Word 2016 For Professionals For Dummies book cover

Word 2016 For Professionals For Dummies

By: Dan Gookin Published: 08-15-2016

The most comprehensive guide to Microsoft Word 2016

If you're a professional who uses Word, but aren't aware of its many features or get confused about how they work best, Word 2016 For Professionals For Dummies answers all your burning questions about the world's number-one word processing software. Offering in-depth coverage of topics you won't find in Word 2016 For Dummies, this guide focuses on the professional's needs, giving you all you need to know not only do your job well, but to do it even better.

As Microsoft continues to hone Word with each new release, new features are added beyond basic word processing. From using Word to create blog posts to importing data from Excel to expertly flowing text around objects, it covers the gamut of Word's more advanced capabilities—including those you probably don't know exist. Whether you're looking to use Word to build a master document, collaborate and share, publish an ebook, or anything in between, the thorough, step-by-step guidance in Word 2016 For Professionals For Dummies makes it easier.

  • Discover neat Word editing tips and tricks to create complex documents
  • Share documents and collaborate with others
  • Format text, paragraphs, and pages like never before
  • Add Excel charts and graphics to Word documents
  • Create an ebook

Essential reading for the Word power user who wants to be more productive and efficient at work, this handy guide gives you the boost to take your skills to the next level.

Articles From Word 2016 For Professionals For Dummies

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31 results
31 results
12 Word 2016 Function Key Shortcuts

