Word 2019 For Dummies book cover

Word 2019 For Dummies

By: Dan Gookin Published: 10-23-2018

The bestselling beginner’s guide to Microsoft Word 

Whether you've used older versions of this popular program or have never processed a single word, this hands-on guide gets you going with the latest version of Microsoft Word. In no time, you'll begin editing, formatting, proofing, and dressing up your Word documents like a pro.  

In this leading book about the world’s number one word processing application, Dan Gookin talks about using Microsoft Word in friendly, easy-to-follow terms. Focusing on the needs of the beginning Word user, it provides everything you need to know about Word—without any painful jargon.

  • Covers the new and improved features found in the latest version of Word
  • Create your own templates
  • Explains why you can’t always trust the spell checker
  • Offers little-known keyboard shortcuts

If you’re new to Word and want to spend more time on your actual work rather than figuring out how to make it work for you, this new edition of Word X For Dummies has you covered.

Articles From Word 2019 For Dummies

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21 results
21 results
How to Add Graphics to Word 2019 Documents

Article / Updated 01-08-2019

The door to Word’s graphical closet is found on the Insert tab. The command buttons nestled in the Illustrations group place various graphical goobers into the text. Here’s how the process works for pictures and graphical images: Click the mouse at the spot in the text where you desire the image to appear. You don’t need to be precise, because you can always move the image later. Click the Insert tab. Use one of the command buttons to choose which type of image to add. You can also paste a previously copied image. The figure illustrates how a freshly added image looks, highlighting some of its features. While the image is selected, a new tab appears on the Ribbon. For pictures, it’s the Picture Tools Format tab; for other types of graphics, the Drawing Tools Format tab appears. Both tabs offer tools to help you perfect the recently inserted graphic. Beyond pictures and images, shapes are drawn on the page. In this case, they appear in front of or behind the text. To remove an image, click to select it and then tap the Delete key. If the graphical object, such as a shape, contains text, ensure that you’ve clicked the object’s border before you tap the Delete key. The more graphics you add in Word, the more sluggish it becomes. My advice: Write first. Add graphics last. Save often. How to copy and paste an image in Word 2019 A simple way to stick an image into a document is to paste it in from elsewhere. Follow these steps: Select the image in another program or from the web. Press Ctrl+C to copy the image. For a web page image, right-click and choose the Copy or Copy Image command. Switch to the Word document window. In Windows, press the Alt+Tab keyboard shortcut to deftly switch program windows. In Word, position the insertion pointer where you want the image to dwell. Press Ctrl+V to paste the image into the document. If the image doesn’t paste, it might be in a graphical format incompatible with Word. You can also obtain an image from the web directly, by performing a web image search from within Word: On the Insert tab, in the Illustrations group, click the Online Pictures button. Use options in the Insert Pictures window to locate an online image, courtesy of Microsoft’s Bing search engine. How to plop down a picture in Word Your computer is most likely littered with picture files. No matter how the image was created, as long as it’s found somewhere on your PC, you can stick it into your document. Follow these steps: Click the mouse in the text where you want the image to appear. Click the Insert tab; in the Illustrations group, click the Pictures button. After clicking the Pictures button, the Insert Picture dialog box appears. Locate the image file on your PC’s storage system. Click to select the image. Click the Insert button. The image is slapped down in the document. A nifty picture to stick at the end of a letter is your signature. Use a desktop scanner to digitize your John Hancock. Save the signature as an image file on your computer, and then follow the steps in this section to insert that signature picture in the proper place in the document. Refer to the book Word 2016 For Professionals For Dummies (Wiley) for details on adding a caption to an image and creating a list of captions for the manuscript. How to slap down a shape in Word Word comes with a library of common shapes ready to insert in a document. These include basic shapes, such as squares, circles, geometric figures, lines, and arrows — plus popular symbols. Graphics professionals refer to these types of images as line art. To place some line art in a document, follow these steps: Click the Insert tab. In the Illustrations group, click the Shapes button. The button holds a menu that lists shapes organized by type. Choose a predefined shape. The mouse pointer changes to a plus sign (+). Drag to create the shape. The shape is placed into the document, floating in front of the text. At this point, you can adjust the shape: Change its size, location, or colors. Use the Drawing Tools Format tab, conveniently shown on the Ribbon while the shape is selected, to affect those changes. Instantly change the image by using the Shape Styles group on the Ribbon’s Drawing Tools Format tab. Choose a new style from the Shape Gallery. Styles are related to the document’s theme. Other items in the Shape Styles group affect the selected shape specifically: Click the Shape Fill button to set the fill color; use the Shape Outline button to set the shape’s outline color; choose an outline thickness from the Shape Outline button’s menu, on the Weight submenu; use the Shape Effects button to apply 3D effects, shadows, and other fancy formatting to the shape. To more effectively format a shape, click the Launcher in the lower right corner of the Shape Styles group. Use the Format Shape pane to manipulate settings for any selected shape in the document. How to stick things into shapes in Word Shapes need not be clunky, colorful distractions. You can use a shape to hold text or a picture, which makes them one of the more flexible graphical goobers to add to a document. To slip a smidgen of text into a shape, right-click the shape and choose the Add Text command. The insertion pointer appears within the shape. Type and format the text. To place a picture into a shape, select the shape. Click the Drawing Tools Format tab. Click the Shape Fill button and choose the Picture menu item. Use the Insert Pictures window to hunt down an image to frame inside the shape. Yes, it’s possible to have both a picture and text inside a shape. To further deal with text in a shape, click the shape and then click the Drawing Tools Format tab on the Ribbon. The Text group contains buttons to manipulate the shape’s text. To remove text from a shape, select and delete the text. To remove a picture, select a solid color from the Shape Fill menu. How to use WordArt Perhaps the most overused graphic that’s stuck into any Word document is WordArt. This feature is almost too popular. If you haven’t used it yourself, you’ve probably seen it in a thousand documents, fliers, and international treaties. Here’s how it works: Click the Insert tab. In the Text group, click the WordArt button to display the WordArt menu. word2019-wordart Choose a style from the WordArt gallery. A WordArt graphic placeholder appears in the document. Type the (short and sweet) text that you want WordArt-ified. Use the Word Art Styles group on the Drawing Tools Format tab to customize WordArt’s appearance. If you don’t see the Drawing Tools Format tab, first click the WordArt graphic.

