Bartending For Dummies book cover

Bartending For Dummies

By: Ray Foley Published: 01-28-2014

Make and serve drinks like a pro

This latest edition of Bartending For Dummies features over 1,000 drink recipes in an A-Z format with clear, easy-to-follow instructions. This 5th Edition also provides over 40 new cocktails ideas for those who want to know how to serve cocktails professionally, for themselves, or for their guests.

  • Detailed information on how to properly stock a bar with the latest and greatest glassware and tools
  • Expanded coverage on making exotic frozen/blended specialties and specialty coffees
  • Experimenting with the new flavor/buzz in Bourbons and Scotches: honey
  • The latest flavored rums, gins, ryes, and of course vodkas (buttered, waffle, sherbet, and marshmallow flavored are just a few new editions)
  • New coverage devoted to craft distillers
  • Fun, new ways to garnish drinks (even flaming options), rim, and serve drinks like a master mixologist
  • Tips on creating unique punches and even non-alcoholic drinks
  • The latest tips and advice on curing hangovers and hiccups

If you're interested in crafting traditional or modern cocktails, Bartending For Dummies has you covered.

Articles From Bartending For Dummies

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73 results
73 results
Bartending For Dummies Cheat Sheet

Cheat Sheet / Updated 09-01-2021

Good bartenders pride themselves on being knowledgeable about cocktail recipes and proficient in the art of properly serving their guests and patrons. With a healthy repertoire of popular mixed drink recipes and the right ingredients at your fingertips, you can be the life of any gathering.

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What Bartenders Should Know about Scotch Whisky

Article / Updated 04-21-2017

Bartenders should definitely know about Scotch whisky. Scotch whisky (spelled without the e in whiskey) has a distinctive smoky flavor that's the result of both the choice of ingredients and the method of distillation. Scotch whisky must be distilled and matured for at least three years in Scotland — but not necessarily bottled in Scotland. Some Scotch whiskies are distilled and aged in Scotland but bottled in another country. Types of Scotch whisky Two kinds of Scotch whisky are distilled: malt whisky (from barley) and grain whisky (from cereals). Malt whiskies are divided into four groups according to the geographical location of the distillery in which they're made: Lowland malt whiskies: Made south of an imaginary line drawn from Dundee in the east to Greenock in the west. Highland malt whiskies: Made north of the aforementioned line. Speyside malt whiskies: Made in the valley of the River Spey. Although these whiskies come from within the area of the Highland malt whiskies, the concentration of distilleries and the specific climatic conditions in Speyside produce whiskies of an identifiable character, which is why they're classified separately. Islay malt whiskies: Made on the island of Islay. Credit: Illustration by Lisa Reed Each group has its own clearly defined characteristics, ranging from the gentle, lighter-flavored Lowland whiskies to those distilled on Islay, which are generally regarded as the heaviest malt whiskies. Grain distilleries are mostly found in the central belt of Scotland, near the cities of Glasgow and Edinburgh. Single-grain whiskies display individual characteristics in the same way as malts, although the geographical influence isn't the same. Married together, malt whiskies and grain whiskies create blended Scotch whisky, which accounts for 95 percent of world sales. A blended whisky can have many (up to 50) different types of malt whiskies blended with grain whisky (from cereals). As you may expect from the name, a single-malt Scotch whisky is made from one type of malt, and it's not blended with other malts or grain whiskies. How Scotch is made Making Scotch whisky from malts dates back to 1494 to Friar John Cor and his fellow friars. Until the mid-1800s, nearly all Scotches were single-malt. Then Andrew Usher came up with the idea of mixing malt whisky and grain whisky to create blended Scotch whisky. Here's how the process works: The barley is malted, or soaked and dried for germination. During this period, the starch in the barley converts to fermentable sugar. To stop the germination, the malted barley is smoked, usually over peat fires in open malt kilns, giving Scotch whisky its smoky taste. The barley is mixed with water and yeast. Fermentation takes place, and alcohol is the result. This liquid is then usually pumped into stills and double-distilled until the correct proof is attained. After distillation, the whisky is typically placed in used American oak wine or bourbon barrels (some distillers use sherry casks or wood from other countries); these are then aged by law for a minimum of three years. Most Scotch whiskies age from five to ten years, sometimes much longer. It's said that the longer a whisky ages in the barrel, the smoother it becomes. After the whisky finishes aging in the barrel, each distiller then completes its own blending, filtering, and bottling. Scotland has more than 100 distilleries that produce more than 2,000 different Scotch whiskies. Storing and serving suggestions Scotch can be served over ice, straight up, with water or club soda, or in a variety of mixed drinks. Single malts and aged Scotch whisky (over 12 years) can be served straight up or on the rocks with a splash of water. After opening, store a bottle of Scotch whisky in a cool, dry place out of direct light. It should have a shelf life of approximately two years. Whisky doesn't improve with age after it's bottled.

