Samsung Galaxy S20 For Dummies book cover

Samsung Galaxy S20 For Dummies

By: Bill Hughes Published: 09-01-2020

Get the most out of the powerful new Samsung Galaxy S20

With its superfast refresh rate for seamless browsing and spectacularly enhanced camera—among many other goodies—there’s a lot to enjoy about your sleek new Samsung S20. Whether you’re a Samsung newbie or an upgrading customer, Samsung Galaxy S20 for Dummies is the perfect guide to the latest generation.

From the basics, like setup and security, to the fun, like the supercool Single Take mode, this book has you covered from the moment you take your new smartphone out of its shiny new box. Want to watch movies? Navigate your way around with GPS? Say hello to family and friends on social media? All the easy-to-follow tips and tricks that make it fast and fun are pages away!

  • Configure and personalize your new phone
  • Get going with the best features, apps, and games
  • Shoot eye-popping photo and video with 30x zoom and nighttime mode
  • Sync with your other devices

Whatever you want to use it for gaming with friends, in-app conferencing or emailing for work, shooting home movies, sending witty Tweets—or even making phone calls—this friendly, no-nonsense how-to is the best guide to your galaxy. Enjoy!

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Samsung Galaxy S20 For Dummies Cheat Sheet

Cheat Sheet / Updated 02-25-2022

Your Samsung Galaxy S20 smartphone allows you to do many of the same things as previous versions of the Galaxy. You can change the font size for texting conversations and take selfies. You can also access Galaxy applications while you’re talking on the S20. Navigating your Samsung Galaxy S20 doesn’t have to be difficult.

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How to Play Games on Your Samsung S20

Article / Updated 09-14-2020

The fact of the matter is that your Samsung Galaxy S20, with its large Super AMOLED screen and beefy graphics processing unit, makes Android-based games more fun. And because you already have one, maybe you should take a break and concentrate on having fun! Games are the most popular kind of download for smartphones of all kinds. In spite of the focus on business productivity, socializing, and making your life simpler, games outpace all other application downloads. To this point, the electronic gaming industry has larger revenues than the movie industry — and has for several years! We could have a lively and intellectually stimulating debate on the merits of games versus applications. Simply, the differences between games and apps are as follows: If a person likes a game, he or she tends to play it for a while, maybe for a few weeks or even months, and then stops using it. A person who likes an app tends to keep on using it. Games tend to use more of the graphical capabilities of your phone. People who use their phones for games tend to like to try a wide range of games. The Play Store Games category The Play Store is shown in the following figure. The top level splits offerings into a few categories: Home, Games, Movies & TV, and a few other categories off to the right. We want games. Games that test our skills; games that are fun; games that are cute; games that immerse us in an alternate universe! To get there, tap on the Games button! This brings up the Games page as shown. This section of the store has nothing but games. This section includes everything from simple puzzles to simulated violence. All games involve various combinations of intellect, skill (either cognitive or motor), and role-playing. Let’s do it. The Games Home screen If you scroll around this screen, you see many suggested games. If you aren’t sure what games you might like to try, don’t worry: There are lots of options. As you can see, the Games Home screen makes lots of suggestions. Each row takes a different perspective on helping you find a new game. A few of these are board games, strategy games, and action games. They also include games that allow you to play offline without Wi-Fi. Another approach is to choose the Categories options. This will bring up the game categories shown here. The Games Categories tab In the Play Store, games are divided into the following genres: Action: Games that involve shooting projectiles that can range from marshmallows to bullets to antiballistic missiles. They also involve fighting games with every level of gore possible. Adventure: Games that take you to virtual worlds where you search for treasure and/or fight evil. Zombies and vampires are traditional evildoers. Arcade: Game room and bar favorites. Board: Versions of familiar (and some not-so-familiar) board games. Card: All the standard card games are here. Casino: Simulations of gambling games; no real money changes hands. Casual: Games that you can easily pick up and put aside (unless you have and addictive personality). Educational: Enjoyable games that also offer users enhanced skills or information. Music: Includes a wide range of games that involve music in one way or another. These games may include trivia, educational games involving learning music, or sing-a-long songs for kids. Puzzle: Includes games like Sudoku, word search, and Trivial Pursuit. Racing: Cars, go-karts, snowboards, jet skis, biplanes, jets, or spacecraft competing with one another. Role Playing: In a virtual world, become a different version of who you are in real life, be it for better or worse. Simulation: Rather than live in the virtual world of some game designer, create and manage your own virtual world. Sports: Electronic interpretations of real-world activities that incorporate some of the skill or strategy elements of the original game; vary based upon the level of detail. Strategy: Emphasize decision-making skills, like chess; a variety of games with varying levels of complexity and agreement with reality. Trivia: A variety of games that reward you if you know things like the name of the family dog from the TV show My Three Sons. Its name was Tramp, but you knew that already. Word: Games that are universally popular, such as Scrabble. Many games appear in more than one category. Each game has a Description page. It’s similar to the Description page for apps, but it emphasizes different attributes. Here is an example of a typical Description page. When you’re in a category that looks promising, look for these road signs to help you check out and narrow your choices among similar titles: Ratings/Comments: Gamers love to exalt good games and bash bad ones. The comments for the game shown are complimentary, and the overall ranking next to the game name at the top suggests that many others are favorable. About This Game: This tells you the basic idea behind the game. What’s New: This section tells what capabilities have been added since the previous release. This is relevant if you have an earlier version of this game. Reviews: Here is where existing users get to vent their spleen if they do not like the game or brag about how smart they are for buying it ahead of you. The comments are anonymous, include the date the comment was left, and tell you the kind of device the commenter used. There can be applications that lag on some older devices. However, you have the Galaxy S20, which has the best of everything (for now). More Games by Developer: If you have a positive experience with a given game, you may want to check that developer’s other games. The More By section makes it easier for you to find these other titles. Users Also Viewed/Users Also Installed: This shows you the other apps that other people who downloaded this app have viewed or downloaded. These are some apps that you may want to check out. Price: As a tie-breaker among similar titles, a slightly higher price is a final indication of a superior game. And because you’re only talking a few pennies, price isn’t usually a big deal. How to leave feedback on games For applications in general, and games in particular, the Play Store is a free market. When you come in to the Play Store, your best path to finding a good purchase is to read the reviews of those who have gone before you. Although more than a million users have commented on Angry Birds, most games do not have that kind of following. One could argue that your opinion would not move the overall rating for a frequently reviewed game like Angry Birds. The same cannot be said for other games. One of the new paid games is Dungeoneers from Monsterious Games. The game description is shown here. A Description page, before you download it to your phone, will show either the Install button or the price of the game; the feedback areas will be grayed out. The Description page after you download the game to your phone will offer the options to Open or Uninstall, and the feedback areas will be active. In this case, Dungeoneers has been reviewed by 134 gamers, most of whom are pretty darn enthusiastic. Your opinion matters more for this game than for the heavily reviewed games. After you’ve downloaded and played a game, you can help make the system work by providing your own review. This discussion reviews the process, starting from the first screen of the Play Store: Tap the Menu icon. This brings up a pop-up menu like the one shown. Tap My Apps & Games. This brings up the applications and games that you’ve downloaded, as shown. The Play Store does not distinguish between games and apps in this menu. They’re all in the same list. Tap the game for which you’d like to leave feedback. Tapping the title of the game normally brings up the game description. After you’ve downloaded a game, however, a Rate This App section appears that lets you leave feedback. Tap the stars on the screen. This brings up a pop-up screen, as shown on the left of the figure. Tap the number of stars you believe this game deserves. The stars are between one and five. You’re asked to answer some other questions that are shown, including making any comments on the last pop-up. When you’re done, tap Submit. Your comments are sent to the Play Store for everyone to see. For the sake of the system, make sure your comments are accurate!