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How to Add Date and Time Information to Word 2019 Documents

Article / Updated 01-08-2019

With few exceptions, time travelers are the only ones who bother asking for the current year. Otherwise, people merely want to know the month and day or just the day of the week. Word understands those people (but not time travelers), so it offers a slate of tools and tricks to insert date-and-time information into a document. How to add the current date or time to Word documents Rather than look at a calendar and type a date, follow these steps: Click the Insert tab. In the Text group, click the Date and Time button. The button may say Date & Time, or you may see only the icon. word2019-date-time Use the Date and Time dialog box to choose a format. If desired, click the Update Automatically option so that the date-and-time text remains current with the document. Setting the Update Automatically ensures that the date and time values are updated when you open or print the document. Click the OK button to insert the current date or time into the document. The keyboard shortcut to insert the current date is Alt+Shift+D. To insert the current time, press Alt+Shift+T. How to use Word's PrintDate field The date field I use most often is PrintDate. This field reflects the current date (and time, if you like) when a document prints. It’s marvelous for including in a letterhead template or in another document you print frequently. Here’s how it works: Click the Insert tab. In the Text group, click Quick Parts →Field. The Field dialog bo, appears. Select Date and Time from the Categories drop-down list. Select PrintDate from the Field Names list. Choose a date-and-time format from the Field Properties area. Click OK. The field looks odd until you print the document, which makes sense. Also, the field reflects the last day you printed the document. It’s updated when you print again.

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Use Fields in Word 2019 to Add Dynamic Elements

