Guitar For Dummies, 4th Edition
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Most movable barre chords on the guitar are either E-based, meaning they get their names from the notes you play on the 6th (low E) string, or A-based, meaning they get their names from the notes you play on the 5th (A) string. To find the correct fret for any E-based barre chord (whether major, minor, or seventh), refer to the following fretboard for the correct frets for notes on the E string. For example, if you want a G chord, play at the 3rd fret; if you want a C chord, play at the 8th fret, and so on.

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To find the correct fret for any A-based barre chord (whether major, minor, or seventh), refer to the following fretboard for notes on the A string. For example, if you want a D chord, play at the 5th fret; if you want a G chord, play at the 10th fret; and so on.

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You can even play barre chords above the 12th fret. Starting at the 13th fret, the letter names start over. That is, for E-based chords, the 13th fret = F, 14th fret = F sharp/G flat, 15th fret = G, and so on.

About This Article

This article is from the book:

About the book authors:

Mark Phillips is a former director of music at Cherry Lane Music, where he edited or arranged the songbooks of such artists as John Denver, Van Halen, Guns N??? Roses, and Metallica.

Jon Chappell is a multistyle guitarist, arranger, and former editor-in-chief of Guitar magazine.

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