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How to Answer Samsung's Questions

Article / Updated 09-14-2020

When you turn on your Samsung Galaxy S20 the first time, it will ask you a series of 10 questions and preferences to configure it. The good folks at Samsung are well-intentioned, but not every customer who owns a Samsung Galaxy S20 knows, from day one, whether he or she wants a Samsung account, what’s a good name for the phone, or what the purpose of a cloud service, such as Dropbox, is and how it would be used. You can relax. I’ll help you answer these questions. On the other hand, if your phone is already set up, you probably took a guess or skipped some questions. Maybe now you’re rethinking some of your choices. No problem. You can go back and change any answer you gave and get your phone to behave the way you want. The following are the kinds of questions you may be asked. These questions may come in this order, but they may not. They typically include the following: Language/Accessibility: This option lets you select your language. The default is English for phones sold within the United States. Also, the phone has some special capabilities for individuals with disabilities. If you have a disability and think you might benefit, take a look at these options. They have really tried to make this phone as usable as possible for as many folks as possible. Wi-Fi: Your phone automatically starts scanning for a Wi-Fi connection. You can always use the cellular connection when you are in cellular coverage, but if there is a Wi-Fi connection available, your phone will try to use this first. It is probably cheaper and may be faster than the cellular. At the same time, you may not want your phone to connect to the Wi-Fi access point with the best signal. It could be that the strongest signal is a fee-based service, whereas the next best signal is free. In any case, this page scans the available options and presents them to you. Date and Time: This is easy. The default setting is to use the time and date that comes from the cellular network and the date and time format is the U.S. style. Just tap on the next button and move on. This date and time from the cellular network is the most accurate information you’ll get, and you don’t need to do anything other than be within cellular coverage now and again. If you prefer non-U.S. formatting, such as a 24-hour clock or day/month/year formatting, you can change your phone any way you want. Sign up for a Samsung Account: Go ahead and sign up for an account. The Samsung account offers you some nice things to help you get your phone back should you lose it. All you need is an account name, such as an email account, and a password. When you buy a Galaxy S20 smartphone, you are now a customer of multiple companies! These include Samsung for the phone hardware, Google for the phone operating system (Android), and the wireless carrier that provides the cellular service. Plus, if you bought the phone through a phone retailer, such as Best Buy, it is in the mix as well. All of them want to make you happy, which is a good thing for the most part. The only downside is that they want to know who you are so that they can provide you with more services. Don’t worry. You control how much they offer you. Google Account Sign-up: Google account means an email account where the address ends in @gmail.com. If you already have an account on Gmail, enter your user ID and password on your phone. If you don’t have a Gmail account, the good news is that you can use your existing email account. I highly recommend that you create a Google account. Location Options: Your phone knowing your location and providing it to an application can be sensitive issue. If you’re really worried about privacy and security, tap the green check marks on the screen and then tap the button that says Next. Selecting these options prevents applications from knowing where you are. (This choice also prevents you from getting directions and a large number of cool capabilities that are built into applications.) The only folks who’ll know your location will be the 911 dispatchers if you dial them. If you’re worried about your security but want to take advantage of some of the cool capabilities built into your phone, tap the right arrow key to move forward. Remember, you can choose on a case-by-case basis whether to share your location. Phone Ownership: This screen asks you to enter your first and last name. Go ahead and put in your real name. Cloud Services: The chances are that you will be offered the option to sign up for a cloud service where you can back up your phone and get access to a gazillion MB of free storage. This can be a tricky decision. You could sign up for every cloud service that comes along. Then you need to remember where you stored that critical file. You could sign up for one, and you may miss a nice capability that is available on another. You could have one cloud service for work and another for personal. Here is what I recommend: Sign up for whatever is the cloud service your phone offers during this initial setup process if you do not already have one. You will see what it is later. If you are happy with a cloud service you already have, such as Dropbox or OneDrive, chances are, they will have all the services you need for you and your phone. You can link your Galaxy S20 to this service by downloading the necessary app. Learn about Key Features: Go ahead and take this tour of all the new things you can do. Or tap the Next button. This screen is for setting up the coolest and the most sophisticated capabilities of the phone. Device Name: When this screen comes up, you’ll see a text box that has the model name. You can keep this name for your phone, or you can choose to personalize it a bit. For example, you can change it to “Bill’s Galaxy S20” or “Indy at 425-555-1234.” The purpose of this name is for connecting to a local data network, as when you’re pairing to a Bluetooth device. If this last sentence made no sense to you, don’t worry about it. Tap Finish. In a moment, you see the Home screen, as shown.

