Office 2016 For Seniors For Dummies book cover

Office 2016 For Seniors For Dummies

By: Faithe Wempen Published: 10-09-2015

Office 2016 For Seniors For Dummies is the ideal resource for learning the fundamentals of the Microsoft Office suite. You'll explore the functionality of Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and Outlook, establishing basic knowledge that you can build upon as you continue to experiment with Office's applications. Larger font and image sizes mean you can easily read the contentand text that gets back to basics walks you through everything you need to know to use these programs in a variety of environments.

Articles From Office 2016 For Seniors For Dummies

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14 results
14 results
Common Shortcuts in Word, Excel, and PowerPoint 2016

Article / Updated 10-09-2018

By touching a couple of keys in combination, you can save time with simple tasks in Office 2016, such as copying text from one place and pasting it somewhere else. The keyboard shortcuts included here work equally well in Word, Excel, and PowerPoint 2016. Both mouse and keyboard methods are provided here. To do this With the mouse With the keyboard Open a file File→Open Ctrl+O Create a new file File→New Ctrl+N Print active document File→Print Ctrl+P Save your work (first time), or resave with same settings File→Save Ctrl+S Save your work with different name, location, or type File→Save As F12 Copy selection to Clipboard Home→ Copy Ctrl+C Cut selection to Clipboard Home→ Cut Ctrl+X Paste selection to Clipboard Home→ Paste Ctrl+V Open the Paste Special dialog box Home→Paste→Paste Special Ctrl+Shift+V Display shortcut menu for selected item Right-click item Shift+F10 Left-align a paragraph Home→ Left Align Ctrl+L Center a paragraph Home→ Center Ctrl+E Right-align a paragraph Home→ Right Align Ctrl+R Make text bold Home→ Bold Ctrl+B Make text italicized Home→ Italic Ctrl+I Make text underlined Home→Underline Ctrl+U Make text larger Home→Increase Font Size Ctrl+> Make text smaller Home→Decrease Font Size Ctrl+< Undo previous action Undo button on Quick Access toolbar Ctrl+Z Redo previous Undo Redo button on Quick Access toolbar Ctrl+Y Insert hyperlink Insert→Hyperlink Ctrl+K Get help Type in Tellme what you want to do box F1 Close the active file File→Close Ctrl+F4 Close the application Close button on application window Alt+F4 Check spelling Review→Spelling F7

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Word 2016 Text Entry and Formatting Shortcuts

Article / Updated 06-05-2016

Word 2016 offers you many ways to interact with your document. There are multiple keyboard shortcuts that can be a great time-saver. With these keyboard shortcuts, you can speed up text editing and formatting. To do this With the keyboard Start a new line in the same paragraph Shift+Enter Insert a page break Ctrl+Enter Insert a column break Ctrl+Shift+Enter Clear formatting Ctrl+spacebar Make text subscript Ctrl+= Make text superscript Ctrl+Shift++ Delete one character to the left Backspace Delete one word to the left Ctrl+Backspace Delete one character to the right Delete Delete one word to the right Ctrl+Delete

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Word 2016 View Shortcuts

Article / Updated 06-05-2016

Ever feel like you just don’t have the right perspective? Well, Word 2016 makes it easy to change your document view so that you can gain a different perspective. With these keyboard shortcuts, you can switch among various views in Word 2016. Switch to this view With the keyboard Print Layout Alt+Ctrl+P Outline Alt+Ctrl+O Draft Alt+Ctrl+N

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Printing Your Own Greeting Cards in Word 2016

Article / Updated 06-05-2016

Word 2016 isn’t a great desktop publishing program if you want unusual layouts like banners, greeting cards, and the like, but it will serve in a pinch. First of all, these instructions assume that you actually want to know how to set this up from scratch, and you don’t just want a quick card. If you just want a quick and easy card, choose File→New and search for a Greeting Card template. Quarter-fold means that the paper is folded in half twice. One side of the paper is completely ignored, because it’s folded inside. The other side is divided into four quadrants. The big challenge is to make the content on the upper half of the page upside-down and the content on the lower half normal. If the upside-down part is graphics only, with no text, this is easy enough. Just put the graphic in place and then use the Home→Rotate Objects→Rotate Right 90 command twice to turn it upside down. Or, if you want an upside-down mirror image of the original, use Home→Rotate Objects→Flip Vertical. If the upside-down part contains text, you’ll need to use a text box. Do the following: Choose Insert→Text Box→Draw Text Box and draw the text box where you want it on the page. Type the text in the text box. Rotate the text box 180 degrees, the same way as with a graphic: use the Home→Rotate Objects→Rotate Right 90 command twice. (Optional) If you don’t want the border around the text box, choose Drawing Tools Format→Shape Outline→No Outline.

