apple introduced the Apple Pay system on the iPhone in 2014. Like some other technologies that have struggled to find widespread acceptance, the implementation by Apple produced enough momentum to overcome resistance to its widespread use. Examples include the Apple Macintosh with its use of a mouse, the Apple iPod revolutionizing the acceptance of MP3 players, and the Apple iPad creating a revolutionizing a trend for tablets. All of these technologies were pioneered by other companies before Apple made them popular. The Apple Pay system has seen significant success in an area where others have struggled. The retailers with the contactless credit card technology have seen a huge increase in its use from iPhone customers. With Samsung Pay, however, Samsung has leapfrogged Apple. Samsung Pay works similarly to Apple Pay with contactless payment devices. It also works with the vast majority of standard credit card readers. Take that, Apple! While 10 percent of credit card readers in retailers today support contactless payment, another 85 percent of credit card readers at retailers have readers that can read the magnetic stripe on the back of your credit card. Samsung Pay along with your Samsung Galaxy S10 have the electronics built in to work with the contactless system but also the electronics to convince the magnetic stripe readers that you have swiped your card! The technology within your phone that works with the standard credit card readers is called Magnetic Secure Transmission, or MST. When you place your phone near the magnetic stripe reader, it sends a very short-range signal to the magnetic stripe reader on your card that simulates the signals it gets when you physically swipe a magnetic stripe reader. Your imagination could go wild and come up with ways that fiendish people could potentially steal this technology. One can never say never, but there are extensive procedures that are put in place to set up this capability to prevent it in most instances. The rest of this chapter walks you through those processes. Probably the biggest drawback in using this technology these days is that too few retail clerks know that it will work. They freak out the first time they see it as they are probably familiar with contactless payment methods, know that they do not have it, and do not know about this slick solution. They will want to ask you more about it, which will end up taking more time than if you were paying by writing a check and having to provide two forms of identification!

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