Tokyo 2020 Olympics For Dummies book cover

Tokyo 2020 Olympics For Dummies

By: Celeste Kiyoko Hall Published: 02-11-2020

Make the most of your 2020 Olympic adventure!

If you dream of traveling to the Olympic games but feel overwhelmed by the thought of a trip to Japan, then Tokyo 2020 Olympics For Dummies is for you. Hundreds of thousands of international travelers will arrive in Tokyo for the next Olympics to share in the worldwide camaraderie and watch world-class athletes in 33 sports. This book is your complete authority on how to join in!

Learn about travel options, safety, customs, and facts about the Olympic Games. Tokyo is an amazing destination, and you’ll be prepared for the voyage of a lifetime with knowledge of Japanese culture and trip planning tips.

  • Plan your trip to the 2020 Olympic Games in Tokyo, Japan
  • Be prepared with tips on Japanese culture, customs, language, and more
  • Learn about how the Olympic Games are structured to make the best of your time
  • Stay stress free and have fun with international travel advice and Olympic facts!

As you prepare for your once-in-a-lifetime excursion, keep this guide within easy reach!

Articles From Tokyo 2020 Olympics For Dummies

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Top 10 Tokyo Olympic Events to Watch

Article / Updated 05-14-2021

The 2020 Summer Olympics were delayed due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The 2020 Summer Olympics currently is scheduled for Summer 2021. It’s an undeniable truth: Some Olympic sports are just more popular or interesting to watch than others. That’s not to say that they’re better or more worthy than others. Certain sports have managed to capture the attention of viewers for multiple reasons, whether it’s because the rules are simple and the competitions are relatable, or because the athletes do things we never even imagined possible. Find out what will be some of the top events to watch at the Tokyo 2020 Olympics. Opening and closing ceremonies The Olympic opening and closing ceremonies are some of the largest celebrations held in the whole world. Part of what makes the opening and closing ceremonies so spectacular is not just the lights and performances, but also the meaning behind the demonstrations. The Games Vision consists of three core concepts: “striving for your personal best,” “accepting one another,” and “passing on a legacy for the future.” The Tokyo 2020 Olympic Ceremonies specifically will focus on eight different concepts: Peace Coexistence Reconstruction Future Japan and Tokyo Athletes Involvement Excitement It will be excited to see exactly how Japan incorporates these points into the ceremonies. If nothing else, it will be a spectacular display, for sure! Track and field Track and field is one of those Olympic sports that is loved for both its simplicity and its competitiveness. For most track events, the object is simple: to reach the finish line before the other racers. It’s something everyone can relate to. Racing is something that all of us have likely done at least once in our lives, whether it was in school or just a friendly competition among friends. Yet, despite its simplicity, it keeps everyone on the edge of their seats. Why? Because races are often won by less than a sliver. In the 2016 Summer Olympics, Usain Bolt beat Justin Gatlin for the gold medal in the 100-meter race by eight-hundredths of a second. In turn, Gatling only beat Andre De Grasse by two-hundredths of a second. Other track events, combine both speed and endurance, challenging the athletes’ ability to pace themselves while still trying to stay ahead of the other racers, making it as much of a mental game as it is a physical one. The field events also display great athleticism and give spectators the opportunity to observe great accomplishments that you don’t see every day. When was the last time you watched somebody throw a javelin 98 meters (107 yards)? Gymnastics Unlike other Olympic sports like track and field or swimming, where viewers can truly relate to the sport, gymnastics is one of those sports that make the athletes seem more like magicians. Sure, most of us can kick a soccer ball from one field to the other — some not very well, but it can be done. Ask a random person to do a triple flip off a balance beam? Yeah, not likely to happen. At the end of the day, it’s just really cool to see gymnasts perform stunts that are seemingly impossible. This Olympic sport has also increased in difficulty, making it even more of a spectacle. In 2006, the introduction of the Code of Points, a new rulebook defining the scoring system for gymnastics, encouraged athletes to make routines more and more difficult instead of playing it safe in order to focus on technique execution. One of the other unique aspects of gymnastics is that it’s one of the few Olympic sports that requires a great deal of creativity along with athleticism. Many of the routines are as much of a dance performance as they are skilled execution of techniques. On top of that, every single movement has to be executed absolutely perfectly. Simone Biles, the most decorated gymnast in history, will also likely be returning to the stage for the Tokyo Olympics and is almost guaranteed to put on a good show. Swimming The Tokyo Olympics will be the first Summer Olympics since 2000 where Michael Phelps, the most decorated Olympian of all time, won’t be competing. However, that hasn’t made the sport of swimming any less interesting. It’s a sport of great diversity, with a total of four different types of techniques, or strokes, that are completed across all sorts of varying distances. Like many sports, swimming is constantly evolving, but athletes are also constantly innovating. This innovation in techniques has allowed seven new world records to be set in swimming between the 2012 and 2016 Olympics. What world records do you think will be set in this Summer Olympics? Basketball Part of what makes Olympic basketball so interesting to watch is the fact that you typically never have to wait too long for a point to be scored. This means that there is always something exciting going on. As if the continuous scoring weren’t enough excitement, the performance of the players adds even more. There are dunks, alley-oops, and all sorts of other exciting plays to capture your attention. Plus, some of the most intense games in basketball come down to the very last few seconds of the game to determine who the winner will be. Part of what else makes Olympic basketball, in particular, so exciting is that players must play for their home countries. This means that some international players who traditionally play in the NBA in the United States may be returning home to play for their respective countries and facing off against the United States. Soccer Soccer is one of the most popular sports around the world, and it has seen countless victorious teams over the years. Brazil took home the gold in 2016, and other countries such as Mexico and Argentina have taken home the gold in recent Summer Olympic Games. Who do you think will take home the gold? Unlike other sports such as basketball, soccer is a very low-scoring games, with some games going into overtime with a score of 0-0. However, that’s always what contributes to some of the excitement. When an athlete kicks at the goal, will it go in? Will they score that coveted point that could ultimately make the difference in who wins the game? Even between goals, athletes put on quite a show. From their fancy footwork to juking defenders to outsmarting the goalie, there is always something interesting going on. Volleyball Many sports require good teamwork and communication, but volleyball seems to require more than most. Teammates have to work together perfectly in order to not only retrieve a ball hit to their side, but also set up another player to spike the ball back to the opponent’s side of the court. If you look really closely, you may even see players holding up fingers behind their backs when communicating to other team members. Part of what makes the sport so exciting to watch is not only the speed at which players can spike the ball over the net, but also the heights they can reach. Some players are more than 6 feet tall and can reach heights of over 11 feet when attempting to spike or block the ball. Judo Given that judo originated in Japan, this sport holds a special place in the hearts of many Japanese, making it one of the more popular sports for the 2020 Summer Olympics. Like many martial art sports, it’s full of bursts of actions. For much of the match, athletes will do feints and teases, sort of feeling their opponents out, waiting for them to make mistakes that will give them an opening. When an athlete does decide to make her move, it’s a sudden rush as both try to defend and gain the upper hand, ultimately allowing her to pin her opponent. Rugby Although American football is not an Olympic sport, Americans may find rugby just as entertaining. It has significant differences, but it still carries much of the same excitement. Even though only the ball carrier can be tackled in rugby, there is still quite a bit of tackling going on. A study published in 2012 revealed that a total of 31,655 tackles were recorded across 48 professional rugby league matches. That’s an average of 659 tackles per game! What makes it even more amazing is that rugby can be played with just a mouthguard. Unlike in American football where players wear hard, heavy padding, in rugby only light padding on the head and shoulders is allowed. Sport Climbing Sport climbing is one of the new sports making its debut in the Tokyo 2020 Olympics, and it’s worth watching for the same reason as gymnastics. Sure, in sport climbing you don’t have athletes performing beautiful routines to fancy music, but you’ll see them do some absolutely incredible things. Not convinced? Go to YouTube and search for “speed climbing.” With the way these athletes can scale an almost 50-foot wall in six to seven seconds, it wouldn’t be surprising to discover one of them were secretly Spider-Man.

