Tantalizing Teas for Acid Reflux Sufferers - dummies

Tantalizing Teas for Acid Reflux Sufferers

By Patricia Raymond, Michelle Beaver

It’s hard to replace the comfort and deliciousness of a latte or mocha or even a plain old cup of Joe. But because coffee is a trigger for many people with acid reflux, you may want (or need) to cut down on coffee or cut it out. A lovely substitute: tea. Tea isn’t as rich as coffee, but the upside is that it’s more refreshing.

Some people think tea is too mild. To make the flavors stronger, steep the tea longer and/or add more sweetener. It will also gain more flavor as it sits (after the brewing process).

You can make a big batch of these teas, or just a single serving. You can drink them hot or cold. Finally, each of these teas can be made with caffeine or without. Caffeine is a diuretic, which means it’s dehydrating, but a little caffeine shouldn’t be a problem unless you have other conditions that are exacerbated by caffeine, such as certain heart problems.

Each of these recipes can be made with a regular tea kettle (or even a simple pot) or an electric tea kettle. You can use tea bags or, for loose-leaf tea, a tea strainer. Each of these options works well — which one you use is just a matter of personal preference.

[Credit: Illustration by Elizabeth Kurtzman]
Credit: Illustration by Elizabeth Kurtzman

Fresh Ginger Tea

Preparation time: 5 minutes

Yield: 1 serving

One 2-inch piece fresh ginger, peeled and thinly sliced

1 cup boiling water

  1. Steep the ginger in the water for 5 minutes, and serve.

Per serving: Calories 0 (From Fat 0); Fat 0g (Saturated 0g); Cholesterol 0mg; Sodium 0mg; Carbohydrate 0g (Dietary Fiber 0g); Protein 0g.

Some people find tea bland and boring. It can take a little while to get used to the more nuanced flavor of tea, and some people never do. Flavoring your tea can give it that verve you may desire. To incorporate more flavor into this tea, or any tea, steep the tea longer. After it’s steeped, add sugar, honey, a few teaspoons of juice, or a splash of milk.

Nettle Iced Tea

Preparation time: 10 minutes

Yield: 1 serving

1 nettle teabag

One 2-inch piece fresh ginger, peeled and thinly sliced

1 cup boiling water

1/2 cup crushed ice

5 to 10 blueberries, for garnish

  1. Steep the teabag and ginger in the water for 10 minutes.

  2. Allow the tea to cool. Then remove the tea bag and ginger from the water.

  3. Pour the tea over the ice, garnish with the blueberries, and serve.

Per serving: Calories 4 (From Fat 0); Fat 0g (Saturated 0g); Cholesterol 0mg; Sodium 0mg; Carbohydrate 1g (Dietary Fiber 0g); Protein 0g.

Roasted Barley Tea

Preparation time: 3–5 minutes

Yield: 1 serving

1 roasted barley teabag

1 cup boiling water

Honey, optional

  1. Steep the teabag in the water for 3 to 5 minutes and serve. Mix in honey if desired.

Per serving: Calories 0 (From Fat 0); Fat 0g (Saturated 0g); Cholesterol 0mg; Sodium 0mg; Carbohydrate 0g (Dietary Fiber 0g); Protein 0g.

This rich, full-bodied, and soothing after-meal tea is known in Japan as mugi-cha. In Japanese, mugi means barley. You can buy this tea in commercial Japanese markets, as well as large natural food markets.

Red Bush Tea (Rooibos Tea)

Preparation time: 3–5 minutes

Yield: 1 serving

1 rooibos teabag

1 cup boiling water

  1. Steep the teabag in the water for 3 to 5 minutes and serve.

Per serving: Calories 0 (From Fat 0); Fat 0g (Saturated 0g); Cholesterol 0mg; Sodium 0mg; Carbohydrate 0g (Dietary Fiber 0g); Protein 0g.

Popular in South Africa for generations and now consumed in many countries, Rooibos (pronounced roy-boss), sometimes called African Red Bush Tea, contains a high level of antioxidants and no caffeine. It has low tannin levels compared to fully oxidized black tea or unoxidized green tea leaves and has a subtle sweet natural taste with a hint of nut flavoring.