Article / Updated 04-10-2017

Thanks to the Ribbon interface, Word 2016 is a lot easier to use than in the old keyboard days. Still, keyboard shortcuts linger. The function key commands here are listed as they are mapped within Word 2016. Other programs installed on your computer may hijack certain key combinations. Also, some laptop computers may require you to press the Fn key in combination with the function keys to fully access their features. F1 key shortcuts Unmodified Display the online Help for Word 2016. You can search for help, browse categories, and be otherwise baffled by the information displayed. Shift Display (or hide) the Reveal Formatting pane. Ctrl Show or hide the Ribbon. Alt Go to the next field. Shift+Ctrl Maximize the document window to fill the screen and hide the Ribbon. Shift+Alt Go to the previous field in the document. Ctrl+Alt Display the System Information window. F2 key shortcuts Unmodified Move To command. Select text and press F2. Click to position the insertion pointer, and then press the Enter key to cut and paste the selected block. Shift Copy To command. Select text and press Shift+F2. Move the insertion pointer and press Enter to copy the selected text. Ctrl Summon the Print Preview screen; the same as pressing Ctrl+P. Shift+Alt Save command; same as Ctrl+S. Ctrl+Alt Summon the Open dialog box. F3 key shortcuts Unmodified Insert building block. Type the first part of the building block text, and then press F3. Shift Change Case command. Press Shift+F3 to cycle between lowercase, uppercase, and Sentence Case formats. Ctrl Cut selected text and store it in the Spike. The Spike can contain a collection of cut items, similar to the Clipboard; however, spiked items are not stored in the Clipboard. Alt Create a new Building Block entry. After you press Alt+F3, the Create New Building Block dialog box appears. Shift+Ctrl Paste the contents of the spike. All spiked items (cut with Ctrl+F3) are inserted into the document. This is not the same command as Ctrl+V. F4 key shortcuts Unmodified Repeat command; the same as Ctrl+Y or Redo. Shift Repeat last browse object, such as Repeat Last Find or repeat the last Go To command, such as Go to Page. Ctrl Close the window; the same as the Ctrl+W command. Alt Quit the program. The Alt+F4 keyboard shortcut is the standard Windows command to close any window or program. Shift+Alt Close the window; the same as Ctrl+W and Ctrl+F4. F5 key shortcuts Unmodified Summon the Go To dialog box, or the Find and Replace dialog box with the Go To tab forward. Shift Move the insertion pointer to the last edit in the document. This command can be repeated four times to cycle through various locations. Ctrl Restore document window. Alt Restore program window. Shift+Ctrl Display the Bookmark dialog box. F6 key shortcuts Unmodified Cycle to the next open frame or pane. Shift Cycle to the previous open frame or pane. Ctrl Cycle to the next document window. Alt Cycle to the next document window; the same as Ctrl+F6. Shift+Ctrl Cycle to the previous document window. Shift+Alt Cycle to the previous document window; the same as Shift+Ctrl+F6. F7 key shortcuts Unmodified Proof the document. Shift Open the Thesaurus pane for the current word. Alt Move the insertion pointer to the next misspelled word. Shift+Ctrl Update Source command. This command applies to the IncludeText field and directs Word to update the contents based on the source document. Shift+Alt Open the Translation pane for the current word. Ctrl+Alt Summon the Korean-language spell checker. (A bug?) F8 key shortcuts Unmodified Activate extended selection mode. Use the cursor keys to extend the selection; type a character to extend the selection; press F8 again to select a larger document chunk. Shift Shrink the extended selection. Press Shift+F8 to undo the last F8 key press. Ctrl Change the window's size (though it doesn't work in Word 2016). Alt Display the Macros dialog box. Shift+Ctrl Enter block selection mode. In this mode, you select a rectangular chunk of text. Use the cursor keys or mouse to highlight a rectangle of text in the document. You can work with the block selection just as you can with any chunk of selected text. F9 key shortcuts Unmodified Update the current field: Click in a field and press the F9 key. The Ctrl+Shift+U key does the same thing. Ctrl Insert an empty field, a pair of curly brackets with nothing between them. Alt Toggle field codes for all fields in the document. Shift+Ctrl Convert the current field into plain text. Shift+Alt Simulate a user clicking on a field for programming macros. F10 key shortcuts Unmodified Display Ribbon accelerator-key shortcuts. Shift Nonfunctioning shortcut menu command. Ctrl Maximize the document window. Alt Show or hide the Selection pane. Shift+Ctrl Assigned to the WW2_RulerMode command, which no one knows anything about. Shift+Alt Displays the smart tag menu. F11 key shortcuts Unmodified Go to the next field in the document. Shift Go to the previous field in the document. Ctrl Lock the field. Alt Display the Visual Basic Editor. Shift+Ctrl Unlock the field. F12 key shortcuts Unmodified Summon the Save As dialog box. This command works whether or not the document has been saved. Shift Summon the Save As screen if the document hasn't already been saved. Ctrl Summon the Open dialog box. Shift+Ctrl Summon the Print screen; the same as Ctrl+P. Shift+Alt Activate the button on a selected content control.

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How to Write Message Pop-Ups Macros in Word 2016

Article / Updated 11-16-2016

The most basic type of programming, in Word 2016 or any other program, is code that spits out a simple message on the screen. In fact, most beginner programming books start out with a sample program to display the text Hello, World! Word macros are no different. The following macro, message_popup1, displays a dialog box with a single line of text and an OK button, as illustrated: Sub message_popup1() ' ' message_popup Macro ' Display a pop-up message ' MsgBox "This Word macro requires your attention", vbOKOnly, "Hey there!" End Sub The first argument to the MsgBox command is the text to display in the dialog box. The second argument, vbOKOnly, directs Word to show only the OK button. The final argument — "Hey there!" — is the dialog box's title, as shown here.

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How to Write Document Cleanup Macros in Word 2016