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Tokyo 2020 Olympics For Dummies Cheat Sheet

Cheat Sheet / Updated 03-14-2021

Thinking about heading to Japan for the Tokyo 2020 Olympics? Planning a trip like this has a lot of moving pieces to it. You have to make sure you have all your paperwork in order, book flights and hotels, buy event tickets, figure out how to get to the different venues (ideally without getting lost), pack, get your phone to work, and hopefully not offend anybody along the way. Check out these tips and helpful hints to make your life a bit easier.

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Managing Your Money When You Travel in Japan

Article / Updated 03-06-2020

You may be surprised to learn that cash is still king in Japan. At home, you may be used to carrying very little cash with you, if any at all. However, in Japan, you’ll likely use cash pretty much everywhere. As such, it’s definitely worth familiarizing yourself with the Japanese yen (JPY), the official currency of Japan. Knowing how much your money is worth The exchange rate between the U.S. dollar (USD) and JPY changes daily (as it does between all currencies). Back in June 2015, travelers could get ¥125 for $1. In August 2016, it dropped as low as ¥100 for $1. More recently, in November 2019, it hovered around ¥109 for $1. When standing in a souvenir shop trying to figure out how much an item will cost in your home currency, it can get annoying having to look up the exchange rate and then do some division to figure out how much a souvenir costs. If you have a smartphone, download a currency conversion app. Just go to your phone’s app store, and search for “currency converter.” You’ll find several good options that’ll make traveling in Japan (or anywhere) easier. If you’re converting JPY to USD, you can do some quick math for converting. Many travelers find it easy to just assume that ¥100 is about $1. Then you can look at a price tag in yen and drop the last two zeros (or move the decimal point two places to the left) and roughly get the USD equivalent. You may get a little more than ¥100 per dollar, but this gives you a ballpark estimate on the fly. Making sense of the Japanese yen If you’re anything like most Americans, you may drop change in donation jars at registers, throw coins in a cup holder in your car, or lose them in the couch. Some people hold onto coins and put them in a piggy bank, but there are definitely a significant number of people who find change more annoying than useful. If you’re one of the many people who hate using change, you may have to rethink the way you look at coins when you’re in Japan. Americans are used to the $1 bill and $5 bill, while Europeans are used to the €5 bill, and Australians are used to the $5 bill. The equivalent in Japanese yen are coins. That’s right, the ¥100 and ¥500 are coins. This means that if you start casually throwing coins to the side as you’re used to doing, you may be throwing away a significant chunk of change! It’s a good idea to somewhat familiarize yourself with the various coins. You may have a hard time distinguishing between the ¥5 and ¥50 coins, especially when digging through a coin purse looking for a specific one. The two coins are supposed to be different colors, but depending on how old and worn the coins are, they can sometimes start to look the same. Thankfully, all but the ¥5 yen coin has its value written in roman characters on at least one of the sides. If you look at a coin and don’t see a number on either side, that’s the ¥5 coin! The banknotes or “bills” are similar to what you’ll find in other countries. The ¥1,000 bill is roughly equivalent to the $10 bill in the United States, the ¥5,000 bill is the same as a $50 bill, and the ¥10,000 yen bill is equivalent to a $100 bill. Interestingly enough, Japan does technically have a ¥2,000 bill, but it’s rare. In terms of value, it’s about the same as a $20 bill, but in terms of rarity, it’s more like a $2 bill. In the United States, many people have never seen a $2 bill, or they’ve only seen it once or twice. The same goes for the ¥2,000 yen bill in Japan. Some people have seen it, but only rarely. If you choose to exchange money before your trip, you may end up receiving several ¥2,000 bills from your bank. Despite their rarity, they’re legal currency and they can be used almost everywhere. On occasion, you may find a vending machine or ticketing machine that has not been programmed to accept them, but even this is becoming less common. Getting cash in Japan In general, banks will likely provide some of the best exchange rates, and currency exchange shops found in airports and other popular tourist destinations will likely provide the worst. You’ll need to decide if you want to exchange money before you leave home, after you arrive in Japan, or both. Before your trip It’s a good idea to stop by your local bank before your trip to exchange at least some money. Having Japanese yen in hand (okay, maybe not in your hand, but in one of your bags or something) will likely take some stress off when you first land. You won’t have to run around the airport trying to find a place where you can exchange money without getting a terrible exchange rate. You don’t need to exchange enough money for your entire trip, but get enough cash to at least get you through the first day or two. This will allow you to get to your hotel and get settled before worrying about trying to find a place to get cash. Your home bank will probably have to order Japanese yen — very few banks have it on hand. It will typically take about 24 to 48 hours to arrive, so if you want to exchange cash before your trip, you’ll definitely want to do this at least a couple of days before you depart. While you’re at the bank, speak with them about possible fees that you could occur while traveling and see if they have any options that would allow you to avoid fees. While in Japan After you arrive in Japan, the best place to withdraw cash will be from ATMs, because that’s where you get the best exchange rate. However, not every ATM will accept cards that have been issued overseas. The best places for travelers to withdraw money will be at the ATMs found in post offices and 7-Eleven stores. In larger areas such as Tokyo, Kyoto, and similar cities, a post office or 7-Eleven always seems to be within a few minutes’ walk. Even in more rural areas, a post office or 7-Eleven likely won’t be super difficult to find. The availability of ATMs within post offices vary depending on the office, but at the very minimum they’ll be available during the day, typically 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. However, ATMs at larger post offices may be available as long as 7 a.m. to 11 p.m. Also note that the ATMs in post offices are unavailable on Sundays and holidays. 7-Eleven ATMs are typically available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year (with some exceptions). Visa cards are accepted 24 hours a day, but MasterCard is accepted only from 12:10 a.m. to 11:50 p.m. Other accepted credit cards, such as American Express and Discover, have similar limitations. ATMs that accept international cards can also be found at other select convenience stores such as Family Mart and Lawsons and can also be found in airports and major department stores. If you have the option, go to 7-Eleven ATMs when possible because they don’t charge an ATM fee. Post office ATMs and other ATMs that accept international cards may charge up to ¥216 ($1.98) per withdrawal. On top of the ATM fee, many banks charge an additional fee for withdrawing money abroad. Sometimes it’s a flat rate, sometimes it’s a percentage of the amount withdrawn, and sometimes it’s both. For example, a bank may charge a $5 international ATM fee plus a foreign transaction fee equal to 3 percent of the transaction amount; those fees will show up on your bank statement every time you withdraw money in Japan. Before your trip, talk to your home bank regarding what fees you may incur while in Japan. Many banks offer premium accounts or travel cards that don’t incur international fees (but have other stipulations). It’s worth talking to your bank to determine the best option for you.

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What You Need to Know to Get through Immigration and Customs in Japan