Article / Updated 01-08-2019

Word lets you add dynamic elements to a document. Unlike the text you normally compose, dynamic text changes to reflect a number of factors. To add these dynamic elements to a document, you use a Word feature called fields. Word's dynamic field feature Word’s dynamic field feature is part of the Quick Parts tools. To add a field to a document, click the Insert tab and in the Text group and click the Quick Parts button. Choose the Field command to behold the Field dialog box, shown here. The scrolling list on the left side of the Field dialog box shows categories. These represent various dynamic nuggets you can insert in a document. Choose a specific category to narrow the list of Field Names. The center and right part of the dialog box contain formats, options, and other details for a selected field. To insert the field, click the OK button. The field appears just like other text, complete with formatting and such, but the information displayed changes to reflect whatever the field represents. For example, a page number field always shows the current page. When the insertion pointer is placed inside a field, the text is highlighted with a dark gray background. It’s your clue that the text is a field and not plain text. How to add useful fields Word offers an abundance of fields you can thrust into a document. Of the lot, you might use only a smattering. These subsections assume that the Fields dialog box is open. Page numbers To ensure that the document accurately reflects the current page number, insert a current page number field: In the Field dialog box, select Numbering from the Categories drop-down list. Select Page from the Field Names list. In the Field Properties section of the Field dialog box, select a format for the page number. Click OK. The current page number appears in the document. No matter how you edit or modify the document, that number reflects the current page number. Total number of pages To insert the total number of pages in a document, heed these directions: Select Document Information from the Categories drop-down list. Select NumPages from the Field Names list. Select a format. Click OK. Word count Getting paid by the word? Stick an automatic word count at the end of the document: From the Categories list, select Document Information. Select NumWords from the Field Names list. Click OK. Document filename Many organizations place the document’s filename into a document header or footer. Rather than guess, why not use a field that contains the document’s exact name? Do this: From the Categories list, select Document Information. Select FileName from the Field Names list. In the field properties list, choose a text case format. Optionally (though recommended), put a check mark by the option Add Path to Filename. Click OK. The FileName field always reflects the name of the file, even when you change it. How to update a field Not every field updates automatically, like the page number fields. For some fields, you must perform a manual update to keep the content fresh. To do so, right-click the field and choose the Update Field command. The field’s text is refreshed. Printing fields update when you print the document. They don’t need to be manually updated. How to change a field When you don’t get the field’s text quite right — for example, you desire a date format that displays the weekday name instead of an abbreviation — right-click the field and choose the Edit Field command. Use the Field dialog box to make whatever modifications you deem necessary. How to view a field’s raw data Just as those mutants at the end of Beneath the Planet of the Apes removed their human masks, you can remove a field's mask by right-clicking it and choosing the Toggle Field Codes command. For example, the FileSize field looks like this: { FILESIZE \* MERGEFORMAT } To restore the field to human-readable form, right-click it again and choose the Toggle Field Codes command. The keyboard shortcut is Alt+F9. All praise be to the bomb. How to delete fields Removing a field works almost like deleting text. Almost. The main difference is that you must press the Delete or Backspace key twice. For example, when you press Backspace to erase a field, the entire field is highlighted. It’s your clue that you're about to erase a field, not regular text. Press Backspace again to remove the field.

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How to Use Word 2019's Master Document Feature

Article / Updated 01-08-2019

The first novel I wrote (and never published, of course) was several hundred pages long. It was saved as a single document. Word documents can be any length, but putting everything into one document can be impractical. Editing, copying and pasting, searching and replacing, and all other word processing operations become less efficient the larger the document grows. A better solution for long documents is to keep each chapter, or large chunk, as its own file. You can then take advantage of Word’s Master Document feature to group everything together when it comes time to print or publish. The master document stitches together all individual documents, or subdocuments, even continuing page numbers, headers, footers, and other ongoing elements. The result is a large document that you can print or publish. What qualifies as a large document? Anything over 100 pages qualifies, as far as I’m concerned. When writing a novel, create each chapter as its own document. Keep all those chapter documents in their own folder. Further, use document filenames to help with organization. For example, I name chapters by using numbers: The first chapter is 01, the second is 02, and so on. How to create a master document in Microsoft Word Word’s Master Document feature helps you collect and coordinate individual documents — called subdocuments — and cobble them into one large document. When you have a master document, you can assign continuous page numbers to your work, apply headers and footers throughout the entire project, and take advantage of Word’s Table of Contents, Index, and other list-generating features. To create a big, whopping document from many smaller documents — to create a master document — obey these steps: Start a new, blank document in Word. Press Ctrl+N to quickly summon a new, blank document. Save the document. Yeah, I know — you haven’t yet written anything. Don’t worry: By saving now, you get ahead of the game and avoid some weird error messages. Switch to Outline view. Click the View tab, and then click the Outline button. On the Outlining tab in the Master Document group, click the Show Document button. The Master Document group is instantly repopulated with more buttons. One of these is the Insert button, used to build the master document. Click the Insert button. Use the Insert Subdocument dialog box to hunt down the first document to insert in the master document. The documents must be inserted in order. I hope you used a clever document-naming scheme. Click the Open button to stick the document in the master document. The document appears in the window, but it’s ugly because Outline view is active. Don’t worry: It won’t be ugly when it is printed! If you’re asked a question about conflicting styles, click the Yes to All button. It keeps all subdocument styles consistent with the master document. (Although it’s best when all documents use the same document template.) Word sets itself up for you to insert the next document: Repeat Steps 5–7 to build the master document. Save the master document when you’ve finished inserting all subdocuments. At this point, the master document is created. It’s what you use to print or save the entire, larger document. You can still edit and work on the individual documents. Any changes you make are reflected in the master document. In fact, the only time you really need to work in the master document is when you choose to edit the headers and footers, create a table of contents, or work on other items that affect the entire document. When you’re ready, you can publish the master document just as you publish any individual document. Use the Collapse Subdocuments button to hide all subdocument text. For example, if you need to create a table of contents or work on the master document’s headers and footers, collapsing the subdocuments makes the process easier. Alas, the master document method isn’t perfect. It’s good for printing, but for creating an eBook, it’s better to use a single large document instead of multiple documents poured into a master document. How to split a Microsoft Word document Splitting a document isn’t a part of creating a master document, but it might be the way you start. If you write your novel as one long document, I recommend that you split it into smaller documents. A simple shortcut doesn’t exist; instead, you have to cut and paste to create smaller documents out of a huge one. Here’s how to split a document: Select half the document — the portion you want to split into a new document. Or, if you’re splitting a document into several pieces, select the first chunk that you want to plop into a new document. For example, split the document at the chapter breaks or a main heading break. Cut the selected block. Press Ctrl+X to cut the block. Summon a new, blank document. Ctrl+N does the trick. Or, if you’re using a template (and you should be), start a new document with that template. Paste the document portion. Press Ctrl+V to paste. If the text doesn’t paste in with the proper formatting, click the Home tab, and in the Clipboard group, click the Paste button. Click the Keep Source Formatting command button. Save the new document. Continue splitting the larger document by repeating these steps. After you’ve finished splitting the larger document, you can safely delete it.

