Law School For Dummies book cover

Law School For Dummies

Author:
Rebecca Fae Greene
Published: May 23, 2003

Overview

The straightforward guide to surviving and thriving in law school

Every year more than 40,000 students enter law school and at any given moment there are over 125,000 law school students in the United States. Law school’s highly pressurized, super-competitive atmosphere often leaves students stressed out and confused, especially in their first year. Balancing life and schoolwork, passing the bar, and landing a job are challenges that students often need help facing. In Law School For Dummies, former law school student Rebecca Fae Greene uses straight talk, sound advice, and gentle humor to help students sort through the swamp of coursework and focus on what’s important–all while maintaining a life. She also offers rare insight on the law school experience for women, minorities, non-traditional, and non-Ivy League students.

The straightforward guide to surviving and thriving in law school

Every year more than 40,000 students enter law school and at any given moment there are over 125,000 law school students in the United States. Law school’s highly pressurized, super-competitive atmosphere often leaves students stressed out and confused, especially in their first year. Balancing life and schoolwork, passing the bar, and landing a job are

challenges that students often need help facing. In Law School For Dummies, former law school student Rebecca Fae Greene uses straight talk, sound advice, and gentle humor to help students sort through the swamp of coursework and focus on what’s important–all while maintaining a life. She also offers rare insight on the law school experience for women, minorities, non-traditional, and non-Ivy League students.

Law School For Dummies Cheat Sheet

Law school is a major challenge — especially the first year — and a major opportunity. Knowing how to make yourself a standout applicant gets you into the classroom, where you can make use of techniques to get the most out of all three years of law school. You'll also need to look for appropriate jobs during the summers. Then, you may find that the lawyerly life isn’t for you and look for alternatives to a career in law.

Articles From The Book

8 results

General Law Articles

How to Make the Most of Your Second and Third Years of Law School

After you survive 1L — the first year of law school — you don’t get to relax exactly, but you do get to catch your breath and glance up from your books to consider the world around you and your place in it. Some options available to you in your second and third years of law school include the ability to

  • Choose electives based on personal interest, bar courses, and graduation requirements.

  • Pursue extracurricular activities that help narrow down your area of practice options.

  • Maintain a network of contacts on whom you can call for advice.

  • Investigate areas of practice that interest you by informational interviewing and joining local and state bar associations.

General Law Articles

How to Survive Law School Exams

Law school is hard — everyone knows that. And, possibly the hardest part of law school are the exams. You need to know what to expect and be able to adjust when the exam covers something you didn’t prepare for. Some tips for getting through law exams include

  • Make sure your outline is up to speed

  • Give yourself plenty of time to study

  • Understand the types of questions you may encounter

  • Practice hypotheticals to increase understanding

  • Snag a dedicated study group

  • Take and review many practice exams

General Law Articles

Qualifications of the Ideal Law School Applicant

If you’re considering going to law school, you know your reasons for applying, but you may not know what law schools look for in a candidate. For a law school admissions committee, the ideal applicant has the following credentials:

  • Has taken a variety of challenging courses in college and scored well in them

  • Has a well-thought out reason for wanting to go to law school

  • Has excelled in extracurricular, service-oriented, or work-related activities

  • Writes a dynamic personal statement that reveals an intriguing personality to admissions committees