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How to Add non-Gmail Email Accounts to the Galaxy S20

Article / Updated 09-14-2020

Your phone is set up to work with up to 10 email accounts. If you have more than ten accounts, I’m thinking that you might have too much going on in your life. No phone, not even the Galaxy S20, can help you there! After you tell your Galaxy S20 all your email accounts, the Email screen will let you see the inbox of each account or combine all your email in a single inbox. You can choose which option works best for you. How to add your first email account To get started, have your email addresses and passwords ready. When you have them, go to your phone’s Home screen. Look for the Mail icon; it is an envelope in silhouette. This is probably on your Home screen as one of the four primary shortcuts just above the Device Function keys or in your application list. Tap the Mail icon from the Home screen. This brings up a screen like the one shown. Choose one of the options to get started. In every case, it starts with entering your email address. Your email address should include the full shebang, including the @ sign and everything that follows it. Make sure to enter your password correctly, being careful with capitalization if your email server is case-sensitive (most are). If in doubt, select the option that lets you see your password. Tap the box to enter your password. Don’t be surprised if your S20 brings you to a special screen specifically for your email provider for you to enter your password. The following figure shows the sign-in screen for a generic email account. This figure shows the screen for a Microsoft Exchange account. One of these will work. Carefully enter your password in the appropriate field and tap Next. You’re asked for permissions. Just go with the default settings for now. This brings up the screen shown. Select your desired Sync Settings and then tap Next. You can select how often you want your phone and the email service to synchronize. A lot of thought and consideration has been put into the default settings. If you just want to get started, tap Next. If you want to fine-tune things later, it is not hard to go back and adjust these settings. These settings are intended to be gentle on your data usage. If you want images in email to download immediately, store older email messages on your phone, check to see whether you have new email all the time, you can change these settings on this page for this email account. If you know what you want that is different from the default settings, make the changes and then tap Next. Enter a name for the new email account. The next screen gives you the option to call your email account something other than its address. You can call it what you like, but I recommend choosing something shorter, like Joe’s MSN or My Hotmail. Tap Done. Using the following figure as an example, you can see that my account is now registered on my phone. It worked! How to add email accounts After you have entered your first email account, there are a few different steps to add additional accounts. Tap the Options icon at the top-left part of the screen. The three horizontal lines bring up the slide-in screen shown. This allows you to see other email folders. It also lets you access the setting icon. Tap the Settings icon. Tapping Settings brings up the screen shown. Tap Add Account next to the green plus sign. This brings you back to the email setup screen. At this point you can add up to nine more accounts, and remember, you will be asked which email account you want to be your primary account. It is entirely up to you. You can send and receive email from all your accounts by selecting it, but only one can be the primary account used if you send an email from another application, such as the Contacts app. How to set up a corporate email account In addition to personal email accounts, you can add your work email account to your phone — if it’s based upon a Microsoft Exchange server, that is, and if it’s okay with your company’s IT department. Before you get started, you need some information from the IT department of your company: The domain name of the office email server. Your work email password. The name of your exchange server. If the folks in IT are okay with you using your phone to access its email service, your IT department will have no trouble supplying you with this information. Before you set up your work email on your phone, make sure that you have permission. If you do this without the green light from your company, and you end up violating your company’s rules, you could be in hot water. Increasing your productivity won’t be much help if you’re standing out in the parking lot holding all the contents of your office in a cardboard box. Assuming that your company wants you to be more productive with no extra cost to the company, the process for adding your work email starts at your email Home screen shown. Enter your email address and password. The Corporate screen is shown. Tap Manual Setup. This brings up the screen shown. The chances are that you haven’t got the foggiest notion what any of this means or what you are to do now. Verify that your IT department is good with you having email on your own device and have them give you the necessary settings. Seriously. It is increasingly common that a firm will give you access on your phone. At the same time, they do not generally circulate documents with how to make this happen. This would be a big security problem if anyone could get access. Save yourself the time and get help from IT.

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How to Set Up Email on the Galaxy S20

