Chemistry Workbook For Dummies with Online Practice book cover

Chemistry Workbook For Dummies with Online Practice

Published: April 17, 2017

Overview

Take the confusion out of chemistry with hundreds of practice problems

Chemistry Workbook For Dummies is your ultimate companion for introductory chemistry at the high school or college level. Packed with hundreds of practice problems, this workbook gives you the practice you need to internalize the essential concepts that form the foundations of chemistry. From matter and molecules to moles and measurements, these problems cover the full spectrum of topics you'll see in class—and each section includes key concept review and full explanations for every problem to quickly get you on the right track. This new third edition includes access to an online test bank, where you'll find bonus chapter quizzes to help you test your understanding and pinpoint areas in need of review. Whether you're preparing for an exam or seeking a start-to-finish study aid, this workbook is your ticket to acing basic chemistry.

Chemistry problems can look intimidating; it's a whole new language, with different rules, new symbols, and complex concepts. The good news is that practice makes perfect, and this book provides plenty of it—with easy-to-understand coaching every step of the way.

  • Delve deep into the parts of the periodic table
  • Get comfortable with units, scientific notation, and chemical equations
  • Work with states, phases, energy, and charges
  • Master nomenclature, acids, bases, titrations, redox reactions, and more

Understanding introductory chemistry is critical for your success in all science classes to follow; keeping up with the material now makes life much easier down the education road. Chemistry Workbook For Dummies gives you the practice you need to succeed!

Take the confusion out of chemistry with hundreds of practice problems

Chemistry Workbook For Dummies is your ultimate companion for introductory chemistry at the high school or college level. Packed with hundreds of practice problems, this workbook gives you the practice you need to internalize the essential concepts that form the foundations of chemistry. From matter and molecules to moles and measurements, these problems cover the full spectrum of topics you'll see in class—and each section includes key concept review and full explanations for every problem to quickly get you on the right track. This new third edition includes access to an online test bank, where you'll find bonus chapter quizzes to help you test your understanding and pinpoint areas in need of review. Whether you're preparing for an exam or seeking a start-to-finish study aid, this

workbook is your ticket to acing basic chemistry.

Chemistry problems can look intimidating; it's a whole new language, with different rules, new symbols, and complex concepts. The good news is that practice makes perfect, and this book provides plenty of it—with easy-to-understand coaching every step of the way.

  • Delve deep into the parts of the periodic table
  • Get comfortable with units, scientific notation, and chemical equations
  • Work with states, phases, energy, and charges
  • Master nomenclature, acids, bases, titrations, redox reactions, and more

Understanding introductory chemistry is critical for your success in all science classes to follow; keeping up with the material now makes life much easier down the education road. Chemistry Workbook For Dummies gives you the practice you need to succeed!

Chemistry Workbook For Dummies Cheat Sheet

Getting through a chemistry class involves a range of science skills and procedures. You use exponential and scientific notation, analyze atomic structures, name compounds, convert to and from moles, and draw Lewis dot structures. Is there anything you don't do in chemistry?

Articles From The Book

19 results

Chemistry Articles

How to Convert between Units Using Conversion Factors

A conversion factor uses your knowledge of the relationships between units to convert from one unit to another. For example, if you know that there are 2.54 centimeters in every inch (or 2.2 pounds in every kilogram or 101.3 kilopascals in every atmosphere), then converting between those units becomes simple algebra. It is important to know some common conversions of temperature, size, and pressure as well as metric prefixes.

Conversion factor table

The following table includes some useful conversion factors.

Using conversion factors example

The following example shows how to use a basic conversion factor to fix non-SI units. Dr. Geekmajor absentmindedly measures the mass of a sample to be 0.75 lb and records his measurement in his lab notebook. His astute lab assistant, who wants to save the doctor some embarrassment, knows that there are 2.2 lbs in every kilogram. The assistant quickly converts the doctor’s measurement to SI units. What does she get? The answer is 0.34 kg. Let’s try another example. A chemistry student, daydreaming during lab, suddenly looks down to find that he’s measured the volume of his sample to be 1.5 cubic inches. What does he get when he converts this quantity to cubic centimeters? The answer is 25 cm3. Rookie chemists often mistakenly assume that if there are 2.54 centimeters in every inch, then there are 2.54 cubic centimeters in every cubic inch. No! Although this assumption seems logical at first glance, it leads to catastrophically wrong answers. Remember that cubic units are units of volume and that the formula for volume is Imagine 1 cubic inch as a cube with 1-inch sides. The cube’s volume is Now consider the dimensions of the cube in centimeters: Calculate the volume using these measurements, and you get This volume is much greater than 2.54 cm3! To convert units of area or volume using length measurements, square or cube everything in your conversion factor, not just the units, and everything works out just fine.

