Fundamental Analysis For Dummies, 2nd Edition
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You don’t have to subscribe to costly online services to get the data you need for fundamental analysis. Much of the fundamental analysis data you need is available from high-quality sites including:
  • SEC.gov: If there’s one site you, as a fundamental analyst, need to know about, it’s this one. SEC.gov is a massive repository of financial information provided by the regulator, the Securities and Exchange Commission. The top function you’ll want is the ability to download all companies’ financial statements.

  • Nasdaq.com: Nasdaq is best known for being a leading stock market exchange, a forum where traders buy and sell shares of certain stocks. But Nasdaq has built out a respectable Web site, containing loads of information for fundamental analysts. You’ll find summaries of companies’ financial statements, trading information, and stock quotes.

  • USATODAY.com: If you’re looking for business news, money.usatoday.com contains everything from business trends to economic reports. The site also contains a historical stock price lookup feature that will tell you what a stock’s price was in the past. There’s also a Stock Meter, which tells you how conservative or aggressive a stock is. You’ll also find the column, Ask Matt, each weekday.

  • moneycentral.msn.com: If you’re trying to find stocks that meet certain fundamental criteria, moneycentral.msn.com has a powerful screening tool. You can tell the system what traits you’re looking for, and it returns a list of all the stocks and companies that meet your criteria.

  • Morningstar.com: Morningstar is best known as being a research firm that tracks mutual funds. But Morningstar.com contains quite a bit of information on stocks, including fundamental data. It’s also interesting to look up mutual funds and see which stocks they own, especially if the funds have skilled fundamental analysts.

About This Article

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About the book author:

Matt Krantz, a nationally known financial journalist, has been writing for USA Today since 1999. He covers financial markets and Wall Street, concentrating on developments affecting individual investors and their portfolios. Matt also writes a daily online investing column called "Ask Matt," which appears every trading day at USATODAY.com.

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