Article / Updated 09-14-2020

These days, many people have multiple personal email address for many reasons. Your phone’s Email app can manage up to 10 email accounts. With a Galaxy S20 phone, you’ll want to create Google account if you don’t already have one. If you don’t have a Google account, you’ll miss out on so many exciting capabilities that it’s almost worth settling for a lesser phone. If you have an email account that ends in @gmail.com, by default you have a Google account. If you do not have an account that ends in @gmail.com, you can either create a Google account with your existing email or create a separate email account on Google’s Gmail just for your phone. Setting up a new Gmail account if you don’t have one already is easy, but it isn’t too hard to use an existing email for a Google account. The Email app on your phone routinely “polls” all the email systems for which you identify an email account and password. It then presents you with copies of your email. Your phone mainly interacts with your inbox on your email account. It isn’t really set up to work like the full-featured email application on your computer, though. For example, many email packages integrate with a sophisticated word processor, have sophisticated filing systems for your saved messages, and offer lots of fonts. As long as you don’t mind working without these capabilities, you might never need to get on your computer to access your email again, and you could store email in folders on your phone. Setup is easy, and having access to all your email makes you so productive that I advise you to consider adding all your email accounts to your phone. In general, connecting to a personal email account simply involves entering the name of your email account(s) and its password(s) in your phone. Have these handy when you’re ready to set up your phone. As mentioned, you can have up to 10 email accounts on your phone; however, you do need to pick one account as your favorite. You can send an email using any of the accounts, but your phone wants to know the email account that you want it to use as a default. Next, you may want to have access to your work account. This is relatively common these days, but some companies see this as a security problem. You should consult with your IT department for some extra information. Technologically, it’s not hard to make this kind of thing happen as long as your business email is reasonably modern. The advantages of setting up a Google account Several important functions on your phone require a Google account: The ability to buy applications from the Google Play Store. (This is big!) The ability to use the Google Drive for storage. (This is pretty important and almost huge!) Free access to the photo site Google Photos (although other sites have many of the same features). Automatic backup of your contacts and calendar. To make a long story short, it’s worth the trouble to get a Google account, even if you already have a personal email account. How to set up an existing gmail account If you already have a Gmail account, setting it up on your phone is easy as can be. Follow these steps from the Apps menu: Find the Gmail icon in the Apps list. Here is a confusing part. The icon on the left in the figure is the Gmail app. The icon on the right is for the general email app. The general email app is for your combined email accounts. The general email account is the app that you will use to access any and all of your email accounts. Tap the Gmail icon. Because your phone does not know if you have a Gmail account yet, it offers you the option of entering your Gmail account or whether you want to create a new account. This page is shown here. Enter your Gmail account email address and tap Next. Be sure to include the @gmail.com suffix. Enter your existing Gmail password and tap Next. Go ahead and type your password. When you’re ready, tap Next on the keyboard. You may get a pop-up reconfirming that you agree with the terms of use and all that legal stuff. Tap OK. You’ll see lots of flashing lights and whirling circles while your phone and your Gmail account get to know each other. If everything is correct, your phone and your account get acquainted and become best friends. After a few minutes, they are ready to serve your needs. There are even a few screens that tell you all the wonderful things that your Gmail account will do for you. Believe every word! If you have a problem, you probably mistyped something. Try retyping your information. From this point on, any email you get in your Gmail account will also appear on your phone! How to set up a new Gmail account If you need to set up a new Gmail account, you have a few more steps to follow. Before you get into the steps, think up a good user ID and password. Gmail has been around for a while. That means all the good, simple email addresses are taken. Unless you plan to start using this email account as your main email, which you could do if you wanted, you’re probably best off if you pick some unusual combination of letters and numbers that you can remember for now to get through this process. When you have all of this ready, follow Steps 1 and 2 in the previous section, but tap the Create Account link when you get to the screen shown previously. From there, follow these steps: Enter your first and last names on the screen. Google asks for your name in the screen shown. This is how Google personalizes any communications it has with you. You may be tempted to use a fake name or some other clever two-word combination in place of a name. Don’t do it. You will still be getting email to Rita Book or Warren Peace long after the humor has worn off. Enter the username you want to use with Gmail. On the screen shown, enter the username you want. Hopefully you get this name approved on the first shot. If your first choice isn’t available, try again. There is no easy way to check before you go through these steps. Eventually, you hit on an unused ID, or you will use one of the suggestions in blue font. When you’re successful, it will congratulate you. Pick a good password of at least eight characters. Be sure to pick one that is unique and that you can remember. Enter the other information and an alternate email address and tap Continue. If you forget your password, Google wants to verify that you’re really you and not someone pretending to be you. Google does this check by sending a confirmation email to another account or sending a text to your phone. You can do this now or tap Skip to do it later. After you tap Done, light flashes, and you see the screen working away. This process usually takes less than two minutes. While you wait, you’ll see all kinds of messages that it’s getting ready to sync things. Don’t worry. I explain these messages in good time.

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How to Set Up and Use Samsung Pay on the Galaxy S20

Article / Updated 09-14-2020

The first step here is to make sure that you have Samsung Pay on your Galaxy S20. As cool as this app is, there are many options to this technology, and your carrier may have preferred to not have it preloaded. No problem. Download the application from the Play Store. The Samsung Pay logo is seen here. It is easy to confuse Samsung Pay and Google Pay. These are two different applications. Google Pay is nice, but it does not have the Magnetic Secure Transmission capability that allows you to use mobile payments at many more retailers. The app page description is shown here. When you tap Install, you get the image on the right. The Samsung Pay app works a little different than most other apps. The first time you open Samsung Pay, you will be given information on how to use it and be asked to put in your credit card information (in a very convenient way, by the way) and asked all kinds of permissions and agreements. Once you have given all this information, Samsung Pay waits patiently at the bottom of your home pages, ready to meet your payment needs with nothing more than a quick swipe from the bottom of the screen. Most people would simply not use this app if they had to go digging through their screens to find the app. This way, you do not have to search to find the app and wait for it to come up. This figure shows the Home screen with the Samsung Pay launch button sitting at the bottom ready to appear with a quick flick. The launch button is also there on the Lock screen, so you don’t even need to unlock your phone because you’ll be using the exact same security steps before you can use your credit card. How to set up Samsung Pay When you open the Samsung Pay app, you’re greeted with a series of pages before you get to the Home screen seen in the following figure. These pages include marketing introductions (which you don’t need because you read this article), permissions and agreements (which you should give if you want to move forward), and some pages that verify that Samsung Pay can work on your phone. The app wants to make sure that your phone has the right parts (your Galaxy S20 does, but that is not the case for every Android phone) and that you are in one of the 27 countries where Samsung Pay is accepted. You’re set if you’re in the United States, Canada, China, or Kazakhstan (very nice!). You’re out of luck if you’re in, say, Yemen. Being in these countries is important for this app because each country has its own set of laws for payments, and Samsung may not have all the arrangements in place if you are not in one of these countries. New countries will be added as quickly as possible. Read the agreements. In all likelihood, they are the same kind of agreements that exist in the fine print in your existing credit card and every time you sign your name to a credit card charge slip that affirms you won’t pull any shenanigans. That said, I am your humble author, not your legal advisor, and you should feel comfortable with these agreements. The next part of the initial setup process is to step through how you want to set up security. You have two security options when you are making a transaction: using your fingerprint or entering a PIN. There are a few scenarios where using a Samsung Pay PIN rather than a fingerprint might make sense. In most cases, using your fingerprint is exceptionally convenient. If you haven’t set these up yet, the Samsung Pay application will walk you through the steps to do so. It’s quick and easy. The next step is to enter your credit card information. When you tap the link that says Cards on the home page or the menu, you’re taken to a screen that shows you the images of the credit cards you’ve added. Initially, the screen will be empty. This figure shows what it looks like after you have entered your first card. To add a new card, tap the blue circle in the lower-right corner with a silhouette of a credit card and a plus sign. You get a pop-up with some choices. Pick the Add Credit/Debit Card option to start this process. The left image in the following figure is when the screen first comes up and the right image is when you have the desired credit card in the viewfinder. The app then interprets the information on the front of your credit card and populates as many screens as possible with your credit card information. It will ask you to fill out the form seen in the following figure if it can’t figure out the information on your card or the information is on the reverse side of the card. Not every company that offers credit cards is signed up with Samsung Pay. You can check the Samsung website or tap the link to check before you proceed. Otherwise, just go ahead and see whether things go through. Tap Next, and Samsung Pay will seek to confirm things with your credit card company. This does not cost you anything. It just wants to make sure that when you do make a charge, everything will flow smoothly. One of the things the company will want to verify is that you are authorized to use that credit card. This means that either you need to be the primary cardholder or you need to coordinate with that person. Keep in mind that scanning your fingerprint and tapping your phone on a credit card reader has the same legal implications as actually signing a credit slip. When the credit card company verifies that everything is on the up and up, you get an acknowledgement like the one shown. How to use Samsung Pay First, pick something to buy at a store. Have a clerk ring it up and tell him you will pay with a credit card. Swipe the screen upward. You see the screen seen shown here. Enter your fingerprint by pressing the icon and you see a screen similar to this one. You should either hold your phone against where the credit card reader would read the magnetic stripe or where there is the contactless payment system logo if it is available. The semicircle above your signature will start counting down, and your phone will vibrate to let you know that it is transmitting. You will hear a beep if it all goes through. If it fails for some reason, you can try again simply by reentering your security option. This process works with the vast majority of credit card readers. This does not work well, however, with credit card readers where you insert your card into the machine and pull it out quickly. This type of reader is mostly used on gasoline pumps. Sorry.