Article / Updated 03-06-2020

When you arrive at the airport in Japan, you’ll need to go through Immigration and Customs, basically telling the Japanese government who you are, why you’re there, and what you’ve brought with you. It’s nothing personal — the Japanese government just wants to make sure you’re not a security risk. Filling out the paperwork While on the plane to Japan, you’ll likely be given two forms by a flight attendant: the Disembarkation Card, which is needed when going through Immigration, and the Customs Declaration form, which is for going through Customs. Both cards have Japanese and English instructions and can be filled out in either Japanese or English. If for some reason you aren’t given these forms on the plane, you can pick them up in the airport after you land. Most of the flight attendants are pretty good at explaining who needs to fill out each form. In case they don’t, know that one Disembarkation Card is required per person, and one Customs Form is required per family. This means that every person should fill out a Disembarkation Card, but only one person should fill out a Customs Declaration form for the whole family. The Disembarkation Card On the Disembarkation Card, you’re required to provide the following information: Your family name (last name) Your given name (first name) Your date of birth Your home city and country The purpose of your visit (tourism, business, visiting relatives, or other) Your last flight number (the flight number for the flight you took to Japan, not the flight number of any previous connecting flights) How long you plan to stay in Japan Where you’ll stay in Japan (your hotel address) Any history of receiving a deportation order or refusal of entry into Japan Any history of being convicted of a crime (not just in Japan) Whether you possess controlled substances, guns, bladed weapons, or gunpowder The Customs Declaration form The Customs Declaration form will require you to fill out similar personal and travel information as the Disembarkation Card. It also asks several questions regarding what you’re bringing with you to Japan, including the following: Whether you’re bringing any prohibited articles and/or restricted articles into Japan: Prohibited articles are items that cannot be brought into Japan at all. Restricted articles are items that can be brought into Japan but have restrictions. The prohibited and restricted articles lists may be changed or updated by the Customs and Tariff Bureau at any time. So, check the Japan Customs website before you depart for your trip to ensure that you aren’t bringing any prohibited or restricted items with you. Whether you’re bringing gold bullion or products of gold into Japan. Whether you’re bringing any goods that exceed duty-free allowance in Japan: In general, personal effects and items for personal use are free of duties and/or taxes. This includes clothes, toiletries, and portable professional equipment. Alcoholic beverages and tobacco products can be brought into Japan duty-free up to a specific amount. Lastly, the total overseas market value of your items must be under ¥200,000 ($1,834.86). Whether you’re bringing commercial goods or samples into Japan: Basically, anything that you plan to sell or is not for personal use will be subject to duties and/or taxes. Whether you’re bringing any items that someone else has asked you to bring to Japan: If you’re bringing something with you because somebody else asked you to, you’ll need to answer yes to this question. However, it’s mostly just a check to make sure that you’re not unintentionally (or intentionally) smuggling something into the country because somebody asked you to. Whether you’re bringing the equivalent of ¥1,000,000 ($9,174.31 ) or more into the country (including cash, checks, promissory notes, precious metals, and so on): There is no limit to the amount of money that can be brought into Japan. However, if you bring the equivalent of ¥1,000,000 ($9,174.31 ) into Japan, it must be declared. Whether you have any unaccompanied articles (any items you bring into Japan outside of what will be with you at the airport): For example, if you chose to ship or forward your luggage ahead of you, any luggage you shipped would be considered an unaccompanied article. Checked luggage is not considered unaccompanied articles. You may not have your checked luggage with you on the plane when you’re filling out this paperwork, but you’ll pick up your luggage before going through Customs at the airport. Going through Quarantine and Immigration in Japan When you get off the plane, the first section you’ll come to in the airport is Quarantine. Unless a medical questionnaire form was distributed on the plane, you won’t have to do anything here. Most times, passengers are only required to go through Quarantine when they’re coming from areas dealing with certain outbreaks. For example, passengers coming to Japan from North America were required to go through Quarantine during the H1N1 outbreak back in 2009 and 2010. After Quarantine is the Immigration section. Here, you need to present your passport and Disembarkation Card. Also, all those who are granted permission for short-term stay (without a visa) will be photographed, fingerprinted, and asked for proof of onward travel or proof that they’ll be leaving the country. During the off-season, many travelers can get through Immigration in less than 20 minutes. However, during popular travel times, such as cherry blossom season, this process can take over an hour due to long lines. With the large influx of travelers for the Olympics, be prepared for the process to take longer than expected. For this reason, it’s a good idea to not book any transportation tickets or activities too close to your flight arrival time. Going through Customs in Japan After you go through Immigration, you’ll find baggage claim, where you can pick up any luggage you may have checked. Also near here, you’ll find the plant and animal quarantine area. You need to stop here if you’re bringing animals, meats, fruits, or other plants into Japan. After you have your bags, continue forward and you’ll arrive at Customs. Here, you find two different lines: Green Channel and Red Channel. The Green Channel is for those who do not have anything to declare. The Red Channel is for those who do have items to declare or aren’t sure. Regardless of which line you choose, you’ll be asked to present your passport and Customs Declaration form. Most times, Customs officers will conduct a high-level interview, asking questions such as “Where are you from?,” “How long are you staying?,” or “Are you bring X, Y, or Z item with you?” On occasion, travelers have been asked additional, more in-depth questions and even had their bags searched. This may become more common as Japan increases security to ensure the safety of visitors during the Olympics.

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4 Things You Need to Know About Planning Your Trip for the Tokyo 2020 Olympics

Article / Updated 03-06-2020

The opportunity to see the 2020 Tokyo Olympics is a definitely a great opportunity! But remember, you’ll be traveling to a foreign country. If you have never been to Japan, you’ll need to make sure you’ve prepared appropriately. Keep these four things in mind. Get the required vaccinations The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) recommends that travelers be up to date on all routine vaccines before traveling to Japan. Examples of routine vaccines would be the measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccine and the chicken pox vaccine. Additional vaccines may be recommended depending on what activities you plan to do and which areas of Japan you plan to visit. In all cases, consult with your doctor to ensure you receive any necessary vaccines before your trip. More information about recommended vaccines can be found on the CDC website. Bring your medications Japan has somewhat strict rules when it comes to bringing medications into the country. In general, you can bring up to a two months’ supply of over-the-counter medication and up to a one month’s supply of prescription medication. However, there are several exceptions to this rule. The first thing to note is that over-the-counter medications that have stimulants that make up more than 10 percent of the ingredients are forbidden. You’ll mostly see this with some allergy, sinus, and cold medications that are available in the United States. For example, Sudafed, a common decongestant, contains pseudoephedrine, which is considered a stimulant and is, therefore, forbidden. Stimulant drugs such as heroin, cocaine, opium, and marijuana are strictly forbidden, even if they were obtained legally. You read that correctly. You cannot bring marijuana with you to Japan even if it was prescribed to you by a doctor. Other stimulants such as methamphetamines and amphetamines are also prohibited even if you have a prescription. These tend to occur in attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and sleep disorder medications. Other types of prescription medications (such as narcotics), as well as medications where you need more than one month’s supply, will require a special permit called a Yakkan Shoumei. Applications for a Yakkan Shoumei should be submitted to one of the Narcotics Controls Departments (NCDs) in Japan at least two weeks in advance. These regulations may change at any time, so check the Japan Ministry of Health, Labour, and Welfare website before your trip to ensure you have the most up-to-date information. For more specifics regarding medication restrictions, you can contact the Japan Ministry of Health, Labour, and Welfare by phone or email. Contact information is available on the website. Buy travel and medical insurance When it comes to travel, many people wonder whether they should buy insurance. However, before you can make a decision, you need to know about the two types of insurance: travel insurance and travel medical insurance. Yes, there is a difference (but most insurance options include both). Standard travel insurance covers the financial investments of trips such as lost luggage, travel delays, and cancelled trips in certain situations (such as illness, a death in the family, or a natural disaster). Standard travel medical insurance covers healthcare costs incurred while out of the country (for example, if you end up having to visit the hospital or need emergency medical evacuation). If you were going on a last-minute or cheap domestic flight, you would probably pass on the travel insurance, because you don’t have a ton of money at risk and your normal health insurance plan should cover any potential medical emergencies. However, for a trip to Japan, where you’ve invested a significant amount of money and your normal health insurance won’t cover you, you definitely should get travel insurance. Getting travel insurance will ensure that you don’t lose out on the thousands of dollars you likely spent on plane tickets, hotel accommodations, and Olympic event tickets. Many large events have been cancelled to prevent the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic. While no determination has been made, it’s a wise idea to buy travel insurance. Many travelers turn to World Nomads or Allianz Travel for insurance as their policies offer both traditional travel insurance, as well as medical insurance. Also, check with your credit card provider. Many travel credit cards offer travel insurance and travel medical insurance as additional benefits. Understand Japanese entry requirements The good news is that if you’re a U.S. citizen and will be in Japan for less than 90 days (which you most likely will be), you won’t need a visa. Just be aware that all visitors entering visa-free will be fingerprinted and photographed upon arrival. More information on this can be found on the Embassy of Japan in the United States of America website. If you’re not a U.S. citizen, you can check the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Japan website to determine whether you need a visa. In order to enter the country, you need at least one blank page in your passport for the entry stamp and you must have proof of onward travel (proof that you’ll be leaving Japan), such as a booked flight. Also, be aware that Japanese immigration officers have the right to deny you entry if you appear to have no visible means of support (no credit cards, debit cards, cash, or other means of supporting yourself financially), so make sure you have at least one of these with you.