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Christmas Cookie Martini Recipe

Article / Updated 04-21-2017

Enjoy one of your favorite holiday treats, cocktail-style, without the effort and stress of slaving away over an oven all afternoon! It's sure to be a crowd-pleaser at your next holiday party. 1-1/2 oz. Irish cream liqueur 1-1/2 oz. coffee liqueur 1-1/2 oz. peppermint schnapps Pour Irish cream liqueur, coffee liqueur, and peppermint schnapps into a cocktail shaker with a generous handful of ice. Shake well, and pour into a martini glass. For extra festive flair, garnish the edge of your martini glass with sprinkles or red and green sugar crystals.

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Grinch Shots Recipe

Article / Updated 04-21-2017

The Grinch may be a mean one, but these shots aren't! Whether you shoot or sip to enjoy, these are sure to amuse at any holiday party. 1 oz. melon liqueur 1/2 oz. citrus vodka Combine melon liqueur and citrus vodka in a shot glass. Garnish with a toothpick and a maraschino cherry for extra Christmas flair. Enjoy!

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Yellow Snow Shot Recipe

Article / Updated 04-21-2017

A quick and easy drink to make for your next holiday party, this refreshing shot tastes much better than it sounds! Just remember to stay away from the yellow snow outside! 1 oz. citrus vodka 1 oz. pineapple juice Combine citrus vodka and pineapple juice in a shot glass. Sip or shoot to enjoy.

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Bartending Basics: How to Cut Fruit for Garnishes

Step by Step / Updated 04-21-2017

Many drinks require fruit garnishes. Your guests expect the garnish, so you can't forgo it, and you have to do it well. Presentation counts, big time. You may mix the best drinks on the planet, but if they don't look good when you serve them, no one's going to want to drink them.

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Bartending Basics: How Beer Is Made

Article / Updated 06-06-2016

All bartenders should be familiar with beer. The beer-brewing process begins with pure water, corn grits, and malted barley. Malted barley is the basic ingredient and is often referred to as the “soul of beer.” It contributes to the color and characteristic flavor of beer. Malted simply means that the barley has been steeped or soaked in water and allowed to germinate, or grow. Brewing beer is a step-by-step process: The corn grits and malt are cooked and blended to create mash. A sugary liquid, called wort, is extracted from the mash. The remaining solid portion of the mash, the brewer's grain, is sold as feed. The wort is transferred to the brew kettles, where it's boiled and hops are added. Hops are responsible for the rich aroma and the delicate bitterness in beer. The wort then moves to the wort cooler. Sterile air is added next, along with yeast, which converts sugar into alcohol and carbon dioxide. The wort moves to fermentation tanks for a carefully controlled time period. Brewers can use two different categories of yeast: bottom and top. Bottom yeast settles to the bottom of the tank after converting all the sugar, and the resulting beer is a lager. Top yeast rises to the top of the tank when it's done with the sugar, and the beer it produces is an ale.