Article / Updated 11-16-2016

Before that final save, or any time you're working on a large document in Word 2016, consider doing some document cleanup. It's a process that involves searching for rogue characters and other problematic text. A document cleanup routine involves looking for trailing spaces at the end of paragraphs, double spaces, double tabs, and double Enter keys (empty paragraphs). These are all items to be avoided, but they end up in long documents anyway. The process of eliminating these unwanted elements involves using the Find and Replace dialog box. You need to use the Special button to input special characters, such as Space, Tab, and Enter. The macro created to perform the document cleanup chore recorded the keystrokes used to search and replace for the various characters. Then the Visual Basic Editor was used to remove some of the redundant code. Here is the result: Sub document_cleanup() ' ' document_cleanup Macro ' Remove trailing spaces and double spaces, tabs, and Enter keys ' Selection.HomeKey Unit:=wdStory Selection.Find.ClearFormatting Selection.Find.Replacement.ClearFormatting ' Remove trailing spaces from a paragraph With Selection.Find .Text = "^w^v" .Replacement.Text = "^v" .Forward = True End With Selection.Find.Execute Replace:=wdReplaceAll ' Remove double spaces With Selection.Find >.Text = " " .Replacement.Text = " " End With Selection.Find.Execute Replace:=wdReplaceAll ' Remove double tabs With Selection.Find .Text = "^t^t" .Replacement.Text = " ^t" End With Selection.Find.Execute Replace:=wdReplaceAll ' Remove double Enter keys (blank paragraphs) With Selection.Find .Text = "^v^v" .Replacement.Text = "^v" End With Selection.Find.Execute Replace:=wdReplaceAll End Sub The first search-and-replace operation removes trailing spaces. The search text is ^w^v, which looks for any white space (^w) characters before the Enter key (^v). These whitespace characters — space, tab, and so on — are replaced with the Enter key, which removes the trailing spaces. The second search-and-replace removes double spaces. press the spacebar twice for the search text and pressed the spacebar a single time for the replacement text. The third search-and-replace removes double tabs. The ^t represents tab characters in the Find and Replace dialog box. The final search-and-replace removes empty paragraphs. The ^v characters represent the Enter key, so replacing ^v^v with ^v removes any empty paragraphs. This macro works okay, but it could be better. For example, it doesn't handle triple spaces or triple tabs. You'd have to run the macro a second time for that. If you provide the programming talent, the macro's code can address those issues.

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A Double-Indent Paragraph Macro for Word 2016

Article / Updated 11-16-2016

A double-indent paragraph macro in Word 2016 modifies a paragraph's indentation, increasing both left and right attributes by half an inch. This effect could be applied by using a style, but a style sets the indentations to a specific value. When the macro is run, no matter what the current indentations are, the new values are a half-inch greater. Here is the code for the double_indent macro: Sub double_indent() ' ' double_indent Macro ' add half inch to both sides of the current paragraph ' pleft = Selection.ParagraphFormat.LeftIndent + InchesToPoints(0.5) pright = Selection.ParagraphFormat.RightIndent + InchesToPoints(0.5) With Selection.ParagraphFormat .LeftIndent = pleft .RightIndent = pright End With End Sub The macro takes the current paragraph indent values and adds a half-inch to each. These values are saved in the pleft and pright variables. The current paragraph's format is then modified, reset to those values. This macro cannot be faked with recorded keystrokes. You must code it directly. The Ctrl+M keyboard shortcut works similarly to the double_indent macro, but it affects only the paragraph's left indent value.

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How to Write Word 2016 Macros to Swap Text Elements

