By David D. Busch

Good composition often involves playing all the angles — all of them. Don’t be satisfied with the different perspectives that you get with a 360-degree walk-around. Climb on a nearby rock or ladder, stand on a chair, or experiment with the view from a handy balcony. Or stoop low, lie on the ground, or get under your subject to see what a worm’s-eye view looks like.

Everybody shoots flowers from above the blossoms; you can take a picture down at the flower’s level.

Choosing an offbeat angle can help solve creative challenges, too. When the photographer went to shoot the Native American shown, he was dismayed by the unattractive background, which included canvas panels and bystanders. He laid down on the ground and shot upward at the subject, simultaneously isolating him from the distracting background and visually enhancing his stature.

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You might be surprised at how different everything looks from a new vantage point. Even hackneyed and clichéd subjects can take on new life if you choose the right angle. If you find yourself at a popular tourist location and all the people are clustered around a recommended picture spot while you’re flat on your back on the grass, you’re probably on the right track.