Music Theory For Dummies
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In the world of music, you may encounter different names for the many notes used. The U.S. and U.K. standard terms differ, but the U.S. names — which were originally translated from the German names for the notes because so many German composers immigrated to the United States in the 19th century — are more universally standard. The U.K. names are also used in medieval music and in some classical circles. The following table shows the common notes and their U.S. and U.K. names.

U.S. Note Name Note U.K. Note Name
Double whole
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Breve
Whole
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Semibreve
Half
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Minim
Quarter
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Crotchet
Eighth
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Quaver
Sixteenth
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Semiquaver
Thirty-second
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Demisemiquaver

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About the book authors:

Michael Pilhofer has worked as a professional musician for more than 20 years and teaches music theory. He is the coauthor of all editions of Music Theory For Dummies and Music Composition For Dummies. Holly Day is the coauthor of Music Theory For Dummies and Music Composition For Dummies. Her articles have appeared in publications across the globe.

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