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How Writers Can Use Word 2019's Outline View

Article / Updated 01-08-2019

Good writers use an outline to organize their thoughts. Back in the old days, an outline would dwell on a stack of 3-by-5 cards. Today, an outline is a Word document, which makes it easier to not confuse your outline with grandma’s recipes. Word’s Outline view presents a document in a unique way. It takes advantage of Word’s heading styles to help you group and organize thoughts, ideas, or plotlines in a hierarchical fashion. Outline tools make it easy to shuffle around topics, make subtopics, and mix in text to help organize your thoughts. Even if you’re not a writer, you can use Word’s Outline mode to create lists, work on projects, or look busy when the boss comes around. Entering Outline view To enter Outline view, click the View tab, and in the Views group, click the Outline button. The document’s presentation changes to show Outline view, and the Outlining tab appears on the Ribbon, as shown. To exit Outline view, click the View tab and choose another document view. You can also click the big, honkin’ Close Outline View button. A squat, horizontal bar marks the end of the outline. You cannot delete that bar. All basic Word commands work in Outline view. You can use the cursor keys, delete text, check spelling, save, insert oddball characters, print, and so on. Don't worry about the text format in Outline view; outlining is not about formatting. Word uses the Heading 1 through Heading 9 styles for the outline’s topics. Main topics are formatted in Heading 1, subtopics in Heading 2, and so on. Use the Body or Normal style to make notes or add text to the outline. An outline isn’t a special type of document; it’s a different view. You can switch between Outline view and any other view and the document’s contents don’t change. Typing topics in the Microsoft Word outline Outlines are composed of topics and subtopics. Topics are main ideas; subtopics describe the details. Subtopics can contain their own subtopics, going down to several levels of detail. The amount of detail you use depends on how organized you want to be. To create a topic, type the text. Word automatically formats the topic using a specific heading style based on the topic level, as shown. Keep the main topic levels short and descriptive. Deeper topics can go into more detail. Press the Enter key when you’re done typing one topic and want to start another. Use the Enter key to split a topic. For example, to split the topic Pots and Pans, replace the word and with a press of the Enter key. To join two topics, press the End key to send the insertion pointer to the end of the first topic. Then press the Delete key. This method works just like joining two paragraphs in a regular document. Don’t worry about organizing the outline when you first create it. In Word’s Outline view, you can rearrange topics as your ideas solidify. My advice is to start writing things down now and concentrate on organization later. How to rearrange topics in Microsoft Word Outlines are fluid. As you work, some topics may become more important and others less important. To these changes, you can move a topic up or down: Click the Move Up button (or press Alt+Shift+↑) to move a topic up a line. Click the Move Down button (or press Alt+Shift+↓) to move a topic down a line. You can also drag a topic up or down: Point the mouse pointer at the circle to the topic’s left. When the mouse is positioned just right, the mouse pointer changes to a 4-way arrow. I recommend using this trick only when you’re moving topics a short distance; dragging beyond the current screen can prove unwieldy. If you need to move a topic and all its subtopics, first collapse the topic. When the topic is expanded, only the topic itself is moved. How to demote and promote topics in Microsoft Word Outline organization also includes demoting topics that are really subtopics and promoting subtopics to a higher level. Making such adjustments is a natural part of working in Outline view. Click the Demote button (or press Alt+Shift+→) to demote a topic into a subtopic. Click the Promote button (or press Alt+Shift+←) to promote a topic. New topics you type are created at the same level as the topic above (where you pressed the Enter key). To instantly make any topic a main-level topic, click the Promote to Heading 1 button. You can use the mouse to promote or demote topics: Drag the topic’s circle left or right. I admit that this move can be tricky, which is why I use the keyboard shortcuts or buttons on the Ribbon to promote or demote topics. You don’t really create subtopics in Word as much as you demote higher-level topics. Promoting or demoting a topic changes the paragraph format. For example, demoting a top-level topic changes the style from Heading 1 to Heading 2. The subtopic also appears indented on the screen. The Level menu in the Outlining tab’s Outline Tools group changes to reflect the current topic level. You can also use this item’s drop-down list to promote or demote the topic to any specific level in the outline. Unlike with main topics, you can get wordy with subtopics. After all, the idea here is to expand on the main topic. According to Those Who Know Such Things, you must have at least two subtopics for them to qualify as subtopics. When you have only one subtopic, either you have a second main topic or you’ve created a text topic. How to expand and collapse topics in Microsoft Word A detailed outline is wonderful, the perfect tool to help you write that novel, organize a meeting, or set priorities. To help you pull back from the detail and see the Big Picture, you can collapse all or part of an outline. Even when you’re organizing, sometimes it helps to collapse a topic to help keep it in perspective. Any topic with subtopics shows a plus sign (+) in its circle. To collapse the topic and temporarily hide its subtopics, you have several choices: Click the Collapse button on the Outlining toolbar. Press the Alt+Shift+_ (underline) keyboard shortcut. Double-click the plus sign to the topic’s left. When a topic is collapsed, it features a fuzzy underline, in addition to a plus sign in the icon to the topic’s left. To expand a collapsed topic, you have several choices: Click the Expand button on the Outlining toolbar. Press Alt+Shift++ (plus sign). Click the topic’s plus sign. The fastest way to display an outline at a specific topic level is to choose that level from the Show Level drop-down list. To find that command, look on the Outlining toolbar, in the Outline Tools group. For example, to show only Level 1 and Level 2 topics, choose Level 2 from the Show Level button’s menu. Topics at Level 3 and higher remain collapsed. To see the entire outline, choose Show All Levels from the Show Level menu. When some of the subtopics get wordy, place a check mark by the Show First Line Only option. (Look on the Outlining tab in the Outline Tools group for this setting.) When it’s active, Word displays only the first topic line of text in any topic. How to add a text topic to a Microsoft Word outline Creating an outline can potentially be about writing text. When the mood hits you, write! Rather than write prose as a topic, use the Demote to Body Text command. Here’s how: Press the Enter key to start a new topic. On the Outlining tab, in the Outline Tools group, click the Demote to Body Text button. The keyboard shortcut is Ctrl+Shift+N, which is also the keyboard shortcut for the Normal style. These steps change the text style to Body Text. That way, you can write text for a speech, some instructions in a list, or a chunk of dialogue from your novel and not have it appear as a topic or subtopic. How to print a Microsoft Word outline Printing an outline works just like printing any other document in Word but with one big difference: Only visible topics are printed. To control visible topics, use the Show Level menu. For example, to print the entire outline, choose All Levels from the Show Level menu and then print. To print only the first two levels of an outline, choose Level 2 from the Show Level drop-down list and then print. Word uses the heading styles when it prints the outline, although it does not indent topics.