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Top 10 Things to Do in Tokyo

Article / Updated 03-06-2020

Every destination has “must-do” activities and attractions and Tokyo is certainly no exception. If you plan to travel to Tokyo, make sure you take in the sights. You know, the ones that friends and family back home will be like, “You mean to tell me you went to Tokyo and didn’t do x?” If you’re trying to avoid that reaction, this information is for you. Tsukiji Outer Market and Toyosu Market The original Tsukuji Fish Market consisted of two different parts: the inner market (a wholesale market) and the outer market. However, in October 2018, the inner market was moved to Toyosu and reopened as the Toyosu Market. The inner market, now Toyosu Market, is the world’s largest fish market. It’s such a popular spectacle that there are actually dedicated routes and observation windows specifically created for visitors to watch the auctions for tuna and other seafood and produce. If you would rather be up close and personal, you can apply for a lottery where winners can view the auction from a much closer location. However, auctions typically take place between 5:30 a.m. and 6:30 a.m., meaning you’ll need to wake up super early (or, you know, go to bed super late) if you want to catch the action. Not all travel websites and guidebooks have been updated since the move of the fish market. Do not go to the Tsukuji Market if you’re looking for the live auctions. The Tsukuji Outer Market, the original outer market from the Tsukuji Fish Market, is still open and lively. It consists of many shops and businesses, which are typically open from 5 a.m. to about noon or a little later. Because most shops get their food directly from the Toyosu Market, it’s one of the best places in Tokyo to get fresh seafood. Shinjuku Gyoen Given that Tokyo is a large metropolis, you may be surprised to learn that there are actually a significant number of parks and gardens located within Tokyo. It’s like Central Park in New York City, except that there’s more than one Central Park. Shinjuku Gyoen easily tops the list of best parks and gardens in Tokyo. From the 1600s to the mid-1800s, it was actually the home of a feudal lord before being transferred to the Imperial Family and eventually opened as a public park. It costs a few yen to enter, but it’s well worth the money. When you enter the park, it may seem like any other park at first, with just a dirt path leading you through some trees. However, after you make it into the core of the garden, you discover that it has so much more to offer than just a nice stroll. Inside, you’ll find not only a traditional Japanese landscape garden, but also a formal French garden and English landscape garden as well. If you have an hour or two between Olympic events, or just some free time to explore, make sure you take a stroll through the gardens, across the various Japanese-style bridges, around the traditional tea house, and through the conservatory. It’s a great way to get away from the hustle and bustle of the city! Meiji Jingu Meiji Jingu, or Meiji Shrine, is another great way to get away from the hustle and bustle of the city, but in a very different way. The shrine is located in the middle of a densely populated forest and dedicated to the spirits of the late Emperor Meiji and Empress Shoken. During his rule, referred to as the Meiji Period, Japan went through great reform, including the breakdown of social classes, improvements in communication and transportation, as well as changes in the education and currency systems. There are several different entrances to the grounds, making it easily accessible from both Harajuku Station and Yoyogi Station. From either of these entrances, it’s about a ten-minute walk to the main shrine buildings. Here, you can partake of typical practices performed at Shinto shrines: Purify yourself. Most shrines will have a purification fountain near the entrance as a way to cleanse yourself before approaching the gods. Use the ladle to wash your left hand and then your right. Some visitors use the ladle to pour water into their hands for rinsing out their mouths. Make an offering and pray. In the main hall, there will be an offering box where you can make an offering to the gods. Many choose to offer ¥5 because the Japanese phrase for ¥5 is 五円 (pronounced “go-en”), which similar to ご縁 (also pronounced “go-en” and typically translated as “luck” or “destiny” or even “it was meant to be”). Gently drop your offering in the box, ring the bell (if there is one), and then bow twice, clap twice, and bow once more. Then make your silent prayer. Buy a charm or amulet. Charms sold at Shinto shrines, referred to as omamori, are said to provide various forms of luck and protection. For example, there are omamori for happiness, education, good health, romance, and more. Hachiko Statue If you stumble across this statue near Shibuya Station by accident, you may think it’s just a statue of some random dog. However, the story behind it is quite incredible. There are a couple of different versions of the legend, but the main story is that Hachiko, an Akita dog, would go to Shibuya Station every day to meet his master on his way home from work. Even after his master passed away, Hachiko would continue to go to Shibuya Station to wait for his master every day until his own death nearly ten years later. If you have some time during the flight to Japan, try watching the movie Hachi: A Dog’s Tale, which is a remake of the original Hachiko Monogatari movie that tells the full story of Japan’s most faithful dog. Shibuya Crossing Right next to the Hachiko Statue is the Shibuya Crossing, also referred to as the Shibuya Scramble. It’s rumored to be the busiest intersection, not just in Japan, but in the whole world. During peak rush hour, there can be upwards of 3,000 people crossing at one time. Nothing says “Welcome to the largest metropolitan area in the world!” more than being one of the thousands of people crossing the intersection at once. After you’ve had your fill of the scramble, head up to one of the top floors in the nearby buildings to get a bird’s-eye view of the scramble. Senso-ji Senso-ji, also known as Asakusa Kannon temple, is Tokyo’s oldest temple. At the entrance of the temple grounds, you’ll find Kaminarimon, or “Thunder Gate.” As if the big red gate weren’t prominent enough, a gigantic paper lantern with the Japanese characters for Kaminarimon written on it hangs in the center. Beyond Kaminarimon, you’ll find Hozomon, the “Treasure House Gate,” which houses much of the temple’s treasures on the second floor. After you pass the two entrance gates, you’ll find yourself in front of the main hall. Unlike Meiji Jingu, which was a Shinto shrine, Senso-ji is a Buddhist temple, which means the rituals are a bit different. Try the following: Purify yourself. Temples often have purification fountains similar to shrines, but they also often have incense. The smoke is believed to have healing powers. For example, if you have a sprained wrist, you may use your good hand to wave the smoke toward your injured wrist. Make an offering and pray. The procedure for praying at temples is similar to shrines. However, instead of bowing twice, clapping twice, and bowing once more, you simply bow once, say your silent prayer, and then bow once more. Just outside the temple, you find Nakamise-dori, an entire street full of souvenir shops and food stalls. This street probably has the widest variety of souvenirs, but due to its popularity, it’s also a bit more expensive than usual. Tokyo Skytree With a height of 634 meters (693 yards), Tokyo Skytree is the tallest tower and second-tallest freestanding structure in the world. It’s almost the length of six football fields! Its great height makes it one of the best places in Tokyo to get a view of the city. It actually has two different observation decks: Tembo Deck: The Tembo Deck is approximately 350 meters (383 yards) up and has not only great views of the city, but also a souvenir shop, restaurant, and some glass panels on the ground that allow you to see all the way down to the base of the tower. Tembo Gallery: The Tembo Gallery is 450 meters (492 yards) up and is more of a conventional observation deck. It’s also on the list of top-ten highest observation decks in the world. Go just before sunset and then hang around until evening. This way, you can see the city during the day, but also when it’s completely lit up at night. Takeshita-Dori If you want to see some crazy Tokyo street fashion, this is the place to be. Located just in front of Harajuku Station, this street is chock-full of fashion-forward shops and restaurants. If you stop by on a weekend, you’ll likely see all sorts of young adults dressed in everything from neon-colored outfits to full punk-goth clothing. If nothing else, it’s a great place to people-watch, as well as pick up some tasty sweets and candy. If you’re not a fan of crowds (and if you are, you chose the wrong city to visit), stop by during the day on a weekday. The narrow street will be much less crowded, allowing you to explore the shops and enjoy the crêpes and other desserts with much less stress. Purikura Purikura is actually a shortened version of the Japanese phrase Purinto Kurabu, or “Print Club.” To the unsuspecting passerby, it may seem like a typical photo booth you may see at your local mall. However, these photo booths have some fancy upgrades (think: Snapchat filters meets photo booth). When you enter the photo booth, you’ll be able to take four to six photos. When you’re done, you can go around to the other side of the photo booth where you can apply filters, make edits, and add stamps and stickers. In general, they tend to be a bit on the girly side, but guys can take some really cool photos, too! You’ll typically find purikura in arcades and game centers. Round1 Entertainment in the Ikebukuro district of Tokyo is a good place to start. The SEGA game centers in Ikebukuro and Akihabara, as well as the Adores arcades in Shinjuku, Shibuya, Ueno, Ikebukuro, and Akihabara are also great places for finding a variety of purikura. Don Quijote Don Quijote, sometimes shortened to Donki, is one of the largest discount stores in Japan. Many times these stores are so packed full of goods, it’s practically impossible to look at everything! However, this also means it’s one of the best places to pick up those random little things you forgot at home. So, why did a discount store make it onto the list (albeit the bottom of the list) of the top ten things to do in Tokyo? It’s a great place to find those unique, only-in-Japan types of items that make for great souvenirs. Here you can find USB sticks that look like popular Japanese snacks and matcha (green tea) flavored snacks (the Kit-Kats are especially popular). They also typically have other common souvenirs such as keychains, hats, chopsticks, and yukata (traditional Japanese summer clothing) for reasonable prices. Some even have hanko vending machines, where you can get a personalized hanko (Japanese seal) with your name on it.