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Popular Rum Brands Bartenders Should Know

Article / Updated 06-06-2016

Rum is produced throughout the Caribbean and beyond. There are several different types of rum, bartenders should know. Rum is required in different cocktail recipes, and is a very popular alcoholic drink. Here are several popular brands: 10 Cane (Trinidad) Admiral Nelson Spiced Rum (Puerto Rico) Angostura (Trinidad) Appleton Estate (Jamaica) Bacardi (Puerto Rico) Brinley (Saint Kitts) Captain Morgan Original Spiced Rum (Puerto Rico) Castillo (Puerto Rico) Cavalier (Antigua) Cockspur (Barbados) Cruzan Rum (U.S. Virgin Islands) DonQ Rums (Puerto Rico) English Harbour (Antigua) Fernandes Vat 19 Rum (Trinidad) Gosling's Black Seal Rum (Bermuda). Gosling also makes a Gold Rum and an Old Rum. Gran Blason Añejo Especial (Costa Rica) Havana Club (Cuba) Matusalem (Dominican Republic) Mount Gay Rum (Barbados) Myers's Original Dark Rum (Jamaica) Ocumare (Venezuela) Oronoco (Brazil) Pampero (Venezuela) Pusser's (Tortola, British Virgin Islands) Pyrat (Anguilla) Rhum Barbancourt (Haiti) Ron Del Barrilito (Puerto Rico) Ronrico (Puerto Rico) Ron Zacapa (Guatemala) Royal Oak (Trinidad) Sailor Jerry (U.S. Virgin Islands) Sea Wynde (Jamaica and Guyana) Stroh (Austria) Stubbs (Australia) Tanduay (Philippines) The Kraken Rum (Trinidad and Tobago) Tommy Bahama Rum (Barbados) Whaler's (Hawaii) Wray & Nephew (Jamaica) Zaya Rum (Trinidad)

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Bartending Basics: How to Flame an Orange Peel

Article / Updated 06-06-2016

Flaming the oil of an orange peel enhances the orange flavor in a cocktail, especially one made with Lillet, an orange-based aperitif. After this technique was introduced to bartenders in New York City, they ran with the idea and added it to various liquors such as bourbon, vodka, gin, rum, and so on. Follow these steps to flame an orange peel or any other variety of citrus. Cut off both ends of the orange. Insert a sharp knife or spoon between the rind and meat of the orange and carefully separate them. Cut the rind into strips. Make sure the citrus flesh is removed from the rind. Place a lit match between the cocktail and the twist, which should be rind-side down; bring the rind closer to the flame, approaching at a 45 degree angle from above. When the peel is very close to the match, give the peel a good squeeze with your thumb and forefinger to squirt the oil into the flame. A small burst of fire should brush the liquid in your glass. After it's lit, you can choose to drop the peel into the cocktail. Practice, practice, practice. After a while, it will come easy.

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Bartending Basics: How to Shake a Drink

Article / Updated 06-06-2016

As a bartender, you will probably be asked at some point to shake a drink. The main reasons for shaking drinks are to chill a cocktail, to mix ingredients, or to put a head or froth on some cocktails. As a general rule, you should shake all cloudy drinks (including cream drinks and sours), and you should stir all clear drinks. Never shake a cocktail that has carbonated water or soda. For some drinks, such as the Stinger or Martini, ask your guests whether they prefer them shaken or stirred. To shake a cocktail in a Boston shaker, follow these steps: Put some ice cubes (if called for in the recipe) in the glass container. Add the cocktail ingredients. Place the metal container over the glass container. Hold the metal and glass containers together with both hands and shake with an up-and-down motion. Make sure you always point the shaker away from your guests. That way you avoid spilling anything on them if the shaker isn't properly sealed. The two pieces of the shaker may stick together after you shake a drink. Never bang the shaker against the bar or any other surface or object; instead, gently tap it three or four times at the point where the glass and metal containers come in contact. When pouring or straining the cocktail, always pour from the glass container.

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