MATLAB For Dummies, 2nd Edition
Book image
Explore Book Buy On Amazon

You need to know which operators MATLAB supports, but remember them all isn't easy. The following table provides a brief summary of the operators that MATLAB supports.

Operator Type Description Example
- Arithmetic Subtracts the right operand from the left operand. 5 - 2 = 3
* Arithmetic Multiplies the right operand by the left operand. 5 * 2 = 10
^ Arithmetic Calculates the exponential value of the right operand by the left operand. 5^2 = 25
/ Arithmetic Divides the left operand by the right operand. 5 / 2 = 2.5000
Arithmetic Divides the right operand by the left operand. 5 2 = 0.4000
+ Arithmetic Adds two values together. 5 + 2 = 7
. Arithmetic Modifies operators to perform element-by-element arithmetic vis-à-vis matrix arithmetic. You receive no modification if you're operating on scalars (ordinary numbers). [1,2]*[3;4] = 11

[1,2].*[3,4] = [3,8]
= Assignment Assigns the value found in the right operand to the left operand. MyVar = 2 results in MyVar containing 2
bitand Bitwise Performs a logical and of the bits in two numbers. bitand(4, 5) = 4
bitor Bitwise Performs a logical or of the bits in two numbers. bitor(4, 5) = 5
bitget Bitwise Obtains the value of the bit at a specific location. bitget(4, 3) = 1
bitset Bitwise Changes the bit at the specified location. bitset(4, 1, 1) = 5
bitshift Bitwise Shifts the bits the specified number of positions. bitshift(2, 1) = 4
bitxor Bitwise Performs a logical exclusive or on the bits in two numbers. bitxor(4, 5) = 1
and Logical Determines whether both operands are true. and(true, true) = 1 (or true)

and(true, false) = 0 (or false)

and(false, false) = 0

and(false, true) = 0
not Logical Negates the truth value of a single operand. A true value becomes false and a false value becomes true. not(true) = 0

not(false)=1
or Logical Determines when one of two operands are true. or(true, true) = 1

or(true, false) = 1

or(false, false) = 0

or(false, true) = 1
xor Logical Determines when one and only one of the operands is true. xor(true, true) = 0

xor(true, false) = 1

xor(false, false) = 0

xor(false, true) = 1
all Logical Determines whether all the array elements are nonzero or true. all([1, 2, 3, 4]) = 1

all([0, 1, 2, 3]) = 0
any Logical Determines whether any of the array elements are nonzero or true. any([0, 1, 0, 0]) = 1

any([0, 0, 0, 0]) = 0
~= Relational Determines whether two values are not equal. 1 ~= 2 is 1 (or true)
< Relational Verifies that the left operand value is less than the right operand value. 1 < 2 is 1
<= Relational Verifies that the left operand value is less than or equal to the right operand value. 1 <= 2 is 1
== Relational Determines whether two values are equal. Notice that the relational operator uses two equals signs. A mistake many developers make is using just one equals sign, which results in one value being assigned to another. 1 == 2 is 0
> Relational Verifies that the left operand value is greater than the right operand value. 1 > 2 is 0
>= Relational Verifies that the left operand value is greater than or equal to the right operand value. 1 >= 2 is 0
- Unary Negates the original value so that positive becomes negative and vice versa. -(-4) results in 4 while -4 results in -4
+ Unary Provided purely for the sake of completeness. This operator returns the same value that you provide as input. +4 results in a value of 4

About This Article

This article is from the book:

About the book authors:

Jim Sizemore is professor of physics and engineering at Tyler Junior College. For over 25 years, Sizemore has worked in the semiconductor and software industries as a process engineer, device physicist, and software developer. John Paul Mueller has written more than 100 books and more than 600 articles on topics ranging from functional programming techniques to application development using C++.

This article can be found in the category: