Network Administration: Displaying DNS Records

One of the main uses of nslookup is to examine your DNS configuration to make sure that it’s set up properly. To do that, follow these steps:

  1. At a command prompt, type nslookup without any parameters.

    nslookup displays the name of the default name server and displays the > prompt.

    C:>nslookup
    Default Server:  ns1.orng.twtelecom.net
    Address:  168.215.210.50
    >
  2. Type the subcommand set type=any.

    nslookup silently obeys your command and displays another prompt:

    > set type=any
    >
  3. Type your domain name.

    nslookup responds by displaying the name servers for your domain:

    > lowewriter.com
    Server:  ns1.orng.twtelecom.net
    Address:  168.215.210.50
    Non-authoritative answer:
    lowewriter.com  nameserver = NS000.NS0.com
    lowewriter.com  nameserver = NS207.PAIR.com
    lowewriter.com  nameserver = NS000.NS0.com
    lowewriter.com  nameserver = NS207.PAIR.com
    >
  4. Use a server command to switch to one of the domain’s name servers.

    For example, to switch to the first name server listed in Step 3, type server NS000.NS0.com. nslookup replies with a message that indicates the new default server:

    > server ns000.ns0.com
    Default Server:  ns000.ns0.com
    Address:  216.92.61.61
    >
  5. Type your domain name again.

    This time, nslookup responds by displaying the DNS information for your domain:

    > lowewriter.com
    Server:  ns000.ns0.com
    Address:  216.92.61.61
    lowewriter.com
            primary name server = ns207.pair.com
            responsible mail addr = root.pair.com
            serial  = 2001121009
            refresh = 3600 (1 hour)
            retry   = 300 (5 mins)
            expire  = 604800 (7 days)
            default TTL = 3600 (1 hour)
    lowewriter.com  nameserver = ns000.ns0.com
    lowewriter.com  nameserver = ns207.pair.com
    lowewriter.com  MX preference = 50, mail exchanger = sasi.pair.com
    lowewriter.com  internet address = 209.68.34.15
    >
  6. Type exit to leave the Nslookup program.

    You return to a command prompt.

> exit
C:>

Wasn’t that fun?