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Excel 2016 Number Formatting Shortcuts

Article / Updated 06-05-2016

Many shortcuts are available that can save you time with simple tasks in Excel 2016, such as copying text from one place and pasting it somewhere else in your document. You can use these keyboard shortcuts instead of the Number drop-down list on the Home tab to apply number formatting to cells in Excel 2016. To apply this number format Use this key combination General Ctrl+Shift+~ Currency with two decimal places, negative numbers in parentheses Ctrl+Shift+$ Percentage, no decimal places Ctrl+Shift+% Scientific, two decimal places Ctrl+Shift+^ Date format with day, month, and year Ctrl+Shift+# Time format with hour and minute, AM or PM [email protected] Number format, two decimal places, thousands separator, minus sign for negative values Ctrl+Shift+!

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Word 2016 Symbol Shortcuts

Article / Updated 06-05-2016

Depending on how you choose to use Word 2016, you may find yourself faced with the need for a special symbol. With these keyboard shortcuts, you can insert common symbols in Word 2016. Use these keyboard shortcuts instead of the Insert→Symbol command to insert common typographical symbols. Symbol Shortcut Em dash Alt+Ctrl+minus sign En dash Ctrl+minus sign Copyright Alt+Ctrl+C Registered trademark Alt+Ctrl+R Trademark Alt+Ctrl+T Ellipsis Alt+Ctrl+period

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5 Great Tricks for PowerPoint 2016

Article / Updated 06-05-2016

There’s a lot to love about PowerPoint 2016, especially if you know how to use all of the bells and whistles. Here are some tips and tricks to keep in mind: Scale the slide size to the monitor dimensions There are two basic aspect ratios for computer screens: standard (4:3) and wide (16:9). These numbers are ratios. A standard size screen is 4 pixels wide for every 3 pixels high, and a widescreen is 16 for every 9. By default, PowerPoint creates new presentations in 16:9. However, if you open an older presentation that was created in PowerPoint 2010 or earlier, it may still be in 4:3. If the monitor on which you are showing the presentation doesn’t have the same ratio as the presentation, ugly black bars fill in the space on two sides. To change a presentation to a different ratio, choose Design→Slide Size and then select the desired ratio. Remove the background graphic from a design PowerPoint designs include some nice-looking background accent graphics. However, sometimes a background graphic gets in the way of readability, and it’s time to kick it to the curb. You can do this without changing designs. In Slide Master view, click the thumbnail at the top of the navigation pane to select the design itself, and not any particular layout. Then click the graphic on the slide. (It may appear as if the entire slide is selected at this point.) Press Delete to remove the graphic. Copy a background graphic between presentations You also can “borrow” the graphics from one design and use them in another design. In Slide Master view, click the thumbnail at the top of the navigation pane to select the design itself. Then click the graphic on the slide. Press Ctrl+C to copy it. Then open up the target presentation in Slide Master view, select the design at the top of the navigation pane, and press Ctrl+V to paste. Present online If you want to give a live presentation but not everyone can attend, try the Present Online feature. It uses a free Microsoft server to host your presentation. There’s no special setup required. You get a link that you can share with your audience so they can watch the show through their web browsers. To set it up, choose File→Share→Present Online→Present Online. A link will appear; copy that link and send it to your audience members via text message, email, or whatever method you like. Wait for them to get it, and then click the Start Presentation button in the dialog box that appears to get the show started. Link to a YouTube video in your presentation YouTube content in a presentation? It’s actually pretty easy to set up. If you don’t already have a link to a video you want, you can search for videos. Choose Insert→Video→Online Video. In the Insert Video dialog box, click in the Search YouTube box, type keywords and press Enter. Then click the video you want and click Insert. If you already have a certain video in mind, view its page at YouTube in your web browser. Select the video’s code in the URL (the numbers after the = sign) and copy it to the Clipboard with Ctrl+C. For example, if the URL is https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ql5fvsnUsWU, copy just ql5fvsnUsWU. Then, in PowerPoint, Insert→Video→Online Video. In the dialog box, click in the Search YouTube box and press Ctrl+V to paste, and then press Enter. Voilà! — your desired video appears as the only item in the search results. Select it and click Insert. If you have an embed code for the video (that is, a code string that tells a web page to embed the video), you can enter it in the Insert Video dialog box in the Paste Embed Code Here text box, rather than going through all the preceding rigmarole.