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4 Customs to Know for Traveling in Japan

Article / Updated 03-06-2020

Whether you’re heading to Japan for a quick visit or a longer stay, there are a few Japanese traditions and customs you’ll want to know. If you’ve never been to Japan, or Asia in general, you’ll most likely experience a bit of culture shock. The Japanese way of life isn’t terribly different from the English-speaking world, but there are enough differences to take you out of your comfort zone. Knowing the differences can help make the transition smoother and ensure you don’t embarrass yourself or get yourself into trouble. Stay to the left When you go up the steps, which side of the steps do you stay on? When you walk down the sidewalk, which part of the sidewalk do you usually walk on? Did you by chance answer the right side? If you live in a country where people drive on the right side of the road, you probably also tend to stay to the right when you’re walking. In Japan, driving and walking are done on the left side. This takes most Americans a while to adjust to because it’s the common habit to stay on the right. If you do it without thinking, you may find yourself facing a sea of oncoming people on the sidewalk. The same also applies to escalators. If you plan to stand on an escalator, make sure to stand on the left side. This keeps the right side clear for people who want to walk up or down the escalator. The exception to this rule is when you’re in the Osaka and Kyoto area (approximately four hours west of Tokyo by bullet train). For whatever reason, people who live in this area stand on the right side of the escalator while keeping the left side clear for those who want to walk up it. Don’t worry if you can’t remember which part of Japan walks on which side of the stairs. When in Japan, do as the Japanese do, and just follow what everybody around you is doing. Remove your shoes If you go over to a friend’s house, do you typically remove your shoes inside the doorway before entering the rest of the house? Depending on your own habits, and your friend’s preferences, you may or may not leave your shoes on. In Japan, removing your shoes when entering somebody’s home or apartment is much more important than it sometimes is in the rest of the world. Historically, Japanese people often slept and even ate on the floor, so it was very important for the floors to be clean. Thus, removing shoes was a must. Even though most Japanese people have Western-style dinner tables and beds now, they still take off theirs shoes before entering the house. The likelihood of your entering somebody’s home during your time in Japan is probably pretty slim (unless you have friends in the area). However, depending on what kind of hotel or apartment you stay in, you may be asked to remove your shoes before entering. You’ll most likely be given slippers to put on. On the off chance that you aren’t given slippers, just walk around in your socks or go barefoot. If you have to use the restroom while visiting, you’ll find a separate pair of slippers to slip on while in the restroom. Just make sure to put on your original pair of slippers again when you exit the restroom and leave the toilet slippers for the next person using the restroom. You may also encounter this custom when visiting various places of cultural significance, such as shrines and temples. You may also occasionally be asked to remove shoes before entering dressing rooms at clothing stores. Be considerate of others Given Japan’s very dense population, especially in bigger cities like Tokyo, things can be quite crowded. Most Japanese people are very aware of the fact that many actions they take will have a direct impact on those around them. Japanese society, in general, has a very group-oriented way of thinking, as opposed to other countries, such as the United States, where people have a more individualist mentality. As such, Japanese people generally will go to great lengths to be polite and avoid irritating others. They don’t play music very loud and people refrain from talking on the train (whether to traveling companions or on the phone). That’s not to say that one way of thinking is better than another (all societies have their issues), but it’s something to keep in mind while in Japan. In general, make more of an effort than you may normally to stay aware of your surroundings and be cognizant of how your actions may be affecting those around you. Keep germs to yourself In the Western world, if people are sick, they tend to keep to themselves. They may do their best to avoid coming into contact with others, such as shaking somebody’s hand. However, because of how crowded cities are, this can be very hard to do in Japan. As such, you often see people wear surgical masks to help prevent others from getting sick. You also see healthy people wear them in an effort to avoid getting sick themselves.

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How to Travel Around Japan: Modes of Transit