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How to Sync a Bluetooth Headset to a Galaxy S20

Article / Updated 09-14-2020

With a Bluetooth headset device, you can talk on your phone without having to hold the phone to your ear — and without any cords running from the phone to your earpiece. You’ve probably come across plenty of people talking on Bluetooth headsets. You might even have wondered whether they were a little crazy talking to themselves. Well, call yourself crazy now, because when you start using a Bluetooth headset, you might never want to go back. Not surprisingly, Galaxy S20 phones can connect to Bluetooth devices. The first step to using a Bluetooth headset with your phone is to sync the two devices. Here’s how: From the Home screen on your phone, slide up to get to the Apps screen. This gets you to the list of all the applications on your phone. Flick or pan to the Settings icon and tap it. The Settings icon is shown here. This screen holds most of the settings that you can adjust on your phone. If you prefer, you can also bring down the notification screen and tap the gear icon or tap the menu button on the Home screen. All these actions will get you to the same place. Tapping on the Settings icon brings up the screen shown. Tap the Connections icon. All the options for connectivity on your phone appear. Tap the Bluetooth icon. This will bring up one of the two screens shown in the following figure. If Bluetooth is off, it will look like the screen to the left. If it is on, it will look like the screen on the right. Put the phone in to Pairing mode by turning on Bluetooth or by turning Bluetooth off and on again. This step enables your phone to be visible to other Bluetooth devices. This state will last for about 60 seconds — enough time for you to get your Bluetooth device into pairing mode so that both devices can negotiate the proper security settings and pair up every time they “see” each other from now on. For example, the phone in the right image recognizes its old friend, the Plantronics Backbeat Pro. This device and the phone are shown in this image trying to re-establish a connection. The Backbeat Pro and this phone had a connection at one time. That connection was broken. Now they want to pair up again. This is automatic once you exchange the correct security code. Next, put your headset into sync mode. Follow the instructions that came with your headset. After a moment, the phone “sees” the headset. When it does, you’re prompted to enter the security code, and the software keyboard pops up. Enter the security code for your headset and then tap the Enter button. The security code on most headsets is 0000, but check the instructions that came with your headset if that number doesn’t work. Your phone might see other devices in the immediate area. If so, it asks you which device you want to pair with. Tap the name of your headset. Your headset is now synced to your phone. If you turn one on when the other is already on, they recognize each other and automatically pair up. Some manufacturers make it easier to link via Bluetooth. For example, you may have received a pair of Samsung Galaxy Buds. With these ear buds, you simply open the case where you store the buds with your phone in scan mode. You’re asked to connect, and it’s all done. Don’t be surprised when it’s even easier than the steps listed in this article!

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How to Make Calls on Your Samsung Galaxy S20