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Organizing Your Mail in Outlook 2016

Article / Updated 06-05-2016

Mail box bloat. Everyone gets it over time. Your Outlook 2016 Inbox fills up with messages that you neglected to delete or file away, and before you know it you’ve got thousands of messages, taking up space in your data file and preventing you from browsing the new stuff easily. Here are some ideas for breaking up that clog. Clean up conversations A conversation is an email exchange that consists of multiple back-and-forth messages. Because most people just hit Reply to continue a conversation without deleting all previous text, you end up with lots of messages that are basically subsets of one another’s content. The Conversation Clean Up feature goes through and finds these, deleting any messages that are completely contained within at least one other message. Choose Home→Clean Up→Clean Up Conversation to use this feature on a particular message. (Select the message first.) To clean up an entire folder, choose Home→Clean Up→Clean Up Folder. Or, to do it for all your mail folders, select the Inbox and then choose Home→Clean Up→Clean Up Folder & Subfolders. Archive old messages You can set Outlook to archive messages that have specific properties, such as those that are older than a certain date. Archiving messages moves them to a separate datafile called Archive.pst. Clearing out your main Outlook file makes it smaller, so that Outlook starts more quickly. You can open the Archive data file any time you need to refer back to something in it. To archive messages, choose File→Info→Mailbox Cleanup→Archive. Set your preferences in the Archive dialog box and click OK. To open the Archive data file later to retrieve something, choose File→Open & Export→Open Outlook Data File. Browse to the archive file, select it, and click OK. The archive file now appears in the navigation pane at the left; you can work with it there just as you would your main file. For even more thorough cleanup, choose File→Info→Mailbox Cleanup→Mailbox Cleanup. In the Mailbox Cleanup dialog box, you can specify parameters for automatically archiving. For example, you can find items older than a certain number of days or larger than a certain number of kilobytes. Create mail folders One effective way to organize your mail is to create subfolders for your Inbox. Then you can move messages into one of the subfolders to get it out of the main Inbox. For example, you could have a subfolder for each organization you volunteer for, or a subfolder for each family member who sends you messages. To create a new folder, right-click the Inbox folder in the navigation pane and choose New Folder. Type the new folder name and press Enter. Then drag-and-drop messages from your Inbox onto the new folder’s name in the navigation pane. Creating mail-handling rules Having multiple mail folders is great, but you have to remember to drag-and-drop messages into those folders. Fortunately you can automate the process by creating mail-handling rules. A rule might evaluate the sender’s email address and redirect the message to a subfolder if it is from a certain person, for example. To create a mail handling rule, start with a message selected that meets the desired criteria. Then choose Home→Rules→Create Rule. Then fill out the dialog box to describe the message that you want to target. For example, you can specify what the subject contains or who it is sent to. Click Advanced Options for more choices. To set it up, choose File→Share→Present Online→Present Online. A link will appear; copy that link and send it to your audience members via text message, email, or whatever method you like. Wait for them to get it, and then click the Start Presentation button in the dialog box that appears to get the show started.

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Excel 2016 Entry and Formatting Shortcuts

Article / Updated 06-05-2016

Excel 2016 offers you many tools to save time with everyday tasks. With these keyboard shortcuts, you can enter and modify data in Excel 2016. These keyboard shortcuts can save you time when entering and formatting data in Excel. To do this Use the key combination Enter the current time Ctrl+Shift+: Enter the current date Ctrl+; Apply an outline border Ctrl+Shift+& Remove an outline border Ctrl+Shift+_ Display or hide formulas in cells Ctrl+` Display Format Cells dialog box Ctrl+1 Hides selected rows Ctrl+9 Hides selected columns Ctrl+0

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Working with IF Functions in Excel 2016

Article / Updated 06-05-2016

Excel’s IF function intimidates a lot of people, but it’s really not that conceptually difficult. The IF function determines whether a statement is true or false, and then takes one of two actions depending on the answer. Let’s look at a plain-English example. Suppose that when the sum of C2 and D2 is greater than 100, you want to display in E2 the result of multiplying the sum of C2 and D2 by 0.05. On the other hand, when C2+D2 is not greater than 100, E2 should show 0. The syntax for the IF function is: =IF(condition,value_if_true,value_if_false) So first let’s write the condition: C2+D2>100 If the condition is true we want to do this math for the value_if_true : (C2+D2)*0.05 Notice that there are parentheses around the addition operation. Without these parentheses, it wouldn’t be done first; in the order of operations, multiplication comes before addition. The third part of the function, the value_if_false, is 0. Filling these values into the function, it looks like this: =IF(C2+D2>100,(C2+D2)*0.05,0) If you have more than two possible conditions, and you want something different for each condition, you can nest one IF function inside another. You can handle two of the conditions in the inner IF, and then apply the third condition in the outer IF. Here’s an example to work through. Suppose that we want to display some text according to the value of C2+D2. When C2+D2 is greater than 100, we want to show the text “Good” and when C2+D2 is greater than 50 but less than 100, we want to show the text “Fair”. When neither of those conditions is true, we want to show the text “Poor”. We start by evaluating the first condition as the value_if_true: =IF(C2+D2>100,”Good”) The value_if_false will be another IF statement: =IF(C2+D2>50,”Fair”,”Poor”) Putting them together — you omit the = sign for the nested function — looks like this: =IF(C2+D2>100,”Good”,IF(C2+D2>50,”Fair”,”Poor”)) Notice the three closing parentheses at the end, one for each IF. Now that you know how IF functions work, you can string together as many levels of nesting as you need to get the job done.

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