Laptops For Dummies, 6th Edition
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You can use the Battery Saver to save power on your laptop. This discussion is brought to you by the word parsimonious. It’s a polite word for stingy, which is an excellent adjective to describe how the Windows 10 Battery Saver feature works.

The Battery Saver kicks in automatically when your laptop’s power percentage drops below a certain threshold — typically, 20 percent. You can, however, bolster the battery’s life by activating the Battery Saver at any time. Follow these steps:

  1. Display the Action Center.

    Swipe the screen from the right edge or, for non-touchscreen laptops, click the Notifications notification icon, as shown in the margin.

  2. Click or tap the Battery Saver button.

    If the button is disabled, the laptop is AC-powered, which means nothing needs saving.

When Battery Saver mode is active, the screen instantly dims. Laptop activity is curtailed, including Internet access. The idea is to power the laptop by using just a trickle of power. So don’t be surprised if some of your favorite laptop features or programs don’t work while Battery Saver is active.

To control the Battery Saver settings, follow these steps:

  1. Open the Settings app.

    Press the Win+I keyboard shortcut.

  2. Click the System button.

  3. On the left side of the window, choose Battery Saver.

    You can use the toggle on the right side of the screen to activate the Battery Saver, but instead:

  4. Click the Battery Saver Settings link.

  5. Ensure that a check mark is set by the item Turn Battery Saver On Automatically If My Battery Falls Below.

  6. Set the battery percentage.

    The value of 20 percent is fine.

  7. Set other options on the screen.

For example, keep the Push Notifications item off if you don’t need the laptop to check the Internet frequently for new email or other updates.

The Add an App item lets you select a program or an app that can ignore the restrictions applied by Battery Saver mode. For example, if you’re desperate to check the weather despite Wi-Fi network restrictions, you can add the Weather app to the list.

About This Article

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About the book author:

Dan Gookin has been an author, editor, ghostwriter, and a public official. He's written more than a dozen Dummies books on technology, with a special focus on PCs, the Android operating system, and Microsoft products. And in 1991, he was the author of the very first Dummies book, DOS For Dummies, which started the whole enterprise.

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