Article / Updated 03-06-2020

There are four main ways to get around Japan: public transit (including trains and local buses), highway buses, a rental car, and taxis and ride shares. During the Tokyo 2020 Olympics, the Tokyo Organizing Committee of the Olympic and Paralympic Games recommends using public transit in order to get between the venues and your accommodations. For that reason, this information primarily focuses on public transit. However, if you travel outside of Tokyo to do some exploring, you may find the other methods of transit useful. Public transit in Japan: Trains and local buses In large cities, such as Tokyo and Osaka, trains and subways serve as the primary mode of transportation. Local buses in these areas serve as the secondary method of transit and often extend the train and subway networks. In other less dense cities and rural areas, buses serve as the primary method of transit. Japan’s public transit system is incredibly extensive and allows travelers to get most places they want to go with ease. However, its size can also be a bit intimidating. Plenty of guides are available to help you navigate the system. The bus system can be a little confusing, if only because it seems to vary depending on where you are. In Tokyo In Tokyo, buses are typically a flat fee, which varies by what route you take. You enter through the front door and pay for your fare when you enter. This can either be done with cash or with an IC Card. If you don’t have exact change for the bus fare, there is usually a coin machine located at the front of the bus to get change. An electronic display at the front of the bus will display what stop is coming up next, and a button located along the wall of the bus or sometimes even on the railings allows you to indicate to the driver that you’d like to get off at the next stop. For the Tokyo buses, you typically exit out the back door (it’s called the back door, but it’s usually in the middle of the bus). Outside Tokyo Outside Tokyo, things work a bit differently. Fares are typically calculated by distance traveled (unless you’re in Kyoto, which also has a flat-rate system). For this reason, you typically board the bus in the back, not the front. If you plan to pay by cash, grab a ticket from the ticket machine near the door. If you want to use your IC Card, tap your IC Card to the reader near the back entrance. Like the Tokyo buses, other buses around Japan have a button that you can use to indicate to the driver when you want to stop. However, the display board will likely look a bit different from the Tokyo buses. The display boards for these buses also display the prices for each stop, depending on where you boarded the bus. When you go to get off at your stop, head to the front of the bus. If you got onto the bus using your IC Card, tap your IC Card to the reader near the front door, and then you’re free to exit. If you took a ticket, you’ll want to insert your ticket into the fare box and then insert the exact change before exiting the bus. Highway buses in Japan Highway buses are popular for long-distance travel. They’re slower than other methods of transit, such as the bullet train, but they’re often much cheaper (unless you have a Japan Rail Pass). You can use a highway bus when going long distances because they offer the option to take an overnight bus. That means you don’t have to spend valuable daylight hours traveling. Plus, it’s one less night you have to pay for a hotel. However, highway buses are definitely not as comfortable as hotel beds, so it’s a tradeoff. Personally, the only time you would likely choose to use a highway bus over the bullet train is if you were traveling a long distance and didn’t have a Japan Rail Pass. If you opt to take a highway bus, try Willer Express. They provide fantastic experiences and they travel to most major destinations in Japan. Note that most, if not all, highway buses require advance reservation and typically do not accept IC Cards as payment, like local buses do. Willer Express accepts credit cards, as well as payments at local convenience stores, such as Lawson and Family Mart. If possible, make reservations as far as advance as possible, because there will likely be many people traveling around the time of the Tokyo Olympics. If you plan on using highway buses frequently, you may also want to look into the Japan Bus Pass. You can purchase a three-day, five-day, or seven-day version of the pass and can be used on up to three Willer Express operated buses per day. Rental cars in Japan In order to be able to rent a car in Japan, you’ll need to obtain an International Driving Permit (IDP) or Japanese driving license. You can’t drive in Japan with just your U.S. driver’s license. The IDP is a translation of your personal information, including your driving information, into 10 different languages. Unless you plan on moving to Japan, an IDP will suffice for your driving needs. Most IDPs are valid for one year. If you already have an IDP, make sure yours will be valid for the duration of your trip to Japan. If you considering renting a car in Japan, you must obtain your IDP before departing for Japan, because you won’t be able to obtain an IDP while in Japan (unless you can afford to wait four to six weeks for AAA to ship one to you). Lastly, you must be at least 18 years old to be able to drive in Japan. If you’re 18 and you have your IDP, you’re ready to rent your car. Popular car rental companies in Japan include: Ekiren Nippon Rentacar Nissan Rentacar Orix Rentacar Times Car Rental Toyota Rentacar Other car rental companies you may be familiar with (including Alamo, Budget, Enterprise, National, and others) also have services in Japan but may or may not be more expensive than the top rental car companies in Japan. Taxis and ride shares in Japan Not so fun fact: Using private vehicles for ride sharing is prohibited by law in Japan. However, that doesn’t mean that popular ride-sharing services such as Uber don’t exist in Japan. In fact, Uber does offer services in Japan, but it has partnered with local taxi companies in order to be able to do so. That said, Uber is not as popular in Japan as it is in the United States, and it may not necessarily be the cheapest option. In Japan, taxis are still a very popular method of travel in areas where public transit is infrequent or unavailable. You can hail them from the side of the road or find them at taxi stands (usually located in front of train stations). Although it may be counterintuitive, a red light on the dash of the car indicates that the taxi is vacant and available for rides, and a green light indicates that the car is occupied. Be aware that the left-rear door of the taxi door can be opened and closed remotely by the driver, so you’re not supposed to open or close the door of a taxi unless you’re using another one of the doors (the passenger door or right-rear door). Don’t be taken by surprise if the door automatically swings open as the taxi comes to a stop in front of you. Fares vary depend on the location where you’re catching the taxi and the size of the taxi. However, there is usually a flat fee for the first kilometer or two (a little over a mile). The fee then increases approximately every 300 meters (0.18 mile). There is also a waiting fare for if the taxi has to slow down or stop, such as getting stuck in heavy traffic. Lastly, if the taxi must travel by highway, any incurred highway fees (think toll roads) will be added to your fare. Not all taxis accept credit cards, and some may not have cash for large bills such as the ¥10,000 ($91.74), so it’s always best to keep some small bills of cash with you. Some taxis now also accept IC Cards.

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A Guide to Tokyo 2020 Olympics Ticket Prices

