Indian Cooking For Dummies
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Cooking and roasting the chicken is the first step to serving this item as a delicious dinner. However, after you roast a chicken, you still need to be able to serve your family or guests digestible pieces. Learning how to carve a chicken can sound like an intimidating task, but we must remember that this process simply means cutting the whole chicken into smaller pieces.

Follow the four steps below to carve your chicken to perfection and extract the most meat from the process:

Place the roasted chicken, breast side up, on a carving board.

Place the roasted chicken, breast side up, on a carving board.

It’s important to place your roasted chick breast side up so you can easily access the appropriate cutting points. Get your chef’s knife ready to cut!

Remove a leg by pulling it away from the body to expose the hip joint (between the thigh and the breast), and cut through the joint.

Remove a leg by pulling it away from the body to expose the hip joint (between the thigh and the breast), and cut through the joint.

A whole leg consists of the drumstick and thigh. Hold the drumstick firmly against the board and cut through the knee joint. Cutting this joint separates the leg and thigh.

Remove a wing from the joint that attaches it to the body.

Remove a wing from the joint that attaches it to the body.

Cut as close to the breast as possible. A whole wing consists of three parts: the pointy wing tip, the flat part, and the part that looks like a mini drumstick.

Carve the breast meat parallel to the center bone, slicing toward the top of the breast.

Carve the breast meat parallel to the center bone, slicing toward the top of the breast.

Keep the slices thin and put them on a serving platter. Enhance the dinner experience by garnishing the platter with other foods such as potatoes, vegetables or herbs like rosemary.

About This Article

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About the book author:

Monisha Bharadwaj's books have won awards including the Gourmand World Cookbook Award. She is a trained chef from the Institute of Hotel Management in Mumbai, and lives in London, where she runs her Indian cooking school.

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