Article / Updated 11-16-2016

When working with documents in Word 2016, especially longer ones, you'll want the extra ease and FUNctionality of macros that can swap text words, phrases, or elements around. To create macros, you'll probably need the Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) programming language, which is vast, complex, and intimidating. That means it has great potential, but isn't something that you'll sit and learn in a casual afternoon. Here are a few "swapping" macros to help you get started in customizing your Word experience. Word swap in Word 2016 Here is a handy macro that you'll probably use all the time. The word_swap macro swaps two words. It cuts the first word and then pastes it after the second word: Sub word_swap() ' ' word_swap Macro ' Swap two words, left-right ' Selection.MoveRight Unit:=wdWord, Count:=1, Extend:=wdExtend Selection.Cut Selection.MoveRight Unit:=wdWord, Count:=1 Selection.Paste End Sub These keystrokes were recorded to make this macro: Ctrl+Shift+→ The word to the right of the cursor is selected. Ctrl+X The word is cut. Ctrl+→ The cursor moves after the second word. Ctrl+V The original word is pasted. Word macros cannot record mouse clicks. When you need to select text, use the cursor keys plus the Shift key, or use the F8 (extended selection) key. Also, for this macro to work, the insertion pointer must be positioned at the start of the first word. And/or word swap in Word 2016 Another word swap macro that you'll probably use frequently the and_or_word_swap macro. Unlike a regular word swap, the goal with this macro is to swap words on either side of a conjunction. For example, changing this or that to that or this. As with the word_swap macro, this macro was recorded from keystroke input: Sub and_or_word_swap() ' ' and_or_word_swap Macro ' Swap two words in a conjunction ' Selection.MoveRight Unit:=wdWord, Count:=1, Extend:=wdExtend Selection.Cut Selection.MoveRight Unit:=wdWord, Count:=1 Selection.Paste Selection.MoveRight Unit:=wdWord, Count:=1, Extend:=wdExtend Selection.Cut Selection.MoveLeft Unit:=wdWord, Count:=2 Selection.Paste End Sub Here are the keystrokes used to record this macro: Ctrl+Shift+→ Ctrl+X The first word is cut. Ctrl+→ The insertion pointer hops over the conjunction, and or or. Ctrl+V The word is pasted after the conjunction. Ctrl+Shift+→ Ctrl+X The word after the conjunction (now after the first word you pasted in Step 4) is selected and cut. Ctrl+←, Ctrl+← The cursor moves back to just before the conjunction. Ctrl+V The second word is pasted. The net effect of these keyboard shortcuts is to cut a word on one side of an and or or and then paste the word on the other side. Then the second word is cut and pasted before the and or or. For this macro to be effective, the insertion pointer must blink at the start of the first word. Swap sentences in Word 2016 Just as you can swap two words in a row, you can also swap two sentences. The swap_sentences macro does just that. And, as in other text manipulation macros, use the keyboard — not the mouse — to select text. In the following code, the Selection.Extend command represents pressing the F8 key on the keyboard. When you press that key three times, a sentence is selected. Sub swap_sentences() ' ' swap_sentences Macro ' Swap two sentences ' Selection.Extend Selection.Extend Selection.Extend Selection.Cut Selection.Extend Selection.Extend Selection.Extend Selection.EscapeKey Selection.MoveRight Unit:=wdCharacter, Count:=1 Selection.Paste End Sub Here are the keystrokes recorded to create the swap_sentences macro: F8, F8, F8 The current sentence is selected. Ctrl+X F8, F8, F8 The next sentence is selected. Esc, → The selection is canceled, and the insertion pointer is placed at the start of the next sentence. Ctrl+V The first sentence is pasted after the second sentence. When you run this macro, ensure that the insertion pointer is set somewhere within the first sentence. Swap header and footer text in Word 2016 The swap_header_footer macro swaps the document's header text and footer text. You could complete this process manually, but the problem is that the macro doesn't accurately record all the actions. So, although you can record the basic keystrokes, you must return to the Visual Basic Editor to complete the macro: Sub swap_header_footer() ' ' swap_header_footer Macro ' Exchange header/footer text ' If ActiveWindow.View.SplitSpecial <> wdPaneNone Then ActiveWindow.Panes(2).Close End If If ActiveWindow.ActivePane.View.Type = wdNormalView Or ActiveWindow. _ ActivePane.View.Type = wdOutlineView Then ActiveWindow.ActivePane.View.Type = wdPrintView End If ActiveWindow.ActivePane.View.SeekView = wdSeekCurrentPageHeader Selection.WholeStory Selection.Cut ActiveWindow.ActivePane.View.SeekView = wdSeekCurrentPageFooter Selection.HomeKey Unit:=wdLine Selection.Paste Selection.EndKey Unit:=wdLine, Extend:=wdExtend Selection.Cut ActiveWindow.ActivePane.View.SeekView = wdSeekCurrentPageHeader Selection.Paste ActiveWindow.ActivePane.View.SeekView = wdSeekMainDocument End Sub The overall effect of this macro is to edit the document's header, select and cut all that text, and then switch to the footer. Once in the footer, the header's text is pasted, and then the footer's text is selected and cut. The macro switches back to the header and pastes the footer's text. Then the macro closes the header.

