Sewing For Dummies
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Ripping out rows of stitches is inevitable if you notice a mistake several rows down in your work, To rip out stitches row-by-row, you take the piece off the needles, undo your work as far back as necessary, and then start over.

Locate the row your mistake is on and mark it with a safety pin.

You don’t want to rip back any farther than necessary. If you’re working with an exceptionally thin yarn, you may want to thread a so-called safety line of yarn through the stitches on the last good row of knitting (the last row without a mistake).

Slide your needle out of the stitches.

This is where you probably want to take a few deep, steadying breaths.

Pull gently on the working yarn, undoing the stitches.

Stop when you reach the row above the mistake (which you’ve marked with a safety pin).

Slowly rip to the end of the row.

Be careful not to rip farther than necessary!

Place your knitting so that the working yarn is on the right.

Flip the fabric over if you have to.

Insert the tip of the needle into the first stitch on the row below and gently pull to free the yarn from the stitch.

Insert the tip of the needle into the first stitch on the row below and gently pull to free the yarn from the stitch.

You should have one stitch solidly planted on the RH needle.

Continue undoing stitches until you reach your mistake.

Continue undoing stitches until you reach your mistake.

Rip out your mistake, turn your work, and start knitting again!

Using a needle several sizes smaller to pick up the last row of your ripped-out knitting makes it easier to snag the stitches. Then, when it’s time to begin knitting again, work the next row with your regular needle.

About This Article

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About the book author:

Jan Saunders Maresh is a nationally known sewing journalist and educator as well as a best-selling author of 15 books, including Home Staging For Dummies. She has worked as the director of consumer education for White Sewing Machine Company and JoAnn Fabrics and is also an interior re-designer, color specialist, and certified staging professional.

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