Managing Depression with Mindfulness For Dummies book cover

Managing Depression with Mindfulness For Dummies

By: Robert Gebka Published: 03-21-2016

Rise above depression and build a positive future using mindfulness

If you suffer from depression, you know that it′s not something you can simply snap yourself out of. Depression is a potentially debilitating condition that must be treated and managed with care, but not knowing where to turn for help can make an already difficult time feel even more harrowing. Thankfully, Managing Depression with Mindfulness For Dummies offers authoritative and sensitive guidance on using evidence based and NHS approved Mindfulness Based Interventions similar to Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) to help empower you to rise above depression and discover a renewed sense of emotional wellbeing and happiness. The book offers cutting edge self-management mindfulness techniques which will help you make sense of your condition and teach you how to relate differently to negative thought patterns which so often contribute to low mood and depression.

The World Health Organization predicts that more people will be affected by depression than any other health problem by the year 2030. While the statistics are staggering, they offer a small glimmer of hope: you aren′t alone. As we continue to learn more about how depression works and how it can be treated, the practice of mindfulness proves to be an effective tool for alleviating stress, anxiety, depression, low self–esteem, and insomnia. With the tips and guidance offered inside, you′ll learn how to apply the practice of mindfulness
to ease your symptoms of depression and get your life back.

    • Heal and recover from depression mindfully
    • Understand the relationship between thinking, feeling, mood, and depression
    • Reduce your depression with effective mindfulness practices
    • Implement positive changes and prevent relapse

Whether you are struggling with low mood or simply wish to learn mindfulness as a way of enriching your life, Managing Depression with Mindfulness For Dummies serves as a beacon of light and hope on your journey to rediscovering your sense of wellbeing, joy and happiness.

Articles From Managing Depression with Mindfulness For Dummies

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7 results
Managing Depression with Mindfulness For Dummies Cheat Sheet

Cheat Sheet / Updated 03-27-2016

Mindfulness has been scientifically proven to help you reduce stress, anxiety and depression. It can also empower you to connect with a greater sense of happiness and wellbeing. The journey to healing from depression can be a long one, but with support and help you will regain your sense of balance and emotional stability.

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Healing Depression with Mindfulness Is Possible – But It Takes Time

Article / Updated 03-26-2016

With the right support, recovery from depression with mindfulness is possible. It is useful to remember that any healing through depression takes time and is often met with an up and down process of lows, highs, stable periods, lows again, then more stable times leading to another improvement and feeling better. As much as you may want it to, wellbeing often does not happen overnight. It is normal to want to speed things up or to worry that you will never feel better. The thing to remember is that with time and the right support your symptoms will improve, and you will feel better. Very often people do not notice any improvement, mainly because you can’t see how far up the line of recovery you have actually travelled. It’s human nature not to notice positive changes. Also it is possible that each time you feel low on your journey to recovery you mistake it for failure rather than an opportunity to reflect and learn from the experience.

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Working towards a Definition of Mindfulness for Depression

Article / Updated 03-26-2016

A few definitions exist of what of mindfulness is. However, understand that the theoretical definitions of mindfulness and the experience of mindfulness are two different things. Understanding the basic theory behind mindfulness can be very helpful, though, and is the first step towards actually experiencing it. Mindfulness is an experience of being in a certain state of awareness and being. This can only be fully understood by doing the practice. This way of looking at things can be very helpful as it will prevent you from having to try too hard at ‘getting’ what mindfulness is. You cannot ‘get’ mindfulness, but you can experience it. Mindfulness has its origins within the reflective Buddhist tradition dating back to 2,500 years ago in India and can be described as moment-to-moment awareness. The Chinese character for mindfulness is composed of two single sections: the top part is the word ‘now’ or ‘present’ and the second is the character for the word heart or mind. It’s interesting that the Chinese word for the heart and mind are the same. In the Asian culture and language mindfulness is seen more as the mind or heart that is resting in the present moment.