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How to Place Parenthetical Text into a Word 2016 Footnote

Article / Updated 11-16-2016

One of the sins you can commit in writing a term paper or thesis is placing too many parenthetical notes on a page. Many professors appreciate it when you instead use footnotes. You'll also appreciate the parenthetical_to_footnote macro, which automates the process. Keystrokes were used to record this macro, but the insertion pointer must be precisely positioned for it to work: Click the insertion pointer before the parenthetical sentence, just before the period where you want the footnote to appear. The figure illustrates the positioning and the result after running the macro. Sub parenthetical_to_footnote() ' ' parenthetical_to_footnote Macro ' Convert parenthetical text following the cursor into a footnote ' Selection.Extend Selection.Extend Character:="(" Selection.EscapeKey Selection.MoveRight Unit:=wdCharacter, Count:=1 Selection.Extend Selection.Extend Character:=")" Selection.MoveLeft Unit:=wdCharacter, Count:=1, Extend:=wdExtend Selection.Cut Selection.MoveRight Unit:=wdCharacter, Count:=1 Selection.TypeBackspace Selection.TypeBackspace Selection.TypeBackspace Selection.TypeBackspace Selection.TypeText Text:="." Selection.MoveLeft Unit:=wdCharacter, Count:=1 With Selection With .FootnoteOptions .Location = wdBottomOfPage .NumberingRule = wdRestartContinuous .StartingNumber = 1 .NumberStyle = wdNoteNumberStyleArabic .LayoutColumns = 0 End With .Footnotes.Add Range:=Selection.Range, Reference:="" End With Selection.Paste End Sub The following keystrokes were used to create this macro. They're pretty complex: Press F8 and then the ( (left parenthesis) character. The F8 command enters extended selection mode. When you press a key, such as the ( key, text is selected up to and including that character. Esc, → Selection is canceled, and the → key moves the insertion pointer to the start of the parenthetical text. F8, ) Text is selected up to and including the ) character. ← The ) character is removed from the selection. Ctrl+X The parenthetical text is cut. The next few keystrokes remove the parenthesis and position the insertion pointer for the footnote. Backspace, Backspace, Backspace, Backspace, . (period), ← Click the References tab and, in the Footnotes group, click the Insert Footnote button. Ctrl+V The text is pasted into the footnote.

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How to Spike Text in Word 2016

Article / Updated 11-16-2016

When you're writing in Word 2016, especially if you're working on an academic paper or even a large fiction work, you might want to spike large chunks of text rather than delete them. To spike text, you select it and then move it down to the end of the document. When you're "done" writing, review your spikes to see whether anything is worth saving. Following is code for a spike_text macro that automates the process: Sub spike_text() ' ' spike_text Macro ' Move selected text to the end of the document ' If Selection.Type = wdSelectionNormal Then Selection.Cut Selection.EndKey Unit:=wdStory Selection.TypeParagraph Selection.Paste Application.GoBack Application.GoBack Else MsgBox "Nothing to spike" End If End Sub This macro contains an if-else structure. The if test determines whether text is selected. If so, the text is cut and pasted at the end of the document. When text isn't selected, the else part of the equation displays a message box with the text "Nothing to spike." This macro was recorded initially and used these keystrokes: Ctrl+X Ctrl+End Ctrl+V Shift+F5, Shift+F5 The Shift+F5 keyboard shortcut returns you to the previous editing location in the document. After recording the keystrokes, the if-else structure was added to ensure that the macro didn't display an ugly error message when text isn't selected. This process is part of defensive programming, where you anticipate that not every macro starts under ideal conditions. In this instance, a non-ideal condition is when text isn't selected.