Article / Updated 09-14-2020

At its essence, any cellphone — no matter how fancy or smart — exists to make phone calls. The good news is that making and receiving phone calls on your Samsung Galaxy S20 is easy. How to make calls on the Galaxy S20 After your phone is on and you’re connected to your cellular carrier, you can make a phone call. It all starts from the Home screen. Along the bottom of the screen, above the Device Function keys, are either four or five icons, which are the primary shortcuts. The primary shortcuts on your phone may differ slightly, but in this case, from left to right, they are Phone Camera Email Messages To make a call, follow these steps: From the Home screen, tap the Phone icon. You will see a screen like the one shown. This screen, called Recents, shows any calls you have made or received, such as the one from your carrier to confirm that you phone has been set up correctly. Tap the Keypad link at the bottom left of your screen. This icon is a green circle with little white dots that symbolize the touch pad on a regular landline phone. Tap the telephone number you want to call. The Keypad screen appears. This looks like a full-sized version of a touch pad on a regular landline phone. For long distance calls while in the United States, you don’t need to dial 1 before the area code — just dial the area code and then the seven-digit phone number. Similarly, you can include the 1 and the area code for local calls. On the other hand, if you’re traveling internationally, you need to include the 1 — and be prepared for international roaming charges! Tap the green phone button at the bottom of the screen to place the call. The screen changes to the screen shown. You have a chance to verify you dialed the person you intended. Within a few seconds, you should hear the phone ringing at the other end or a busy signal. From then on, it is like a regular phone call. When you’re done with your call, tap the red phone button at the bottom of the screen. The call is disconnected. If the other party answers the phone, you have a few options available to you by tapping on the correct icon/hyperlink on the screen, including: Put the call on hold. Add another call to have a three-way conversation. Increase the volume. Switch on a Bluetooth device. Turn on the phone’s speaker. Bring up the keypad to enter numbers. Mute the microphone on the phone. You can do any or all of these, or you can just enjoy talking on the phone. If the call doesn’t go through, either the cellular coverage where you are is insufficient, or your phone got switched to Airplane mode, which shuts off all the radios in the phone. (It’s possible, of course, that your cellular carrier let you out the door without having set you up for service, but that’s pretty unlikely!) Check the notification section at the top of the screen. If there are no connection-strength bars, try moving to another location. If you see a small airplane silhouette, bring down the notification screen and tap the plane icon to turn off Airplane mode. If you pull down the notification screen and you don’t see the green silhouette of an airplane, scroll the green or gray icons to the left. This icon may be off the page. Alternatively, tap the icon with the boxes in the upper-right corner, and you will see all the notification icons. How to answer calls on the Galaxy S20 Receiving a call is even easier than making a call. When someone calls you, caller ID information appears in a pop-up screen. This figure shows some screen options for an incoming call. If you aren’t doing anything with the phone at that moment, it will present you with the full screen. If you’re using an app, it will give you a pop-up screen, as shown in the image on the right. To answer the call, tap or slide the green phone button. To not answer a call, you can simply ignore the ringing, or you can tap or slide the red phone button. The ringing stops immediately, and in either case, the call goes to voicemail. Regardless of what you were doing on the phone at that moment — such as listening to music or playing a game — the answer pop-up screen can appear. Any active application, including music or video, is suspended until the call is over. For callers to leave you messages, you must set up your voicemail. If you haven’t yet set up your voicemail, the caller will hear a recorded message saying that your voicemail account isn’t yet set up. Some cellular carriers can set up voicemail for you when you activate the account and get the phone; others require you to set up voicemail on your own. Ask how voicemail works at your carrier store or look for instructions in the manual included with your phone. The answer and reject icons are pretty standard on any cellular phone. However, your Galaxy S20 is no standard phone. There is a third option, and what happens depends on your individual phone. In addition to the standard options of answer or reject, you have one more option — to reject and send the caller a text message. As your caller is sent to your voicemail, you also can immediately send the caller a text message that acknowledges the call. Some of the typical canned messages that you can send are: Sorry, I’m busy. Call back later. I’m in a meeting. I’ll call you back. I’m at the movie theater. I’m in class. You tap the message that applies. The message is sent as a text right away, which alerts the caller that you’re not ignoring him — it’s just that you can’t talk right now. Nice touch. You can also create and store your own message, like “Go away and leave me alone,” or “Whatever I am doing is more important than talking to you.” You could also be polite. To create your own canned message, tap Compose new message and type away. It’s then stored on your phone for when you need it. The caller has to be able to receive text messages on the phone used to make the call. This feature doesn’t work if your caller is calling from a landline or a cellphone that can’t receive texts.

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10 Features to Look for from Samsung Galaxy S20