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10 Tips for Finding the Motivation to Manage Your Depression with Mindfulness

Article / Updated 03-26-2016

Here are ten tips that are simple to follow to manage your depression with mindfulness and can act as effective reminders in a similar way that inspirational quotes do. These ten tips can help lift your mood and can potentially help you feel a little bit better about your own situation. Acknowledge that you are already doing it! Acknowledging something good and meaningful about yourself during depression hardly ever comes naturally. Having said that whether you feel you can acknowledge that you are actually already taking an active part in your recovery or not, the fact is you have reached out for help. This way of looking at things can be very helpful as it makes it possible for you to understand that not only are you now on an evolving journey of potentially recovering from depression, but also that you can take further steps forwards in a way that is meaningful and personal to you. Recognise that only you can find something that will motivate and support you. When it comes to finding a way through depression finding something to hold on to can be immensely helpful. Look for some idea or reason that will support your motivation to keep encouraging yourself in not only surviving depression but also in finding a way through it. For some people children and family can be the main motivation factor, for others the wish to be independent and healthy, still for other people the motivation can be one of simply not wanting to feel depressed anymore. Whatever it is for you, take your time to discover this and make it your own. Risk trying again – but in a different way. It’s quite possible that you have tried many different ways and methods to get rid of your depression and perhaps feel that no matter how hard you’ve tried, you just were not able to let go of it and be happy. This is totally understandable and ok and is part of being depressed. Having said this, if you wish to potentially feel better you have to be willing to let go of your old ways of trying to get rid of depression and consider another more effective method. Rather than using willpower or unhelpful coping strategies that you know from experience do not work, begin to take stock of those strategies that do work or have worked and do more of that. This will support you to learn to live well and compassionately with depression rather than exhausting your efforts in trying to get rid of it. Remind yourself that you don’t need to get rid of difficult feelings. Depression is a complex condition, and with that you can often feel like you have irreconcilable emotions that just won’t go away. Begin to develop an attitude of tolerance, acceptance and self-compassion despite having these feelings. In other words, you can begin to resist the need to fight them off and remind yourself that you can develop this capacity to feel whole and stable despite the inner conflicts. Share your situation with someone you trust. Sharing your difficulty with another person can potentially bring in some freshness and perspective in your life. Depression can often cause severe isolation and can make you feel cut off from others, feeling like you are an outsider who just doesn’t belong. As a result you can end up suffering in silence and struggle deeply with our life on your own. Part of healing through depression means reaching out for support to someone you trust. Remember, you don’t have to do it alone. Think of things you could do if you felt a little better. When your mood is low and you experience emotional pain for a continued period of time, your brain forgets what it feels like to experience enjoyment. This is partly because the parts of the brain that get activated during depression are almost the same as when you experience prolonged physical pain. One way to help regain your motivation to get better is to purposefully remind yourself of the things you used to enjoy. Recalling experiences that brought you enjoyment in the past can potentially trigger the part of the brain responsible for experiencing pleasure. Find a role model who came through it. Finding someone else in similar shoes could help you begin to recognise that perhaps with the right support you too can begin to heal through depression and recover your sense of wellbeing just like they did. Knowing that someone else is living well with depression makes it more attainable and brings the light of possibility closer to you. Watch inspirational or comedy films. Doing this can potentially lift your mood slightly. When your mood is lighter you feel better and feel naturally more motivated to do things you enjoy. Find motivation by being grateful for the good things in your life. Gratitude is probably the last thing you might want to reflect on when you feel down and under. However, some research suggests that keeping a gratitude diary once a week can raise your mood levels and potentially ease the symptoms of mild low mood. Continue reading books on how to get better. Becoming curious about subjects related to wellbeing can potentially inspire you to stay engaged in your own healing process. Reading books can also provide the opportunity to learn about other positive ways of working with depression. It can provide a fresh perspective on your situation and might help open some doors in terms of what other methods and disciplines can be of value to you.

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Mindfulness for Modern Living

Article / Updated 03-26-2016

Mindfulness is a lifetime engagement. The purpose of mindfulness isn’t to get somewhere else, but to be where and as you actually are in this very moment, whether the experience is pleasant, unpleasant or neutral. You might find it interesting to know that mindfulness is evidence-based cognitive training which originated more than 2,500 years ago in India and has been approved by the NHS (UK’s government National Health Service). It’s fascinating that this ancient method which has its roots within the Buddhist reflective tradition is now infiltrating modern medicine and society benefiting millions of people. As you engage in mindfulness meditation your life will unfold and change a lot – and so will your mind, your heart and your views. Mindfulness can support you in the process of stepping into a fuller, more joyful way of being. It has the potential to reduce stress and depression, enhance your emotional intelligence, improve your overall quality of physical and mental wellbeing, and is useful for people of all backgrounds, ages, interests and levels of wellbeing. You don’t have to have any difficulties in order to practice mindfulness. Mindfulness is practiced by millions of people who simply wish to enhance their creativity, sense of wellbeing and self-compassion. It is used in business to enhance productivity as well as in schools to helps kids with their journey of learning. You can benefit from learning mindfulness if you are interested in any of the following: Reducing stress levels, anxiety, depression and physical pain Creating more head space, free from negative chattering thoughts Enhancing your sense of psychological and physical wellbeing Enhancing your creativity and emotional intelligence Learning to live life in the present moment away from past negative habitual responses Reducing self-judgement and enhancing a sense of self-appreciation and self-compassion Enhancing your sense of resilience, creativity and performance

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Managing Depression with Mindfulness: You Are Not Alone – 1 in 4 Have Depression

Article / Updated 03-26-2016

When you’re depressed you may feel like you are the only one who has the problem and that everyone else is happy and normal. This kind of feeling, although very normal, can cause you to feel extremely isolated and causes you to suffer in silence. The truth is that many people who look happy are in fact also depressed and chronically unhappy. There are more of us than you might think. The World Health Organization predicts that more people will be affected by depression than any other health problem by the year 2030. It is no surprise then that about one in four people suffers from some kind of mental health difficulty, such as depression. You might find it interesting that many famous people have suffered from depression as well. This just shows that depression is more common than you might think. Following are a few names of famous people who suffered from depression at one point in their lives. You might recognise some of them: Stephen John Fry, English actor, presenter, and activist Eric Clapton, English musician Bob Dylan, American singer-songwriter, poet and artist Ruby Wax, American comedienne Robbie Williams, British pop singer Sir Winston Churchill, British Prime Minister J.K. Rowling, British writer Looking at it this way can sometimes help you feel a little bit better about your situation, knowing that you are not alone in with your problem.

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Scientific Evidence for Using Mindfulness for Depression

Article / Updated 03-26-2016

Mindfulness is now an evidence-based technique used widely for depression by the NHS (the UK’s free public National Health Service). It is also endorsed by NICE or the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence as an approved therapy for the prevention of relapse of depression. There are numerous clinical studies which demonstrate the effectiveness of using mindfulness for people suffering from anxiety and depression. Following is an outline of just a few of such scientific studies: Mindfulness practices have been shown to significantly reduce anxiety and depression, both in the general population and in a variety of health conditions, including cancer, chronic pain, major depression, bipolar and anxiety disorders. Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) is significantly more effective than antidepressants alone in preventing relapse from depression (patients with a minimum of three episodes. Studies have found long-term changes in the brains of experienced meditators and those undergoing mindfulness meditation training. An 8-week Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) course results in actual physical changes in the brains of meditation novices. These manifest as increases in grey matter (brain cell bodies) concentrations in brain regions involved in executive reasoning (frontal cortex), learning and memory (hippocampus as above), emotion regulation, self-referential processing and perspective.

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