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Word 2016 and the Backstage

Article / Updated 11-16-2016

Microsoft introduced the Backstage in Word 2013, and it's still available in Word 2016. It supplanted the traditional Save As and Open dialog boxes, replacing them with a full-window screen to augment their functions specific to cloud storage. The change also provided some consistency between the Save As and Open commands, as well as the Print and New commands. The old Save As and Open dialog boxes are still available when you need them, so it's good that you have a choice. Cloud storage is another term for Internet, or online, storage. It's integrated into your PC's local storage. Unlike with the Save As and Open dialog boxes, you cannot summon the old Print dialog box. Using the Backstage For both the Save As and Open commands, the Backstage provides quick access to recently opened files, folders, and storage locations. The figure illustrates both screens. A list of storage locations and options appears on the left side of the screen. These locations include Microsoft's OneDrive cloud storage as well as This PC, which represents local files (stored on your computer). Additional storage locations may appear, such as Google Drive, shown in the figure. The Browse button summons the old Save As and Open dialog boxes. On the right side of the Backstage appears a list of files. The files listed in the Save As Backstage are located in the current folder on the selected storage location. The files listed on the Open Backstage are recently accessed files. To quickly open a recent file, click it in the list. The Save As screen features options for saving the current document. The relevant part of the screen is illustrated here. The functions shown are identical to their counterparts in the traditional Save As dialog box. For a quick save, you can type the filename, optionally set the document (file) type, and then click the Save button. The More Options link simply surrenders the Backstage to the more practical Save As dialog box. The keyboard shortcut to access the Open screen is Ctrl+O. To access the Save As screen, press Ctrl+S, though this shortcut key works only on unsaved document. When you need to save a document under another name, in a new location, or with a new file type, access the Save As screen from the File tab. The Print-command keyboard shortcut is Ctrl+P, which summons the Print screen on the File tab. The Ctrl+W keyboard shortcut closes a document window, which is the equivalent of the Close command on the File tab. Removing a file from the Open Backstage The Open screen lists recently accessed files. Some of the files listed might be invalid, removed from their storage locations, renamed, or what-have-you. When that happens, Word doesn't remove the filenames from the list. Further, you might simply want to evict a file that you don't want lurking in the list. To do so, follow these steps: Press Ctrl+O to access the Open screen. You can also click the File tab and then choose Open from the left side of the screen. Right-click on the offending file. Choose the Remove from List command. And it's gone! If you access the file again, it shows up in the list again. If so, repeat the steps. Removing a document from the list of recent files doesn't delete the file. Adding a storage place to the Backstage Both the Save As and Open screens on the Backstage feature an enticing button labeled Add a Place. You would suppose that this button adds a new storage location, such as Dropbox or perhaps a favorite network drive. That's an inaccurate supposition, however; Word isn't as smart as you are. The Add a Place button is limited to adding only two storage locations: Microsoft's OneDrive cloud storage and an Office 365 SharePoint folder. Curiously enough, both of those locations are controlled by Microsoft. Further, the two items relate to collaboration more than other opportunities to connect to online storage resources. Summoning the traditional dialog boxes When you dearly miss the old Save As and Open dialog boxes, you can quickly summon them from the Backstage. The figure illustrates the locations where you can click in the Backstage to summon the traditional dialog boxes. To access the Save As dialog box, click the Browse button, the More Options link, or the folder pathname above the filename text box, as illustrated on the left. To access the Open dialog box, click the Browse button or the folder pathname, as illustrated on the right. The dialog boxes can also be accessed directly when you disable the Backstage. Disabling the Backstage When you've had enough with the Backstage, or find yourself ending up in the old Save As or Open dialog boxes often enough anyway, follow these steps to skirt the Backstage: Click the File tab. Choose Options. The Word Options dialog box appears. From the list on the left side of the dialog box, choose Save. Options for saving documents appear on the right side of the dialog box. Place a check mark by the option Don't Show the Backstage When Opening or Saving Files. It's the third check box from the top. Click OK. These steps affect the Ctrl+S and Ctrl+O keyboard shortcuts. You can still access the Backstage from the File tab: Choose Save As or Open. The Backstage still appears when you press Ctrl+P to print. Don't go looking for the old Print dialog box; it's been purged from Word. The Save As dialog box also appears when you attempt to close a document that hasn't been saved and you click the Save button.