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How to Collaborate on the Internet in Word 2019

Article / Updated 01-08-2019

Most document changes are made sequentially: You write something, save, and then someone else works on the document. If that chaos isn’t enough for you, Word allows you to invite people to edit a document while you’re working on it. This collaboration feature is called Sharing, probably because a better name wasn’t available or Microsoft was pressed for time. To make document sharing work, save your document to the cloud, or Internet storage. Specifically, the document must be saved to Microsoft’s OneDrive storage. How to share a Microsoft Word document After saving a document to OneDrive online storage, follow these steps to make the document available for collaboration: Click the Share button. The Share button is located above the Ribbon, near the upper right part of the document’s window. Upon success, the Share pane appears. Upon failure, you see a prompt asking you to save the document to OneDrive. Type an email address to invite a collaborator. If you use Outlook as your computer’s address book, click the Address Book icon to the right of the Invite People box to automatically add people. Choose whether the collaborators can edit. Choose Can View from the menu, and the people you invite can read the document. Choose Can Edit, and they can make changes. Type a message in the Include a Message box. Click the Share button. The invites are sent. Eventually, the recipients receive the email invite. To access the shared document, they click the link in the email address. Their web browser program opens and displays the document. If they want to edit the document, they click the link Edit in Browser. At that point, their web browser displays the document as it appears in Word, complete with a customized version of the Ribbon. Hack away. How to check updates in Microsoft Word To determine whether someone has edited your shared document, open the shared document and click the Share button found near the upper right corner of the document window. The Share pane lists all collaborators and whether they’re currently editing. Collaborators who are currently editing show avatar icons to the left of the Share icon atop the document window. If they’re actively editing, you see a color-coded insertion pointer appear in your document, showing where the collaborator is working. If collaborators have changed the document, save your copy to view updates: Click the Save icon on the Quick Access toolbar, or press Ctrl+S. Any changed content appears in the document with a colored overlay, similar to how revision marks are displayed. To check to see whether updates are pending, click the File tab, and on the Info screen, look for and click the button titled Document Updates Available.