Article / Updated 09-14-2020

With the power of your Samsung Galaxy S20 and the flexibility offered in Android applications development, it can be difficult to imagine that even more capabilities could be in the works. In spite of this, the following are ten features that would improve the usability and value of your Galaxy S20 phone. Always-on personal “dash-cam” Here is a mind-blowing concept: Your smartphone can continuously record your location, the sound, and video, up to and including a 360° perspective at HD level quality. There are two obstacles to this application: privacy and cost. The biggest issue with privacy/security is the human factor, not the technology. Cost is an issue. Today, you can store a full day’s video for about $10. However, the price of storage is declining by half every year (OK, every 14 months, but I want to keep the math simple). In less than a decade, assuming that these trends continue, you could store every word, every bad driver you encounter (I am thinking about you, Mr. Paul and Mr. Madamba), every move you make, every breath you take, in a year for about $10. So why would you want to? Well, for one, video is wonderful if you are a victim of a crime. Second, it is very handy if you are ever accused of a crime to have solid evidence that you were not there. Next, this information would be very handy for lost children or mentally challenged adults for their protection. With scenarios such as this, it is hard to imagine all the possibilities, but the technology is here today and the costs are coming down fast, so it is not unreasonable to imagine that, in the 2020s, someone’s Samsung Galaxy S20 will be used for this purpose. Home IoT services to differentiate real estate Much of the discussion about home IoT services involves individuals buying new appliances, thermostats, lighting, security, and other items. That works for home-owners. It can also work for apartment dwellers and new home buyers where the landlord or builder provides these services as a way to differentiate their offerings. Typically, they will offer a mobile app to access all this stuff. This makes it easier for you to adopt this capability without having to maintain it yourself. New delivery concepts Most of us over the age of five years old know our address. It is on our driver’s license. It is where we get things delivered from Amazon.com and other e-tailers. It is customary to have stuff shipped to a real address. However, if you are homeless, a road-warrior for business, or simply social, you are not always at that physical address. Here is the future: Your smartphone will increasingly be used as the place to arrange for delivery. You can arrange to have physical stuff delivered to where you are, rather than an address. Shippers know where you will be based upon your smartphone, and can deliver to you personally. This delivery can be by a drone, but more likely, it will still be by truck. They can find you and get the physical what-ever-it-is-that-you-want in your hands quicker than you can say Jack Robinson (i.e., impressively fast). Smarter customer care for your phone You may not realize this, but your cellular carrier lives on pins and needles during the first few weeks after you get your new phone. This is the period when you can return your phone, no questions asked. Once you go past that date, you cannot cancel your contract without a lot of hassle on your part. This is why, if you bring your phone back to the store reporting a problem, your carrier will tend to swap out your old phone for a brand new one. Usually, you’ll just take the new phone and walk out with a big smile on your face. This outcome is good customer care for most products — but not necessarily good customer care for smartphones. The reason? One of the most common sources of trouble has nothing to do with the phone at all. For example, you may have left your Wi-Fi and Bluetooth on all the time, causing your battery to drain too fast. You may have left your phone on your dashboard and cooked the battery. Or, through no fault of your own, you may have downloaded two badly written apps that conflict with each other, causing the CPU in the phone to run nonstop as these two apps battle it out for resources. The problem here is that unless someone spends the time to help you with the underlying problem, you’ll be back in the store with the same problem. At that point, however, you cannot return your phone. If you’re sympathetic, or very annoying, your carrier may give you a refurbished phone. You walk out of the store, but without the biggest smile on your face. Unfortunately, nobody dealt with the underlying trouble, so you’ll be back, once again, with the same problem. No surprise if you start to think that the problem is with that darn phone. In fact, the store needs to listen to you about how you’re using the phone and then help you get the most out of it. This is hard to do in a retail environment where the sales force is under pressure to sell lines of service and gets no concrete reward for helping you with your problem. This is where smarter customer care comes in. With the proper tools, you can work with a product expert to troubleshoot your phone. Some companies specialize in understanding the underlying problems and coming up with solutions for consumers. This kind of customer care costs the carriers a little more, but it makes for fewer unnecessary returns of perfectly good phones — and for much happier customers. Smartphone as entertainment hub Today’s savvy technology customer has at some or all of the following: Intelligent Big Screen TV or Dumb TV with a set-top box for home entertainment. Home Stereo System for immersive music. Home PC/Laptop for home management and entertainment. Work or School PC/Laptop This helps you keep home and work separate. Tablet for the folks that find the larger screen to complement their smartphone. Gaming Console for games. It would be hard to argue that having all these devices in one would not have advantages except for the following realities: Docking your smartphone to your big-screen TV and/or stereo system is not very convenient. Docking your smartphone so that you can use a full-size computer screen, keyboard, and mouse is also not very convenient. The tablet screen size can be easier to view. The digital music on my smartphone is great, but there are many people who still want access to their DVD, CD and/or vinyl collections. Gaming Console still have better games than what are available on a smartphone. There will come a day when docking becomes so convenient that all your computing and entertainment will come through your smartphone, and you’ll connect to an ergonomic keyboard, a bigger screen, and/or more powerful music amplifier at your convenience. The elements are there today, but it is just not convenient enough. Driving in your car After years of tempting us in science fiction movies, driverless cars are now starting to appear on the roads. Several insurance companies offer you an app to store your auto insurance information. Some car manufacturers allow you to check the location of your car and lock/unlock your car. These are all a good start. What about the car unlocking and adjusting the seats and mirrors when you get close without one of those bulky key fobs? What about communication between your car and phone that would more intelligently let you use certain phone features if you are in the passenger seat rather than the driver seat or, if you are in the driver seat, to give you the freedom to check some texts while the traffic is stopped. It is generally preferable for car to have its Intelligence built in and run off the car battery. That said, your smartphone knows more about you and your preferences. The best of both worlds is when you’re car your phone can collaborate to provide the best and safest experience. Serving you better The smartphone is the mechanism that companies use to find a better way to serve you. This will show up in a few ways. The first is in much better mobile advertising. There has been talk for a long time that advertisers can tell where you are and then give you ads or coupons based upon your proximity. This is just now starting to become a reality. It’s still kinda clumsy. If you have been Googling, say, televisions, you may see ads relating to sales about televisions. In the future, however, your phone may tell you about a sale going on for Samsung televisions when you walk by the Sears store in the mall. That is cool. Even cooler is to be told that that particular model is on sale at the Wal-Mart store and that this particular sale is the best in town by over $20. This can happen if you are doing research at the moment. It may be possible for your app to flag you if you have ever done this kind of research on the Internet. The second way smartphones are enhancing service is by automating the order-taking process. For example, wherever you see a video kiosk, that company can allow you to interact with the information on the kiosk with your Samsung Galaxy S20. Some fast-food restaurants have installed kiosks so that customers can bypass the line to order from the menu. The items are totaled and paid for by credit card. The customer steps aside and waits for his or her number to be called. This exact transaction could take place on your smartphone. You don’t have to wait while the guy in front of you struggles to decide between a double cheeseburger or two single cheeseburgers … and hold the pickles. Instead, you can place your order on your smartphone and wait with eager anticipation to find out what toys are in your kid’s meal. Placing you indoors The Global Positioning System (GPS) is great. It can tell you precisely your location on the road and off the road. There is a confession to be made. GPS doesn’t work so well within buildings. Once you are in a building, your phone only kind of knows where you are. The satellite responsible for sending out signals so that your phone can figure out your position is no longer visible, and the GPS in your phone waits patiently until it sees another satellite. Until then, it stops trying to figure out where you are. This is rarely a problem if you are, say, at your home. It is probably only a few thousand square feet. Things are altogether different if you are wandering around the Palazzo Casino in Las Vegas. At 6.95 million square feet, this building has the most floor area of any building in the United States. You could be anywhere in the 160 acres of luxury resort space. It is unfortunate if the Carnevino Steakhouse sends you a mobile coupon offering a two-for-one meal to your Galaxy S20 while you are already sitting in the Delmonico Steakhouse. It can be a tragedy if you start choking on too big a bite of your porterhouse steak and emergency services cannot find you. There are some efforts out there to come up with a better way to locate you when you are indoors. One approach has been to estimate your location based upon signal strength of known Wi-Fi access points. Companies that hire a large number of smarticles (smart people) are trying a variety of technologies to address this problem. May the best company win so that we may all get better location-based services! Better 911 services The 911 system has been keeping the United States safe for more than 45 years. The dirty secret of this service is that the underlying technology used to communicate information on the caller’s location hasn’t been updated in a long time. To put this in perspective, your smartphone is designed to work with data at up to 300 million bits per second. When you call 911, the phone that answers your call is designed to work with data at up to 120 bits per second. (Seriously. I am not making this up.) Many states and regions are trying to address this problem. This effort is called next-generation 911, or NG911. NG911 promises to make the information you already have on your phone available to the people who are sending you help. This new technology is slowly being implemented region by region in different states and counties. For example, most 911 dispatchers can’t access the data from the health sensors described in the previous section. With NG911, you can set up your phone so that first responders receive your vital signs and EKG the moment they get the call to respond to your emergency. With a larger data pipeline between your smartphone and the first responders, you can send anything that’s relevant, including medical history, your emergency contacts, insurance data, and whether you have any protection orders against stalkers. All this information can help you — and it’s available right away because regardless of where you happen to be, your phone is typically there with you. Reducing your carbon footprint The concept of a “smart home” is gaining momentum for the consumer electronics. So, what is a smart home and what’s in it for you? The basic idea is that appliances, doorbells, computers, and lighting connect to a central hub that monitors everything and allows you to control stuff from your smartphone. It sends you an alert if someone rings your doorbell and shows you who it is. You can turn lights on or off. It can turn your thermostat up or down based upon your daily routines. The next step beyond remote control is even smarter courtesy of your S20. It will not only be able to tell when you leave the house, but also know your location and direction and how soon you’ll be home. In addition, the central hub will monitor your use of electricity and be able to tell what appliance is in use. It can tell the difference between the power use for your oven, the hot water heater, and the television. So if you forgot to turn off the iron on the ironing board as you drove away from home, no problem. The hub sends you a text. You tell the hub to turn off the iron from your Galaxy S20. When the hub sees you’re gone, it adjusts the thermostat to require less power. When the hub sees that you’re on your way home, your smart home readjusts the thermostat so that everything is comfortable when you walk in the door. Your smart home is no longer making its best guesses based upon what it thinks is your normal routine. Your smart home knows exactly where you are and how soon you’ll be walking in the door because your trusty smartphone let the hub know. This all reduces your power consumption without any inconvenience to you.