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Word 2016 and Office 365

Article / Updated 11-16-2016

You can purchase Word 2016 as a stand-alone software program, or you can pay for a subscription to the Office 365 service. With Office 365, however, you get more: You get free updates to the latest version, up to five separate installations of Word (and the rest of the Office suite) on PCs, Macs, and mobile devices, and you get additional OneDrive storage. Office 365 is a subscription service. It provides you access to the Microsoft suite of programs for an annual fee. Not every Office 365 subscription offers the full Office suite, but they all include Microsoft Word. The term Office 365 is synonymous with the current release of Office. So the version of Word used with an Office 365 subscription is currently Word 2016. When a newer version of Word is released, Office 365 users update automatically. Obtaining Office 365 If you find that buying Word as an individual software package works for you, great! In a professional situation, or perhaps when you own a few gizmos and are tired of frequently buying each one a new copy of Word, then the Office 365 subscription is worthy. If you're curious about Office 365, visit office.com. You can download a free trial, read about options for mobile devices and the web, and gauge whether it's a worthy offer. The current annual price for a single Office 365 subscription is $70 for an individual. This license includes access to Word on the web as well as the installation of Office 365 on a PC and mobile device. Included with the basic ($70) Office 365 subscription is 1TB (terabyte) of OneDrive online storage. Your organization or school may offer you a complementary Office 365 subscription. This access includes a copy of Word that you can download, access to Word on the web, as well as specific online storage and other goodies. Checking your Office 365 subscription To confirm that you have a current Office 365 subscription, follow these steps in Word: Click the File tab. Choose Account from the items listed on the left side of the screen. If you have an Office 365 subscription, you see details similar to what's shown in the following figure. If you don't see your user information on the left side of the window, click the Sign In button to sign in to Office 365. To check on your account's status, confirm your renewal date, check credit card information, or perform other subscription tasks, click the Manage Account button on the Account screen. You're taken to a web page where you can sign in to your Office account and review various settings. One of the items you can perform on the Office website is to install Office 365 on another computer, such as your laptop or perhaps another system in a home office. You can also manage those installations, for example, removing an installation from your old laptop so that you can add it to your new laptop. If you start Word and it informs you that your Office 365 installation has become invalidated, follow the steps in this section and sign in again to reactivate the account.

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Run the Office Repair Utility to Fix Word 2016

Article / Updated 11-16-2016

Recognizing that "stuff" happens, Microsoft offers an Office Repair utility. Because Word 2016 is a part of the Office suite of programs, the Office Repair utility works to fix anything horrifically wrong with Word. Obey these steps: Close Word and any other Office programs. You should do so now; otherwise, you'll be asked to do so again later. Press the Win+X keyboard shortcut. In Windows 10, the Windows-and-X key combination brings up the super-secret shortcut menu in the lower left corner of the screen. If you're using Windows 7, just click on the Start button. Choose Control Panel. Below the Programs heading, click the Uninstall a Program link. Don't freak out: You're not uninstalling Word. The link should read "Uninstall or Change a Program," which is the title of the Control Panel screen you see next. Select Microsoft Office from the list of programs. The name may be subtly different, such as Microsoft Office 2016 or Microsoft Office 365. Click the Change button. The Office Repair utility runs, showing a screen similar to the one shown here. Choose Quick Repair. If this choice doesn't work, go back and choose Online Repair when you try again. Click the Repair button. Click the Repair button again to confirm. Wait. The Office Repair utility attempts to figure out what's wrong. What happens next depends on whether anything is fixed. If something needs attention, obey the directions on the screen. If everything is fine, you see the Done Repairing message (even if nothing was actually wrong). Click the Close button. If the repair didn't work, try again but choose Online Repair in Step 8. If that doesn't work, consider reinstalling your Office installation.

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