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How to Use Revisions in Word 2019

Article / Updated 01-08-2019

All good writers should enjoy feedback. Still, I’d like to know what’s been done to my text, not only to see the effect but also to learn something. Word’s revision-tracking tools make such a review possible. How to compare two versions of a Microsoft Word document You have the original copy of your document — the stuff you wrote. You also have the copy that Brianne, the soulless automaton from the legal department, has worked over. Your job is to compare them to see exactly what’s been changed from the original. Here’s what to do: Click the Review tab. In the Compare group, choose Compare →  Compare. The Compare Documents dialog box shows up. Choose the original document from the Original Document drop-down list. The list shows recently opened or saved documents. Choose one, or use the Browse item to summon the Open dialog box and hunt down the document. Choose the edited document from the Revised Document drop-down list. Choose the document from the list, or use the Browse item to locate the changed, altered, or mangled document. Click OK. Word compares the two documents. The changes are displayed in a quadruple-split window, as illustrated. This presentation is actually a third document, titled Compare Result. Look it over! Peruse the changes made to your pristine prose by the barbarian interlopers: Scrolling is synchronized between all three documents: original, edited, and compared. Click a change in the reviewing pane (shown on the left) to quickly see which part of your document was folded, spindled, or mutilated. Changed text is highlighted in two ways: Added text is underlined. Removed text is shown in strikethrough style. You can confirm or reject the changes in the Compare Result document, just as you would when tracking changes manually. How to tracking changes as they’re made in Microsoft Word To be a kind and gentle collaborator, activate Word’s Tracking feature before you make changes to someone else’s text: Click the Review tab, and in the Tracking group, click the Track Changes button, shown in the margin. From that point on, any changes made to the document are color coded based on who is making the changes and what level of markup is displayed: For Simple Markup, a color-coded bar appears to the left of a paragraph, indicating that a change was made. For All Markup, new text is color coded, depending on who made the changes. Added text appears underlined, and deleted text appears as strikethrough. These text highlights are called revision marks. They are not text-formatting attributes. For No Markup, the changes are tracked but not displayed in the document. This is a great setting to choose for the least amount of distraction. (The revision marks can be seen by choosing All Markup instead of No Markup.) Word continues to track changes and edits in the document until you turn off Track Changes. To do so, click the Track Changes button again. Although the Track Changes button appears highlighted while the feature is active, a better way to check — and use — this feature is to activate the Track Settings option on the status bar. To set this option, right-click the status bar and choose Track Changes. As a bonus, you can click this item on the status bar to activate or deactivate revision marks in the document. How to review changes in Microsoft Word After your poor, limp document is returned to you, the best way to review the damage inflicted is to use the commands on the Review tab, located in the Changes group. These commands are illustrated here; depending on the window size, you may or may not see text explaining what each one does. To review changes throughout the document, click the Next or Previous buttons. Click a button to hop from one change in the text to the next change. Click the Accept button when you tolerate the change. To reject a change, click the Reject button. After clicking either button, you instantly see the next change in the document, until all the changes are dealt with. The Accept and Reject buttons host menus with commands that accept or reject all changes in your document in one fell swoop. The only thing missing is the “swoop!” sound when you use these commands. You can view a summary of changes by summoning the Revisions pane: On the Review tab, in the Tracking group, click the Reviewing Pane button. The Revisions pane doesn’t show the changes in context, but it lists each one. Click an item in the Revisions pane to hop to each change in the document. To see changes in the text, ensure that you choose the All Markup command from the Display for Review menu button. When you goof while approving or rejecting a change, press Ctrl+Z to undo. You can also right-click any revision mark to accept or reject it.

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How to Use Comments in Microsoft Word 2019

