Ham Radio For Dummies
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Soon, if you haven’t done so already, you’ll be thinking about upgrading. You have many more frequencies to use on the high-frequency (HF) bands, as shown in the following table. A complete chart of the U.S. frequency and mode privileges for all license classes is available from the American Radio Relay League (ARRL).
Band Frequencies (in MHz) Mode
160, 60, 30 meters All amateur privileges
80 meters 3.525–3.600 CW, RTTY, data
3.800–4.000 CW, phone, image
40 meters 7.025–7.125 CW, RTTY, data
7.175–7.300 CW, phone, image
20 meters 14.025–14.150 CW, RTTY, data
14.225–14.350 CW, phone, image
15 meters 21.025–21.200 CW, RTTY, data
21.275–21.450 CW, phone, image
17, 12, 10 meters All amateur privileges
Above 50 MHz All amateur privileges
CW = Morse code; RTTY = radioteletype.

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H. Ward Silver has the experience of a 20-year career as an electrical engineer developing instrumentation and medical electronics. He also spent 8 years in broadcasting, both programming and engineering. In 2000 he turned to teaching and writing as a second career. He is a contributing editor to the American Radio Relay League (ARRL) and author of the popular “Hands-On Radio” column in QST magazine every month. He is the author of the ARRL’s Amateur Radio license study guides and numerous other articles. He developed the ARRL’s online courses, “Antenna Design and Construction,” “Analog Electronics,” and “Digital Electronics.” Along with his comedic alter-ego, Dr Beldar, Ward is a sought-after speaker and lecturer among “hams.” When not in front of a computer screen, you will find Ward working on his mandolin technique and compositions.

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