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The Extended Home Screen on the Galaxy S20

Article / Updated 09-14-2020

The Home screen is the first screen you see on the Samsung Galaxy S20 when the phone is done with setting up. Additional screens off to the right and left make up the extended Home screen. They can be seen as a panorama in the following figure. At any given moment, you see only one screen at a time. You navigate among the screen by flicking to the right and left. The Home button will always bring you back to the Home screen. The extended Home screen is where you can organize icons and other functions to best make the phone convenient for you. Out of the box, Samsung and your cellular carrier have worked together to create a starting point for you. Beyond that, though, you have lots of ways you can customize your Home screens for easy access to the things that are most important to you. To start, check out the layout of the Home screen and how it relates to other areas of the phone. Knowing these areas is important for basic navigation. The following figure shows a typical Home screen and highlights three important areas on the phone: The notification area: This part of the screen presents you with small icons that let you know if something important is up, like battery life or a coupon from McDonald’s. The primary shortcuts: These four icons remain stationary as you move across the Home screen. If you notice, these have been determined by Samsung and your cellular carrier to be the four most important applications on your phone and are on all the screens. The Function keys: These three keys control essential phone functions, regardless of what else is going on at the moment with the phone. There are a series of dots just above the primary shortcuts on the extended Home screen. You may also notice that one of the dots isn’t just a dot — it’s a little house. That is the “home” Home screen. The brightest dot indicates where you are among the screens. You can navigate among screens by dragging the screen to the left or right. This moves you one screen at a time. You can also jump multiple screens by tapping on the dot that corresponds to the screen number you want to see or by dragging the dots to the screen you want to see. The following sections give you more detail on each area. How to use the Galaxy S20 Home button One of the important design features Samsung has implemented with the Galaxy phone is the “invisible” Home button. Some other smartphones have a physical button on the bottom of the front screen. To offer more screen real estate, the S20 makes it a software-based button on the bottom in the center of the function keys. The Home button may not look like much, but it is very important because it brings you back to the Home screen from wherever you are in an application. If you’re working on applications and feel like you’re helplessly lost, don’t worry. Press the Home button, close your eyes, click your heels together three times, and think to yourself, “There’s no place like home,” and you will be brought back to the Home screen. You don’t really need to do all that other stuff after pressing the Home button. Just pressing the Home button does the trick. How to add shortcuts to the galaxy Home screen You have a lot of screen real estate where you can put icons of your favorite applications and widgets. (Widgets are small apps that take care of simple functions, like displaying time or the status of your battery.) You can add shortcuts to the apps and to these widgets to your Home screen by following these steps: From the extended Home screen page where there is some space for the icon of an app, swipe your finger upward on the screen. This brings up a directory of all the apps you currently have on the phone. The number of apps and pages for their icons is practically unlimited. Press and hold the icon of the app you want to add. The icon under your finger will get a pop-up like the one shown in the following figure. Tap the Add to Home option. The icon now appears in a random spot on one of your home pages. If you like where the icon is, you’re all set. If you want to move it to another spot on your Home page, continue on to the next step. Press and hold the icon you want to move. Two things happen with the icon. First you get a pop-up that asks you if you want to uninstall the app and some other options. To move the icon, slide your finger on the screen to where you want it to live. When you’re happy with its location, lift your finger and it now has a new home. Done. How to take away shortcuts Say that you find that you really don’t use that app as much as you thought you would, and you want to have less clutter on your Home page. No problem. Press and hold the icon. A pop-up like the one shown appears. Simply tap the garbage can, and off it goes to its maker. It’s gone from your Home page, but if you made a mistake, you can get it back easily enough. To re-create it, simply go back to the App Menu key and follow the process again. It’s still on your phone.

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