Article / Updated 01-08-2019

Perhaps the least aggressive method of collaboration in Microsoft Word is to add a comment to a document’s text. In olden times, you would scrawl your remarks by using a different text color or ALL CAPS or by surrounding your observations with triple curly brackets. Instead of using such awkward and silly methods, consider clicking the Review tab and being prepared to use some tools abiding in the Comments group. How to add a comment in Microsoft Word To adroitly thrust a comment into a document, follow these steps: Select the chunk of text upon which you desire to comment. Be specific. You may be tempted to select an entire phrase, but only the first few words are necessary. Click the Review tab. In the Comments group, click the New Comment button. The New Comment button is shown here. Click it to see the Comments box appear to the right of the current page, similar to what’s shown in the following figure. The side of the page where the comment appears is called the markup area. Type a comment. Jot down your thoughts. I’m not sure how long a comment can be; if you want to blab, send an email instead. For some reason, text formatting can be applied to the comment. Press the Esc key when you’ve finished typing the comment. Or you can click in the document’s text. How to reply to a comment in Microsoft Word Comments aren’t intended to hang in space — unless you just want to ignore them. Otherwise, you have two choices for dealing with a comment. To reply to a comment, click the Reply button. Your name appears in the comment box, and you’re offered the opportunity to jot down a counterpoint, rebuttal, or curse. When the commented issue is no longer an issue, mark the comment as resolved: Click the Resolve button for the comment. The original comment is dimmed, which allows collaborators to still read it. And, if further issues arise, click the Reopen button to continue adding comments. How to show or hide comments in Word 2019 The markup area (to the right of your text) appears whenever a document features comments. To hide this area, click the Review tab. In the Tracking group, click the Display for Review button, shown in the margin. The four available options set how comments, as well as other document revisions, are displayed: Simple Markup: Chose this item to display the markup area and view limited comments and revisions. All Markup: Choose this item to display the markup area, where all comments and revisions are shown, along with lines referencing their locations in the text. No Markup: Choose this item to hide the markup area. Comments don’t appear, and any revisions are hidden in the text. Original: Choose this item to hide the markup area as well as any revisions made to the document. With regard to comments, this item is identical to No Markup. I recommend working with document comments in Print Layout view, which works best. If you choose Draft view, the comments appear as bracketed initials highlighted with a specific background color. For example, my comments look like [DG1], where DG is my initials and the 1 represents Comment 1. Position the mouse pointer at that text to view the comment in a pop-up bubble. To view all comments, no matter which document view is chosen, summon the Reviewing pane: On the Review tab, in the Tracking group, click the Reviewing Pane button. Choose either the horizontal or vertical display to summon the Reviewing pane and peruse comments as well as text revisions. Perusing Microsoft Word comments one at a time To get an idea of how commenting goes, don’t just randomly scroll through your document trying to find the next gripe or compliment. Instead, use the Next Comment and Previous Comment buttons. These buttons are found on the Review tab, in the Comments group. Click the Next Comment button to jump to the next comment in the document. Click the Previous Comment button to jump to the previous comment in the document. Clicking either the Next Comment or Previous Comment button activates All Markup view. How to print comments (or not) in Microsoft Word Yes, it’s horrible, but comments print with your document. This output is probably not what you intended, so follow these steps: Press Ctrl+P. The Print screen appears. Click the Print All Pages button to view its menu. Choose the Print Markup command. This setting controls whether comments, as well as other text markup, print. Remove the check mark to suppress comments on the hard copy. The Print Preview window confirms whether comments and other markup print. Make any other settings in the Print window as needed. Click the big Print button to print the document. You must follow these steps every time you print the document otherwise, the comments print. How to delete comments in Microsoft Word Not only is the comment’s issue resolved, but you also don’t want to be reminded of the comment ever again. Work these steps: Click the Review tab. Click the Next Comment or Previous Comment button to locate the offending comment. Upon success, the comment is highlighted in the markup area. In the Comments area, choose Delete →Delete. The Delete button is one of those menu button icon-things that you must click to access the commands. Repeat Steps 2 and 3 to remove additional comments. Or just keep repeating Step 2 until you find a comment worthy of obliteration. To delete all comments from a document in a single act of massive retaliation, use the Delete Comment button's menu: Choose Delete→Delete All Comments in Document.

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How to Customize the Microsoft Word 2019 Quick Access Toolbar