Chemistry Articles

How to Add and Subtract with Exponential Notation

In chemistry, you can add and subtract extreme numbers by using exponential notation, and expressing your numbers as coefficients of identical powers of 10. To wrestle your numbers into this form, you may need to use coefficients less than 1 or greater than 10.

Adding with exponential notation

To add two numbers by using exponential notation, you begin by expressing each number as a coefficient and a power of 10. In this example, you add these numbers, by following these steps:
  1. Convert both numbers to the same power of 10.
  2. Add the coefficients.
  3. Join your new coefficient to the shared power of 10.

Subtracting with exponential notation

To subtract numbers in exponential notation, you follow the same steps but subtract the coefficients. Here’s an example:

0.0743 – 0.0022

To perform the subtraction, follow these steps:
  1. Convert both numbers to the same power of 10.
  2. Subtract the coefficients. 7.43 – 0.22 = 7.21
  3. Join your new coefficient to the shared power of 10.
Now try a few practice questions.

Practice questions

  1. Add the following:
  2. Use exponential notation to subtract the following: 9,352 – 431

Answers and Explanations

  1. The correct answer is Because the numbers are each already expressed with identical powers of 10 (in this case, 10–6), you can simply add the coefficients: 398 + 147 = 545 Then join the new coefficient with the original power of 10.
  2. The correct answer is (or an equivalent expression). First, convert the numbers so each uses the same power of 10: Here, you’ve picked 10², but any power is fine as long as the two numbers have the same power. Then subtract the coefficients: 93.52 – 4.31 = 89.21 Finally, join the new coefficient with the shared power of 10.

Chemistry Articles

Examining Equivalents and Normality

In the world of chemistry, not all acids and bases are created equally. Some have an innate ability to neutralize more effectively than others. Consider hydrochloric acid (HCl) and sulfuric acid (H2SO4), for example. If you mixed 1 M sodium hydroxide (NaOH) together with 1 M hydrochloric acid, you'd need to add equal amounts of each to create a neutral solution of sodium chloride (NaCl) and water (H2O). If you mixed sodium hydroxide with sulfuric acid, however, you'd need to add twice as much sodium hydroxide as sulfuric acid to create a solution of sodium sulfate (Na2SO4) and water. Why this blatant inequality of acids? The answer lies in the balanced neutralization reactions for both acid/base pairs: HCl + NaOH → NaCl + H2O H2SO4 + 2NaOH → Na2SO4 + 2H2O The coefficients in the balanced equations are the key to understanding this inequality. To balance the second equation, the coefficient 2 needs to be added to sodium hydroxide, indicating that 2 mol of it must be present to neutralize 1 mol of sulfuric acid. On a molecular level, this happens because sulfuric acid has two acidic hydrogen atoms to give up, and the single hydroxide in a molecule of sodium hydroxide can neutralize only one of those two acidic hydrogens to form water. Therefore, 2 mol of sodium hydroxide are needed for every 1 mol of sulfuric acid. Hydrochloric acid, on the other hand, has only one acidic hydrogen to contribute, so it can be neutralized by an equal amount of sodium hydroxide, which has only one hydroxide to contribute to neutralization. The number of moles of an acid or base multiplied by the number of hydrogens or hydroxides that a molecule has to contribute in a neutralization reaction is called the number of equivalents of that substance. Basically, the number of effective neutralizing moles available determines the ratio of acid to base in a neutralization reaction. In the hydrochloric acid example, there's 1 equivalent of acid (from HCl) present and 1 equivalent of hydroxide (from NaOH) present. In the second example, there are 2 equivalents of acid (from H2SO4) and 2 equivalents of hydroxide present (from NaOH and the coefficient of 2). In chemistry life, this idea can come in quite handy when you want to neutralize an acid or base for disposal or cleanup. In addition to dealing with the more common concept of molarity, you may encounter a concentration measure called normality, which is simply the number of equivalents divided by the volume in liters: As you can see from the formula, molarity and normality are very similar. Normality, however, takes equivalents into account. Mixing equal amounts of acidic and basic solutions of equal normality always results in a neutral solution, while the same can't be said of solutions of equal molarity.