Article / Updated 03-06-2020

Buying tickets for the Olympics can be a little overwhelming. Below, you discover ticket prices for the Tokyo 2020 Olympics by event. Be aware that when looking at ticket prices online, you may see a couple of different numbers: Face value: The price that the ticket is being sold for in Japan. This number is sometimes displayed in yen or the U.S. dollar equivalent. Ticket price: Authorized Ticket Resellers (ATRs) are allowed to increase the price by up to 20 percent of the face value. This means that if the face value of the ticket is $106.73, ATRs can add up to $21.35 to the price of the ticket, and you can bet ATRs increase it the full 20 percent, meaning the actual price you would pay for the ticket in the United States would be $128.08. The tables below show the different prices for tickets for each Olympic event. The price displayed is the total amount you would pay for the ticket (including the price increase from the ATR). Tokyo 2020 Olympic opening and closing ceremonies The opening and closing ceremonies are likely some of the biggest events of the Olympics, and you can see that reflected in the prices. They’ve also been some of the hardest events to get tickets for. Both ceremonies will be held in the Olympic Stadium, which has a seating capacity of 68,000. Tokyo Olympics Opening and Closing Ceremonies Event A B C D E Opening $2,969.15 $2,406.37 $1,096.45 $494.86 $139.73 Closing $2,192.90 $1,775.67 $853.87 $397.83 $139.73 Aquatics The sport of aquatics consists of five different disciplines: artistic swimming, diving, marathon swimming, swimming, and water polo. The swimming, artistic swimming, and diving events will be held at the Tokyo Aquatics Center, which has a seating capacity of 15,000. Marathon swimming will be held at Odaiba Marine Park, which has a seating capacity of 5,500. Water polo will be at the Tatsumi Water Polo Centre, which has a seating capacity of 4,700. Artistic Swimming Event A B C D Preliminaries $160.68 $128.08 $81.50 46.57 Finals $494.86 $407.53 $203.76 $67.54 Diving Event A B C D Preliminaries $116.44 $93.14 $67.54 $40.75 Semifinals $145.55 $116.44 $81.50 $58.22 Finals $354.16 $285.28 $145.55 $93.14 Marathon Swimming Event A B All events $64.04 $40.75 Swimming Event A B C D Preliminaries $422.09 $349.31 $116.44 $67.54 Semifinals and finals $1,106.15 $756.84 $412.38 $137.40 Water Polo Event A B C Preliminaries $116.44 $93.14 $34.93 Quarterfinals $145.55 $116.44 $52.39 Semifinals $168.83 $133.91 $52.39 Finals $209.59 $169.83 $58.22 Archery Archery has a total five different types of events: women’s team, men’s team, mixed team, women’s individual, and men’s individual. All these events will be held at Yumenoshima Park Archery Field, which has a total seating capacity of 5,600. Archery Event A Preliminaries $34.93 Quarterfinals, semifinals, and finals $81.50 Athletics Athletics has three main disciplines: marathon, race walk, and track and field. However, tickets to the race walk are not for sale, so only the marathon and track-and-field events will have tickets available for purchase. The track and field events will be held at the Olympic Stadium, which has a seating capacity of 68,000. The marathon event was also originally scheduled to be held at the Olympic Stadium but was moved to Sapporo Odori Park. Unlike other sports, whose tickets prices are divided into stages of the competition (preliminaries versus finals), track-and-field events are divided into five different categories: morning preliminary, morning final 1, morning final 2, evening final 1, and evening final 2. This was done to allow different pricing levels based on the popularity of some of the events being held. Marathon Event A B C All events $69.86 $46.57 $29.11 Track and Field Event A B C D E Morning preliminaries $157.19 $128.08 $110.62 $69.86 $34.93 Morning final 1 $291.10 $221.23 $168.83 $81.50 $46.57 Morning final 2 $349.31 $244.52 $186.30 $93.14 $58.22 Evening final 1 $713.18 $582.19 $349.31 $116.44 $67.54 Evening final 2 $1,319.62 $1,106.15 $460.90 $137.40 $67.54 Badminton Like archery, badminton has five different types of events: women’s doubles, men’s doubles, mixed doubles, women’s singles, and men’s singles. All badminton events will be held at Musashino Forest Sport Plaza, which has a seating capacity of 7,200. Badminton Event A B C D Preliminaries $157.19 $128.08 $81.50 $46.57 Quarterfinals and semifinals $244.52 $195.61 $149.04 $87.32 Semifinals and finals $494.86 $407.53 $203.76 $93.14 Baseball and softball The baseball events and softball events will be held at two different stadiums: Fukushima Azuma Baseball Stadium and Yokohama Baseball Stadium. Given that Yokohama Baseball Stadium has a seating capacity of 35,000, while Fukushima Azuma Baseball Stadium only has a seating capacity of 14,300, ticket availability may depend on which stadium the event is being held at. Baseball Event A B C D Preliminaries (Fukushima) $157.19 $128.08 $81.50 $46.57 Preliminaries (Yokohama) $180.48 $139.73 $93.14 $46.57 Knockout stage $267.80 $209.59 $139.73 $69.86 Semifinals $359.02 $279.44 $186.30 $93.14 Bronze-medal match $494.86 $407.53 $232.87 $104.80 Finals $713.18 $582.19 $349.31 $116.44 Softball Event A B C D Preliminaries (Yokohama), one match $93.14 $81.50 $58.22 $29.11 Preliminaries (Yokohama), two matches $150.83 $120.67 $84.47 $42.23 Preliminaries (Fukushima) $150.83 $120.67 $84.47 $42.23 Semifinals $209.59 $168.83 $93.14 $46.57 Finals $296.92 $232.87 $149.04 $87.32 Basketball Basketball is actually split into two disciplines: basketball (the traditional basketball you see on TV; and 3x3 basketball. The regular basketball games will be held at Saitama Super Arena (with a seating capacity of 21,000), while the 3x3 basketball events will be Basketball Event A B C D Women’s preliminaries $116.44 $93.14 $58.22 $34.93 Women’s quarterfinals $209.59 $168.83 $110.62 $69.86 Women’s semifinals $296.92 $232.87 $149.04 $87.32 Women’s finals $494.86 $645.26 $460.90 $218.90 Men’s preliminaries $285.28 $203.76 $145.55 $67.54 Men’s quarterfinals $582.19 $480.30 $349.31 $116.44 Men’s semifinals $756.84 $616.15 $412.38 $137.40 Men’s finals $1,106.15 $645.26 $460.90 $218.90 3x3 Basketball Event A B C Preliminaries $128.08 $93.14 $34.93 Quarterfinals $174.66 $116.44 $58.22 Semifinals $186.30 $139.73 $81.50 Finals $209.59 $174.66 $104.80 Boxing The schedule for boxing was released significantly later than the rest of the event schedule due to some conflicts with the International Boxing Association (AIBA), which was considered the “governing body” of the sport. After AIBA was suspended by the International Olympic Committee (IOC), a taskforce was put in place and the event schedule was finalized in July 2019. Boxing events will be held at the Kokugikan Arena, which has a seating capacity of 7,300. Like many combat sports, competitions are divided by weight class, ranging from Fly (the lightest weight class) to Super Heavy for the men, and Fly to Middle for the women. Boxing Event A B C D Preliminaries $150.83 $118.25 $78.43 $42.23 Quarterfinals $187.03 $144.80 $114.64 $72.40 Semifinals $253.40 $202.72 $154.45 $90.50 Finals $512.83 $422.33 $211.16 $96.33 Canoe Canoeing contains two different disciplines: slalom and sprint. The slalom discipline includes both the canoe slalom and kayak slalom events, which will be held at the Kasai Canoe Slalom Centre (with a seating capacity of 7,500). The sprint discipline includes various events, including single kayaks, double kayaks, single canoe, and double canoe, covering anywhere from 200 meters to 1,000 meters in distance. These events will be held at the Sea Forest Waterway (with a seating capacity of 12,800). Canoe – Slalom Event A B C Preliminaries $64.04 $46.57 $34.93 Semifinals and finals $116.44 $81.50 $58.22 Sprint Event A B C Preliminaries and quarterfinals $64.04 $40.75 $34.93 Semifinals and finals $110.62 $67.54 $58.22 Cycling Cycling contains a total of five different disciplines. The two BMX disciplines — freestyle and racing — will be held at the Ariake Urban Sports Park. During the BMX racing events, the venues will have a seating capacity of 5,000, but during the BMX freestyle events it will have a seating capacity of 6,600. The track and mountain bike disciplines will be held in Izu. The Izu Velodrome, which will be used for the track event has a seating capacity of 3,600, while the Izu MTB Course for the mountain bike events has a seating capacity of 11,500. Fuji International Speedway serves as the finish for the road race and can seat 22,000. BMX Freestyle Event A B Preliminaries $46.57 $29.11 Finals $116.44 $58.22 BMX Racing Event A B Quarterfinals $64.04 $34.93 Semifinals and finals $145.55 $81.50 Track Event A B C All $168.83 $93.14 $46.57 Mountain Bike Event A All events $58.22 Road Race Event A B All events $64.04 $40.75 Equestrian The equestrian sport contains three different disciplines: dressage, eventing, and jumping. The eventing cross-country event will be held at Sea Forest Cross-Country Course, which has a seating capacity of 16,000. All other equestrian events will be held at the Equestrian Park, which can seat 9,300. Dressage Event A B C Preliminaries $75.68 $58.22 $34.93 Finals $186.30 $128.08 $64.04 Eventing Event A B C Eventing dressage preliminaries $75.68 $58.22 $34.93 Eventing cross-country preliminaries $46.57 N/A N/A Eventing jumping final $186.30 $128.08 $64.04 Jumping Event A B C Qualifiers $75.68 $58.22 $34.93 Finals $186.30 $128.08 $64.04 Fencing All fencing events will be held in Hall B of Makuhari Messe Hall, which has a seating capacity of 8,000. This will encompass both team and individual foil, epée, and sabre events. Fencing Event A B Preliminaries, quarterfinals, and semifinals $87.32 $34.93 Semifinals and finals $133.91 $75.68 Soccer Soccer events will be held in six different venues. Which dome the event is being held in will not only affect the seating capacity (ranging from 4,800 to 72,000) and number of available tickets, but also the distance you’ll have to travel in order to attend the event. You’ll want to keep both of these factors in mind when purchasing tickets. Soccer Event A B C D Women’s preliminaries, one match $75.68 $52.39 $40.75 $29.11 Women’s preliminaries, two matches $93.14 $69.86 $46.57 $34.93 Women’s quarterfinals $180.48 $93.14 $69.86 $46.57 Women’s semifinals $244.52 $149.04 $87.32 $67.54 Women’s finals $494.86 $285.28 $145.55 $87.32 Men’s preliminaries $114.11 $75.68 $64.04 $34.93 Men’s quarterfinals $244.52 $149.04 $87.32 $67.54 Men’s semifinals $354.16 $203.76 $145.55 $87.32 Men’s final $713.18 $349.31 $174.66 $114.11 Golf Both men’s and women’s golfing events, including both the preliminaries and finals, will be held at Kasumigaseki Country Club, which has a seating capacity of 25,000. Golf Event A Preliminaries $81.50 Finals $116.44 Gymnastics Gymnastics has three different disciplines: artistic, rhythmic, and trampoline. All events, including the floor routine, parallel bars, vaulting, and more will be held at the Ariake Gymnastics Centre, which will have a seating capacity of 12,000 for all disciplines and events. Artistic Event A B C Qualifications $296.92 $122.26 $46.57 Finals $756.84 $412.38 $137.40 Rhythmic Event A B C Qualifications $139.73 $110.62 $46.57 Finals $407.53 $203.76 $67.54 Trampoline Event A B C All $186.30 $128.08 $64.04 Handball Similar to other events, handball tickets are separated for men’s and women’s events, as well as the various competition stages (such as preliminaries, quarterfinals, semifinals, and finals). All events will be held at Yoyogi National Stadium, which has a seating capacity of 10,200. Handball Event A B C Preliminaries $110.62 $67.54 $40.75 Quarterfinals $116.44 $81.50 $46.57 Semifinals $133.91 $90.82 $64.04 Bronze-medal match $149.04 $93.14 $64.04 Finals $232.87 $149.04 $87.32 Hockey Both men’s and women’s hockey events will be held at Oi Hockey Stadium (with a seating capacity of 15,000). Ticket prices vary based on which stage of the competition you’re watching. Hockey Event A B Preliminaries $46.57 $29.11 Quarterfinals $87.32 $52.39 Semifinals $110.62 $58.22 Finals $116.44 $69.86 Judo Judo features a total of 15 different events — 7 for men, 7 for women, and a mixed team event. Events for men and women are separated by weight class. All 15 events will be held at Nippon Budokan, which has a seating capacity of 11,000. Judo Event A B C D Eliminations and quarterfinals $180.48 $139.73 $93.14 $46.57 Semifinals and finals $582.19 $480.30 $349.31 $116.44 Karate Karate is one of the new sports making its debut at the Tokyo 2020 Olympics, and, like many martial arts events, it will be held at Nippon Budokan (with a seating capacity of 11,000). It features two main events: kumite, which is divided into various weight classes, and kata. Karate Event A B C D Eliminations $93.14 $75.68 $58.22 $40.75 Eliminations, semifinals, and finals $149.04 $128.08 $81.50 $64.04 Modern pentathlon The modern pentathlon is a sport that combines five different events into one. The first is a fencing ranking round, which is held at the Musashino Forest Sport Plaza (with a seating capacity of 7,200). The other four events (swimming, fencing bonus round, riding, and laser-run) will all be held at the Tokyo Stadium (with a seating capacity of 4,800). Modern Pentathlon Event A B Preliminary (fencing ranking) $29.11 N/A Final $46.57 $29.11 Rowing Rowing has two main events — sculling and sweep — both of which will be held at Sea Forest Waterway (with a seating capacity of 16,000). The sculling events are further divided into single, double, and quadruple sculls, while the sweep events are divided into the pairs, fours, and eights events. Rowing Event A B C Heats, quarterfinals, and semifinals $64.04 $40.75 $34.93 Semifinals and finals $110.62 $67.54 $58.22 Rugby The women’s rugby events will return to the Olympics after making its debut in the Rio 2016 Olympics. Both men’s and women’s rugby events will be held at Tokyo Stadium, which has a seating capacity of 4,800. Rugby Event A B C D Women’s preliminaries $87.32 $58.22 $46.57 $29.11 Women’s quarterfinals $116.44 $93.14 $58.22 $40.75 Women’s semifinals $133.91 $90.82 $64.04 $46.57 Women’s finals $168.83 $110.62 $69.86 $52.39 Men’s preliminaries $116.44 $93.14 $58.22 $40.75 Men’s quarterfinals $168.83 $133.91 $75.68 $46.57 Men’s semifinals $186.30 $145.55 $81.50 $64.04 Men’s finals $296.92 $232.87 $145.55 $87.32 Sailing Sailing will have two new events for the Tokyo 2020 Olympics: the 49er FX Skiff for women and the Nacra 17 as a mixed events. These will be joined by traditional events such as the Laser, RS:X, 470, 49er, and Finn. All sailing events will be held Enoshima Yacht Harbour, with a seating capacity of 3,600. Sailing Event A Preliminaries $34.93 Finals $64.04 Shooting Shooting contains two main disciplines: rifle and pistol and shotgun. The rifle and pistol discipline contains a total of seven different events — some for men, some for women, and some for mixed teams. The events are separated by type of weapon shot and distance shot from. The shotgun discipline contains two different types of events — trap and skeet — which are also further divided into separate events for men, women, and mixed teams. All shooting events are held at the Asaka Shooting Range, but seating capacity (and, therefore, available tickets) will vary based on the event. For the rifle and pistol qualifications events, the range will only have a seating capacity of 800, but for the rifle and pistol finals, it will having a seating capacity of 2,400. The shotgun events will have a seating capacity of 3,000. Rifle and Pistol Event A Preliminaries $29.11 Finals $46.57 Preliminaries and finals $64.04 Shotgun Event A Preliminaries $29.11 Preliminaries and finals $46.57 Skateboarding Skateboarding has two different disciplines: park and street. Events for these disciplines will be divided into men’s and women’s events, but all skateboarding events will be held at Ariake Urban Sports Park (with a seating capacity of 7,000). Park Event A B Women’s events $93.14 $46.57 Men’s events $133.91 $64.04 Street Event A B Women’s events $93.14 $46.57 Men’s events $133.91 $64.04 Sport climbing Sport climbing is making its debut at the Tokyo 2020 Olympics and will be held at the Aomi Urban Sports Park (with a seating capacity of 8,400). For this sport, the different types of sport climbing have been combined into one event (instead of being separated into different events, as is typically done for other sports). This means that bouldering, lead, and speed climbing will all be part of the competition. Sport Climbing Event A B Qualifications $58.22 $34.93 Finals $145.55 $69.86 Surfing Surfing is another one of the new sports making its debut at the Tokyo 2020 Olympics. It will be held in the form of an Olympic Surfing Festival, which will be held at the Tsurigasaki Surfing Beach (with a seating capacity of 6,000) instead of an artificial wave pool, so the festival has been scheduled for a total of eight days (even though it can be completed in four days) to allow for optimal wave conditions. Surfing Event A All events $34.93 Table tennis Table tennis events will be held at the Tokyo Metropolitan Gymnasium (with a seating capacity of 7,000) and will be divided into individual men’s and women’s events, men’s and women’s team events, and mixed team events. Table Tennis Event A B C Preliminaries $114.11 $75.68 $40.75 Quarterfinals $149.04 $93.14 $64.04 Semifinals $168.83 $110.62 $69.86 Semifinals and finals $407.53 $203.76 $93.14 Tae kwon do Like other martial arts sports, tae kwon do events will be divided into men’s and women’s events, and further divided by weight class. All tae kwon do events will be held in Hall A of the Makuhari Messe Hall, which has a seating capacity of 10,000. Tae Kwon Do Event A B C Preliminaries, quarterfinals, and semifinals $64.04 $46.57 $34.93 Semifinals and finals $110.62 $75.68 $58.22 Tennis Tennis has three different types of events: singles, doubles, and mixed doubles. All tennis events will be held at Ariake Tennis Park, which has a seating capacity of 19,900. However, note that Ariake Tennis Park has several different courts that matches will be held on, so availability of category B, C, and D tickets will depend on which court the event is being held on. Tennis Event A B C D Preliminaries $34.93 N/A N/A N/A Preliminaries and quarterfinals $139.73 $110.62 $69.86 $46.57 Quarterfinals and semifinals $232.87 $195.61 $149.04 $87.32 Bronze-medal match $285.28 $203.76 $93.14 N/A Finals $582.19 $480.30 $349.31 $116.44 Triathlon Although the triathlon traditionally consisted of separate men’s and women’s races, the Tokyo 2020 Olympics will be introducing a new event to the sport that consists of a mixed team relay. Both the men’s and women’s events, as well as the mixed team events, will take place at the Odaiba Marine Park (with a seating capacity of 5,500). Triathlon Event A B All events $93.14 $46.57 Volleyball Volleyball has two different disciplines: beach volleyball and indoor volleyball (which is known simply as volleyball). The beach volleyball events will be held at Shiokaze Park (with a seating capacity of 12,000), while the indoor volleyball events will be held at Ariake Arena (with a seating capacity of 15,000). Beach Volleyball Event A B C Preliminaries $133.91 $90.82 $40.75 Quarterfinals $168.83 $110.62 $69.86 Semifinals $232.87 $149.04 $87.32 Semifinals and finals $494.86 $285.28 $93.14 Volleyball Event A B C D Preliminaries $157.19 $128.08 $81.50 $46.57 Quarterfinals $244.52 $195.61 $149.04 $87.32 Semifinals $354.16 $285.28 $203.76 $93.14 Finals $582.19 $480.30 $349.31 $116.44 Weightlifting The weightlifting events, which will be held at the Tokyo International Forum (with a seating capacity of 5,000) are not only divided into men’s and women’s events, but are also divided into weight class. Weightlifting Event A B Eliminations $58.22 $29.11 Finals $149.04 $81.50 Wrestling Wrestling has two different styles: Greco-Roman and freestyle. Events are divided based on these styles and are further divided by weight class. Freestyle events are also further divided into men’s and women’s events while the Greco-Roman events will be men only. All wrestling events will be held in Hall A at the Makuhari Messe Hall (with a seating capacity of 10,000). Wrestling Event A B C D Preliminaries $157.19 $128.08 $81.50 $46.57 Finals $494.86 $407.53 $203.76 $93.14

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