Article / Updated 01-08-2019

Back in the old days, you could seriously mess with how the Microsoft Word window looked. You could add toolbars, remove toolbars, modify toolbars, create your own toolbars, and generally use the word toolbars over and over again until it lost its meaning. Today, Word isn’t quite as flexible as it once was, but you’re still allowed to customize a toolbar. The Quick Access toolbar is illustrated here. It’s found in the upper left corner of the window. Click a wee icon on the Quick Access toolbar to activate a feature. You can customize the toolbar by removing icons you don’t use and adding icons you do. When the Quick Access toolbar grows too many custom buttons and it begins to crowd into the document’s title, place it below the Ribbon: Choose the Show Below the Ribbon command from the toolbar menu. To move the Quick Access toolbar back atop the Ribbon, choose the Show Above the Ribbon command. Word is configured to show several buttons on the Quick Access toolbar: AutoSave (for documents saved to OneDrive), Open, Save, Undo, and Redo. If you have a touchscreen PC, another button appears, Touch/Mouse Mode. Adding buttons to the Quick Access toolbar in Microsoft Word When you enjoy using a Word command so much that you see the command button icon when you close your eyes, consider adding the command to the Quick Access toolbar. To quickly add a common command to the Quick Access tollbar, click the menu button as illustrated. Choose a command from the menu to add it to the Quick Access toolbar. For other commands, those that don’t appear on the Quick Access toolbar menu, locate the command button on the Ribbon. Right-click the command button and choose Add to Quick Access toolbar from the shortcut menu that pops up. Word remembers the Quick Action toolbar’s commands. They show up again the next time you start Word, in every document window. Some commands place buttons on the toolbar, and others place drop-down menus or text boxes. Editing the Quick Access toolbar in Microsoft Word If your adoration of the Quick Access toolbar turns into an obsession, you can go hog-wild modifying the thing: Choose More Commands from the Quick Access toolbar’s menu. You see the Word Options dialog box with the Quick Access Toolbar area shown, as illustrated. Use the list on the left to choose a new command to add to the Quick Access toolbar. The list on the right shows items currently on the toolbar. Use the up or down buttons to move items up or down (left or right) on the Quick Access toolbar. Click the OK button when you finish editing. Choose the All Commands item from the Choose Commands From menu (refer to Figure 29-3) to view every possible command in Word. Sometimes, a missing command that you think could be elsewhere ends up being available in the All Commands list — for example, the once-popular Save All command or the Tabs command, which quickly displays the Tabs dialog box. When the command list grows long, consider organizing it. Use the item to help group similar commands. This item appears as a vertical bar on the Quick Access toolbar. Yes, some commands lack specific graphics on their buttons; they show up as large dots on the toolbar. To return the Quick Access toolbar to the way Word originally had it, choose Reset → Reset Only Quick Access toolbar from the Word Options window. (Refer to the lower right corner in the figure.) Removing items from the Quick Access toolbar To remove a command from the Quick Access toolbar, right-click its command button and choose Remove from Quick Access toolbar. Likewise, you can choose a command with a check mark from the Customize Quick Access Toolbar menu. Or you can use the Word Options dialog box to remove items.

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How to Use Microsoft Word's Borders and Shading Dialog Box

Article / Updated 01-08-2019

To fully flex Word’s border bravado, summon the Borders and Shading dialog box: Click the Home tab. In the Paragraph group, click the triangle by the Borders button to display the Borders menu. Choose the Borders and Shading command. The Borders and Shading dialog box appears, as shown. Unlike the Borders menu, additional and custom border-setting options are available in the Borders and Shading dialog box. Most notably, you can set the border line style, thickness, and color. The Borders and Shading dialog box also allows you to place a border around a page. You can use the commands in the Borders and Shading dialog box to format a table. Creating a fancy title in Word 2019 To create custom titles for newsletters, documents, or anything else you want to pretend is super important, click to select a paragraph and then go nuts in the Borders and Shading dialog box. You may end up with results similar to what’s shown here. To properly apply a special border, follow these general steps in the Borders and Shading dialog box: Choose a line style in the Style list. Scroll the list to view the full variety of styles. Set the color in the Color list. The Automatic color uses black, or the standard color as set by the document’s theme (usually black). Choose a width in the Width list. Click in the Preview part of the dialog box to place the line: top, bottom, right, or left. To remove a line, click it in the Preview window. To start out quickly, select a preset design from the list of icons on the right side of the dialog box. Click the OK button to apply the customized border to your document’s text. Boxing text in Microsoft Word The border is primarily a paragraph-level format, though you can also wrap borders around tiny tidbits of text. To do so, follow these steps: Select the text. Summon the Borders and Shading dialog box. Set the border style you desire. Only the Box and Shadow options are available, although you can set the color and line thickness. Ensure that the Apply To menu shows Text and not Paragraph. Click OK. From a design point of view, I believe shading text is a better option than wrapping it in a box. Applying a page border in Microsoft Word One gem hidden in the Borders and Shading dialog box is the tool to place a border around an entire page of text. The border sits at the page’s margins and is in addition to any paragraph borders you might apply. Here are the secret directions to set a page border: Put the insertion pointer on the page you want to border. For example, you might put it on the first page in the document. Summon the Borders and Shading dialog box. Click the Page Border tab. Set the border style. Choose a preset style, line style, color, thickness Use the Art drop-down list to choose a funky pattern for the border. Click the Apply To menu button to select which pages you want bordered. Choose Whole Document to put borders on every page. To select the first page, choose the This Section – First Page Only item. Other options let you choose other pages and groups, as shown in the drop-down list. And now, the secret: Click the Options button. The Border and Shading Options dialog box appears. In the Measure From drop-down list, choose the Text option. The Edge of Page option just doesn't work with most printers. Text does. To add more “air” between the text and the border, increase the values in the Margin area. Click OK. Click OK to close the Borders and Shading dialog box. To remove the page border, choose None under Settings in Step 4 and then click OK. A page border is a page-level format. If you desire borders to sit on only certain pages, split the document into sections. Use the Apply To drop-down menu (refer to Step 5) to select the current section for the page borders.

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