Knitting & Crocheting All-in-One For Dummies
Book image
Explore Book Buy On Amazon
Mattress stitch makes a practically invisible and nicely flexible seam for joining pieces side to side. You can’t use mattress stitch successfully, however, on pieces that don’t have the same number of rows or a difference of only 1 or 2 rows.

Lay out your pieces next to each other, right sides facing up, bottom edges toward you.

You seam from the bottom edge up. If you’ve left a tail of yarn at the cast-on edge, you can use it to get started.

Locate the running thread between the first and second stitches on the bottom row of one piece.

Locate the running thread between the first and second stitches on the bottom row of one piece.

Gently pull apart the first 2 edge stitches to see the series of little horizontal — running — threads connecting them.

Thread the tail of yarn or a fresh piece on a tapestry needle.

Make sure your tapestry needle is blunt to avoid piercing the yarn.

Join the bottom edges of the pieces, using a figure eight.

Join the bottom edges of the pieces, using a figure eight.

Work through the two threads on the cast-on row.

Bring your needle under the thread; then pick up the running thread between the first and second stitches on the opposing piece.

Bring your needle under the thread; then pick up the running thread between the first and second stitches on the opposing piece.

This step begins your mattress stitch pattern.

Work back and forth from running thread to running thread to running thread, keeping the tension easy but firm.

Check the tension by pulling laterally on the seam from time to time. The amount of give should be the same as between 2 stitches.

About This Article

This article is from the book:

About the book authors:

Pam Allen is a knitwear designer and founder of Quince & Co. Shannon Okey is an author and knitwear designer. Find her at knitgrrl.com. Tracy Barr has been an editor, editorial manager, writer, and consultant on several Dummies books. Marlaina "Marly" Bird hosts her own YouTube channel, where she instructs viewers on knitting and crochet. Susan Brittain is a knitwear pattern designer and writer. Karen Manthey edits crochet diagrams for numerous books, magazines, yarn companies, and designers. Manthey was an editor at All American Crafts for 20 years.

This article can be found in the category: